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Sharpe James

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ENTERTAINMENT
March 3, 2006 | By Steven Rea INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Although the turf is the alternately blighted and rebounding cityscape of Newark, N.J., Street Fight says a lot about politics, and race, nationwide. A compelling and occasionally mind-boggling chronicle of the 2002 mayoral election in New Jersey's largest city, Marshall Curry's Oscar-nominated documentary follows an idealistic newcomer as he strives to unseat the four-term incumbent and a daunting political machine. Cory Booker, a Stanford University football star, Rhodes scholar, and Yale Law School graduate, was 32 when he launched his run against Sharpe James, an old-school Newark politician who came up from the streets, but who now owned a Rolls-Royce, two houses and a yacht.
NEWS
December 14, 2012 | By Matt Katz, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
Mayor Cory Booker lives in two political worlds. In one world, at City Hall in Newark, N.J. Booker twice casts a controversial tie-breaking vote to maneuver an ally onto the City Council, sparking a near-riot with council members yelling, "Shame on you!" A court ultimately invalidates the vote, leaving the council evenly split. In the other world, outside Newark, Booker is praised as an inspiration and courted to challenge Republican Gov. Christie in 2013. TV interviewers even ask him what happens after he becomes governor or U.S. senator: Will he run for president?
NEWS
January 25, 1991 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
The nation's mayors, meeting at the winter convention of the U.S. Conference of Mayors, said yesterday that their shrinking budgets might be the first casualties of the gulf war. "We are going to pay for this war," said Paul M. Soglin, the mayor of Madison, Wis., who echoed a common complaint that cities had already suffered from a decade's cuts in federal assistance. "The dollars now being diverted to the war . . . could be better spent on the real war that we're fighting in our cities everyday," the mayor of Newark, N.J., Sharpe James, said at the three-day convention, which ends today.
NEWS
June 4, 1986 | By Paul Horvitz, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
It was seen as his toughest political contest ever, but Rep. Peter W. Rodino Jr., the dean of New Jersey's congressional delegation, yesterday won the Democratic nomination for a 20th term. Rodino, who was first elected in 1948 and who turns 77 on Saturday, thwarted Newark City Councilman Donald M. Payne's attempt to become New Jersey's first black member of Congress. In the 1980 Democratic primary, Rodino easily defeated Payne and two other challengers. Payne won 23 percent of the vote to Rodino's 62 percent in a four-candidate field in the 1980 Democratic primary for Congress here.
NEWS
August 5, 2013
Democratic voters will choose from a rich field in New Jersey's Aug. 13 U.S. Senate primary. But Newark Mayor Cory Booker rises above his substantial competitors. Booker has earned national recognition for his grasp of urban issues, having served as chief executive of the state's largest city with grit and passion since 2006. He could fill a void in the Senate by making a case for America's cities. Based on his record and vision, CORY BOOKER is the Democrat most qualified to become an effective senator for the nation's most urbanized state.
NEWS
January 18, 2015 | By Andrew Seidman, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
Sharpe James, the former mayor of Newark and New Jersey state senator, violated campaign-finance laws when he used tens of thousands of dollars in campaign contributions to pay legal fees in response to a 2006-07 federal criminal investigation, a state appeals court affirmed Friday. James, a Democrat who served as mayor from 1986 to 2006 and as a senator from 1999 to 2008, was indicted in July 2007 by a federal grand jury on charges of conspiracy, embezzlement, and fraud. Accused of using city-issued credit cards to fund personal vacations and using his power to sell city land to a friend in a sweetheart deal, he was convicted in 2008 and sentenced to 27 months in federal prison.
NEWS
November 28, 1993 | By W. WILSON GOODE
Are black mayors inherently inferior to white mayors? Can any black mayor represent the interest of black people and be successful as mayor? Jim Sleeper, author of The Closest of Strangers: Liberalism and the Politics of Race in New York, opened the debate on what had been, prior to his comments, subtle whispers in private clubs (Commentary Page, Nov. 4). Though he used coded terms such as "Rainbow 1 politics," he clearly made broadsided criticisms of black mayors. And his arguments were both factually and historically inaccurate.
NEWS
July 13, 1987 | By Neal Peirce
Twenty years ago this summer, Newark's poor Central Ward was racked by one of the '60s cruelest urban riots. The disturbances left blocks in devastation and 23 dead - two whites, 21 blacks. Return today and what was smoldering in 1967 is strangely green: a jungle of weeds sprung up amid thousands of empty lots and gutted public-housing projects. Many of the lots are piled with trash or littered with the remnants of abandoned, stripped cars. A curtain flutters from a high window; get close and you discover the structure is gutted, entrances closed off with cinder blocks to prevent squatting or a heroin shooting gallery.
NEWS
May 14, 2002 | By Harold Jackson
People in South Jersey don't pay much attention to what goes on above Trenton, but anyone hoping for an injection of vigor into Camden's political leadership should keep an eye on today's mayoral election in Newark. If he succeeds, Cory Booker, 33, a Yale-educated lawyer and former Rhodes scholar, will unseat Sharpe James, 66, who is seeking his fifth four-year term and hasn't lost an election in Newark in three decades. Although Camden Mayor Gwendolyn Faison is in only her first elected term, at age 76 and having previously served 16 years on City Council she is hardly a symbol of the city's political future.
NEWS
May 13, 1986 | By Tom Torok, Inquirer Staff Writer (United Press International contributed to this article.)
Voters from more than 30 New Jersey municipalities, including some of the state's largest cities, will go to the polls today to select mayors and council members in nonpartisan elections. In Atlantic City, Mayor James L. Usry faces stiff opposition in a bid to retain his seat, which he wrestled from Mayor Michael J. Matthews in a 1984 recall election. In Newark, the state's largest city, Mayor Kenneth A. Gibson is battling three other hopefuls in an attempt to win an unprecedented fifth term.
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NEWS
January 18, 2015 | By Andrew Seidman, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
Sharpe James, the former mayor of Newark and New Jersey state senator, violated campaign-finance laws when he used tens of thousands of dollars in campaign contributions to pay legal fees in response to a 2006-07 federal criminal investigation, a state appeals court affirmed Friday. James, a Democrat who served as mayor from 1986 to 2006 and as a senator from 1999 to 2008, was indicted in July 2007 by a federal grand jury on charges of conspiracy, embezzlement, and fraud. Accused of using city-issued credit cards to fund personal vacations and using his power to sell city land to a friend in a sweetheart deal, he was convicted in 2008 and sentenced to 27 months in federal prison.
NEWS
August 5, 2013
Democratic voters will choose from a rich field in New Jersey's Aug. 13 U.S. Senate primary. But Newark Mayor Cory Booker rises above his substantial competitors. Booker has earned national recognition for his grasp of urban issues, having served as chief executive of the state's largest city with grit and passion since 2006. He could fill a void in the Senate by making a case for America's cities. Based on his record and vision, CORY BOOKER is the Democrat most qualified to become an effective senator for the nation's most urbanized state.
NEWS
July 6, 2013 | By Jonathan Tamari, Inquirer Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - For months, political operatives whispered that Cory Booker had an Achilles' heel. The Newark mayor has a national name, they said, but his headline-making exploits have come at the expense of building ties to New Jersey's Democratic elite. But when the state's Senate race began, and party leaders had to pick between Booker and three faithful lawmakers with more than 60 years of service among them, the biggest Democratic names piled onto Booker's bandwagon, including many who once stood in his way. Booker's star power, according to Democrats speaking on and off the record, has trumped more traditional dues-paying politics, allowing him to hurtle past his rivals.
NEWS
December 14, 2012 | By Matt Katz, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
Mayor Cory Booker lives in two political worlds. In one world, at City Hall in Newark, N.J. Booker twice casts a controversial tie-breaking vote to maneuver an ally onto the City Council, sparking a near-riot with council members yelling, "Shame on you!" A court ultimately invalidates the vote, leaving the council evenly split. In the other world, outside Newark, Booker is praised as an inspiration and courted to challenge Republican Gov. Christie in 2013. TV interviewers even ask him what happens after he becomes governor or U.S. senator: Will he run for president?
NEWS
July 14, 2007
Former Newark Mayor Sharpe James, indicted Thursday on corruption charges, should resign his state Senate seat in Trenton. James, 71, a Democrat, stands accused in federal court of spending the city's money on lavish items for himself, such as expensive meals and trips abroad. Prosecutors allege he also arranged to sell city land to friends at discount prices. These friends, in turn, sold the land at a handsome profit and donated money to James' campaign funds. The criminal court system will at some point determine James' guilt or innocence on these specific charges.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 3, 2006 | By Steven Rea INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Although the turf is the alternately blighted and rebounding cityscape of Newark, N.J., Street Fight says a lot about politics, and race, nationwide. A compelling and occasionally mind-boggling chronicle of the 2002 mayoral election in New Jersey's largest city, Marshall Curry's Oscar-nominated documentary follows an idealistic newcomer as he strives to unseat the four-term incumbent and a daunting political machine. Cory Booker, a Stanford University football star, Rhodes scholar, and Yale Law School graduate, was 32 when he launched his run against Sharpe James, an old-school Newark politician who came up from the streets, but who now owned a Rolls-Royce, two houses and a yacht.
NEWS
May 14, 2002 | By Harold Jackson
People in South Jersey don't pay much attention to what goes on above Trenton, but anyone hoping for an injection of vigor into Camden's political leadership should keep an eye on today's mayoral election in Newark. If he succeeds, Cory Booker, 33, a Yale-educated lawyer and former Rhodes scholar, will unseat Sharpe James, 66, who is seeking his fifth four-year term and hasn't lost an election in Newark in three decades. Although Camden Mayor Gwendolyn Faison is in only her first elected term, at age 76 and having previously served 16 years on City Council she is hardly a symbol of the city's political future.
NEWS
May 13, 2002 | By Emilie Lounsberry INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
He is young and enthusiastic and easily inspires Clintonian comparisons: Rhodes scholar. Yale Law School graduate. A charming speaker with a knack for working a room and wooing the rich and famous. But at 33, Cory Booker is still the underdog in Newark's most interesting - and rancorous - mayoral race in years, though he is definitely giving the longtime incumbent, Sharpe James, a run for the keys to City Hall. When voters go to the polls tomorrow, they will have a choice between two strikingly different Democrats - an old-style, big-city politician who has built strong connections in 32 years in public office, and a one-term councilman who was raised in the suburbs and has cast himself as a reformer.
NEWS
November 28, 1993 | By W. WILSON GOODE
Are black mayors inherently inferior to white mayors? Can any black mayor represent the interest of black people and be successful as mayor? Jim Sleeper, author of The Closest of Strangers: Liberalism and the Politics of Race in New York, opened the debate on what had been, prior to his comments, subtle whispers in private clubs (Commentary Page, Nov. 4). Though he used coded terms such as "Rainbow 1 politics," he clearly made broadsided criticisms of black mayors. And his arguments were both factually and historically inaccurate.
NEWS
January 25, 1991 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
The nation's mayors, meeting at the winter convention of the U.S. Conference of Mayors, said yesterday that their shrinking budgets might be the first casualties of the gulf war. "We are going to pay for this war," said Paul M. Soglin, the mayor of Madison, Wis., who echoed a common complaint that cities had already suffered from a decade's cuts in federal assistance. "The dollars now being diverted to the war . . . could be better spent on the real war that we're fighting in our cities everyday," the mayor of Newark, N.J., Sharpe James, said at the three-day convention, which ends today.
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