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NEWS
December 25, 2003 | By Rosemary McDonough
Some folks suffer from post-holiday depression, but I'm not one of them. I like the quiet of January; it's the holidays that stress me out. Don't get me wrong. I love the joy of Christmas. But with its growing commercialism and the morphing of December into one meaningless "holiday season," that joy becomes harder to find each year. This year, joy has been especially elusive. First, my daughter broke her finger. She'd finally made the A team in basketball, but she broke her finger the night before her first game.
NEWS
June 6, 2006
Editor's note: We recently asked our readers to try to explain the disconnect between Philadelphians and the folks who represent them in Harrisburg. This is the only letter we got. Enough said. PHILADELPHIANS suffer from resignation and cynicism caused by what seems to be a government that is no longer of, by and for the people - it seems to be of, by and for the money. Or maybe it's a goverment of special interest groups, cliques that require extreme attitudes to belong. Since Philadelphians don't have extreme attitudes (unless you're talking sports or unions)
NEWS
June 30, 1991 | By Christopher Mumma, Special to The Inquirer
It is a commonly acknowledged truth that in the summertime in the suburbs, no lawn ornament is safe. Still, even by the bemused standards of local police - who have grown accustomed to irate residents hastily filing reports - the heist pulled off a few weeks ago by graduating students at Clearview Regional High School in Mullica Hill was a big one. The suspected culprits, who police believe were graduating seniors, crept through at least...
NEWS
April 17, 1986 | By Bill Price, Inquirer Staff Writer
One of three dogs, believed to be family pets and responsible for a series of attacks on sheep and other livestock in Montgomery County since February, was shot and killed early yesterday by a Plymouth Township shepherd during another attack there. Since February, the dogs have been responsible for the deaths of 14 sheep, the mauling of 75 others and the killing of more than a dozen chickens in five attacks, according to police. All the attacks occurred at night in Plymouth and Whitemarsh Townships.
NEWS
June 25, 1989 | By Erin Kennedy, Special to The Inquirer
Sheep rustlers are back again. Ornamental lawn sheep rustlers, that is. They hit the area last week, rounding up six in Upper Gwynedd Township and three in Towamencin Township. Those fuzzy creatures with wooden legs planted in manicured turf have cropped up on suburban lawns in the last two years and along with them have come the rustlers, mostly youths playing pranks, police said. "The last time sheep were rustled in the area they turned up in a herd on the Lansdale Borough Hall lawn," said an Upper Gwynedd police dispatcher.
NEWS
July 8, 1990 | By Georgia S. Ashby, Special to The Inquirer
The East Nantmeal Board of Supervisors had mostly light housekeeping on its agenda Thursday. So it had time to talk of sheep and sweet water. The sheep came up because former Upper Merion High School teacher Wesley Sessa, who now restores old buildings and grows grapes on his farm, built a sheep shed on his property. The question before board members was whether he should have been required to have a building permit for the 18-by-25-foot structure, which he said was only temporary.
NEWS
July 27, 1986 | By Virginia M. Resnik, Special to The Inquirer
Kim Lambert took her livestock project for last week's Gloucester County 4- H Fair and turned it into something warm to wear. The 16-year-old Mantua Township resident and her family breed Corriedale and Lincoln sheep on their farm. Last summer, Kim's mother bought a loom, and together they learned the art of weaving. For her 4-H project this year, Kim raised some of the sheep herself, sheared them, washed the wool, carded it, spun the fiber into yarn, and then wove it into a scarf.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 14, 2010 | By Ty Burr, THE BOSTON GLOBE
Sweetgrass, a meditative and intensely beautiful documentary about the last sheep run in Big Timber, Mont., isn't just about the passing of a way of life. It's about the death of a particular sense of time: slow, profoundly observant, in tune with the larger cycles of nature. The movie begins with a single sheep in close-up and by the end holds the curve of the entire planet in its serenely uninflected lens. If you're used to the ADD pace of modern filmmaking, Sweetgrass will probably drive you crazy.
NEWS
February 10, 1988 | By Mike Leary, Inquirer Staff Writer
On the shores of Bala Lake, in the grassy field beyond Anthony Pugh's 16th- century stone farmhouse, grazed the radioactive sheep. They had come down from his High Hill Farm a few weeks earlier, 500 of them, living proof of the lingering effects of the Chernobyl nuclear accident in the Soviet Union almost two years ago. The British government says that sheep with such high readings cannot be slaughtered until their radiation levels drop...
NEWS
February 2, 2009 | By HANNAH MILLER
THIS IS a letter to the people of Philadelphia who don't have power and feel at the mercy of those who do. Over the last few months, it's been impossible to avoid the drumbeat of fear over the millions of people losing jobs, of the largest U.S. companies possibly closing, of thousands of new applications for unemployment. Even if you haven't lost anything, or didn't have a lot to lose in the first place, you're probably worried, confused and hoping that the folks in charge come up with a really smart plan.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 7, 2015 | By Toby Zinman, For The Inquirer
Philadelphia Artists' Collective has once again unearthed an antique play - this time the obscure Renaissance comedy The Fair Maid of the West by Thomas Heywood - polished it up, and made it shine. Under the brilliant direction of Charlotte Northeast, a rambunctious cast whips us into the rowdy audience the play demands, and we laugh and stamp our feet and clap and roar our approval. The plot is outrageously silly: A chaste barmaid, one Bess Bridges (the superb and saucy Rachel Camp)
NEWS
February 20, 2015
STUPID HATS, too much booze, "Auld Lang Syne" and overhyped plans that aren't fun - that's basically all we need to celebrate a new year here in the West. But maybe we should take a cue from the many Philadelphians who are currently in full-blast party mode. Though today's not much more than a frigid, nondescript midwinter Thursday by Gregorian standards, it marks the beginning of a vital celebration on a different calendar. It's officially Chinese New Year, though not all of us know what that entails.
NEWS
November 23, 2014 | By Erin E. Arvedlund, Inquirer Columnist
Two childhood memories always stay with me. For several years, my mom asked that we "adopt" families - whom we never met - and supply a full-Monty Christmas, including wrapped gifts, clothes, toys, and a holiday meal. And in the weeks leading up to the holidays, my dad would read Charles Dickens' A Christmas Carol to my sister and me. Sometimes, he fell asleep. I remember these as the greatest gifts they ever gave us. With hard-core, ugly-sweater-shopping season approaching in advance of Hanukkah, Christmas, and Kwanzaa, how do we avoid the urge to buy more stuff no one needs?
NEWS
April 14, 2014 | By Mari A. Schaefer, Inquirer Staff Writer
LANSDALE On the first beautiful spring weekend of the year, it was hard to tell who was enjoying the day more - all the kids running around from one activity to another, or their parents, just glad to be out of the house. "Being inside all winter was not the best," said Gena Ortega, 34, of North Wales, who came with Lily, 6, and Laila, 22 months, to the Peter Wentz Farmstead's annual Sheep Shearing Day. About 1,000 visitors came to see the farm's five ewes and one ram get their spring haircuts at the public park in Lansdale.
NEWS
March 2, 2014 | By Valerianna Amorosa, For The Inquirer
As the long and busy winter turned into spring, the young executive reveled in the tranquil escape he achieved out on the golf course. But as summer came on, the nagging ache in his right side made him wonder if he was overdoing it on the links. For a few weeks, ibuprofen seemed to make the pain subside, but eventually that didn't relieve it. Then he began having pain when he took a deep breath, which pushed him to get evaluated. He described his symptoms, and the physician examined him, clarifying that the pain was in the right upper quadrant of the patient's abdomen, the region housing the liver and the gallbladder.
NEWS
November 25, 2013 | By Lisa Scottoline, Inquirer Columnist
It's time you knew I had fleas. As if I weren't single enough. Apparently, being single is like being broke. You don't think you can get broker than broke, but you can. Just ask the government. Oh. Wait. They're closed. Oh, sorry. They're open again. Phew. Anyway, it's not my fault I have fleas, it's my dogs' fault. As you may know, I have five dogs: Ruby the Crazy Corgi, dysfunctional couple Little Tony and Ms. Peach, and bromantic puppies Boone and Kit. I don't know which dog is to blame for our fleas and have questioned them repeatedly, but none of them is confessing.
NEWS
October 6, 2013 | By Dr. Valerianna Amorosa, For The Inquirer
His success in banking had given the 39-year-old some rare opportunities. Of late, he and his family had spent much free time working outside on their exotic sheep farm. During the busy late summer preparing for autumn breeding, he had been working closely with their veterinarian. So that early fall morning when he awoke with a cough - and then started coughing up blood - he didn't think it odd to call the vet first. The vet advised him to see his doctor. A chest X-ray that morning suggested an abnormal circular area on the lung - a "nodule" - that led to a more extensive look with a CAT scan.
NEWS
September 11, 2013 | By Mari A. Schaefer, Inquirer Staff Writer
In a case that outraged animal-rights activists and generated national attention, a trial began Monday for a Chester County man charged with killing his neighbor's dogs because he believed they posed a threat to his sheep. Gabriel Pilotti, 73, of Chester Springs, was charged with cruelty to animals for shooting the two Bernese mountain dogs - 2-year-old Angus and 1-year-old Fiona - after they had escaped the fenced yard of their owners, Mary and William Bock. As a result of the attention drawn to the case, Pilotti has been the target of threats.
NEWS
August 19, 2013 | By Al Haas, For The Inquirer
Let's talk about rides that aren't what they appear to be at first glance. Let's look at some vehicles that aren't nearly as prosaic as their appearances, purposes, or pasts might suggest. Let's check out some seemingly mild-mannered machines that slipped into a phone booth and emerged with a big S on their grilles. In other words, let's look over the most memorable Wolves in Sheep's Clothing (WISCs) that I test-drove this model year. WISC #1: Toyota Tacoma X-Runner. There have been some hot-rod full-size pickup trucks offered over the years (the Ford F-150 Lightning comes to mind)
ENTERTAINMENT
April 13, 2013 | By Natalie Pompilio, For The Inquirer
The best part of the Philadelphia Zoo's new KidZooU exhibit, at least in the eyes of my two nieces, was the barnyard. As the two stood in the exhibit, they were surrounded by colorful (goat) kids, all nuzzling them in an attempt to reach the brushes the girls held. A short distance away, they marveled over the sheep wandering in their pen. An extremely loud donkey - which made the girls think of Shrek - let it be known that he needed some attention. Lest this sound like a typical children's petting zoo, realize this: KidZooU is all that you expect - and then a little more.
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