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Sheet Music

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ENTERTAINMENT
September 10, 1989 | By Ken Tucker, Inquirer TV Critic
In a way, it's interesting that Channel 12 has waited until now to allow us to see Pennies From Heaven, the decade-old British mini-series starring Bob Hoskins as a Depression-era salesman with an overactive imagination. This mini-series, which will play over three nights beginning Tuesday at 9 p.m., is getting its first airing in this area. Most major-city public- television stations have screened the widely acclaimed Pennies at least once - New York and Los Angeles recently completed their second showings of it. Pennies From Heaven was the first major success for its writer, Dennis Potter.
REAL_ESTATE
February 10, 2013 | By Sally Friedman, For The Inquirer
The passion for collecting can be a happy diversion. It also can quickly turn into a space invader. And when you happen to own what is believed to be the largest private sheet-music collection in the world, as Sandy Marrone does, space becomes an overwhelming challenge. It all began 38 years ago, when Marrone was seeking a diversion beyond her work as a photojournalist for Penn Mutual in Philadelphia and as a new mother. She had energy to spare. Soon, passion turned into magnificent obsession, as the sheet-music collection morphed into a thriving business, with collectors flocking to her. Five years ago, when Sandy and her husband, Dennis, looked around at their two-story house in the Cinnamon Hill section of Cinnaminson, one word flashed: "Basement!"
ENTERTAINMENT
August 13, 1998 | by Frank Dougherty, Daily News Staff Writer
Two Philadelphia auction houses are offering sales this week and next that reinforce that old saw that anything that can be sold can, indeed, be sold at auction. The Slosberg Auction Gallery, in Port Richmond, at 5 tonight will stage three simultaneous auctions, including one offering antique sheet music dating back to World Wars I and II, designed to delight collectors of ephemera. Webster's New World Dictionary defines ephemera as something short-lived, a plant or item with brief shelf life.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 10, 2013 | By John Timpane, Inquirer Staff Writer
Tuesday night upstairs at World Cafe Live, a one-night Woodstock-in-a-phone-booth broke out, with the title "Philly Plays Song Reader : a New Album by Beck Hansen. " It was an introduction to both a major new album and to the local music scene, as 20 Philly-region acts played through the 20-plus songs of Beck's Song Reader . This disheveled hoot of a hootenanny left the packed, sweltering audience with two impressions: (1) Song Reader is full of various, witty, retro-futzing, often poetic songs, in an exciting and challenging new/old package; and (2)
BUSINESS
January 10, 1994 | By Alan J. Heavens, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Mark Resnick knows the score. He knows lots of them, for that matter. Best of all, he can tell you where to find them. Because Resnick, president of Musicdata Inc., of Germantown, publishes catalogues of sheet music gleaned from more than 1,000 music publishers worldwide. Musicdata is to choral and classical sheet music what the Schwann catalogue is to recorded music and Books in Print is to the published word. The company sells its catalogues, collectively known as Music in Print, to orchestras, academic libraries and music dealers, Resnick said.
BUSINESS
May 19, 1997 | By Raphael Lewis, FOR THE INQUIRER
For 30 years, Bill McCann picked up his trumpet and wailed the blues, every note a testament to his life's frustrations. Blind since age 6, McCann spent his career competing for gigs armed only with a good ear and perseverance, while other players made use of a musician's most basic aid: sheet music. Braille scores, after all, make up a tiny fraction of printed music, so McCann and thousands of other blind musicians worldwide must rely on volunteer transcribers or sighted friends to get them through difficult pieces.
NEWS
November 21, 1997 | By Jennifer Weiner, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Larry Ferrari, 65, a Philadelphia institution who played the organ on his own show on Channel 6 for 40 years, died yesterday of cancer at his home in Cinnaminson. Mr. Ferrari was most recently heard on Sunday morning at 6:30 on The Larry Ferrari Show until the summer, when he became too ill to continue. He played Lawrence Welk-style tunes while birthday and anniversary greetings to his fans were displayed along the bottom of TV screens. He was a fixture in the Channel 6 Thanksgiving Day Parade, in which he performed on a float.
NEWS
May 7, 2006 | Inquirer suburban staff
What it is: Delaware Valley Music sells a wide selection of sheet music, from beginner piano books to full orchestral scores, for musicians of all levels. What we like: The store is a haven for lovers of sheet music who want more than popular collections. It sells packaged sheet music for guitar and piano as well as sheet music for band instruments and scores for groups from brass quartets and string ensembles to jazz bands and orchestras. Musicians can browse through stacks of sheet music for a score that matches their tastes and talents.
NEWS
February 22, 2016
Often thought of as the last bastions of hush, libraries are louder than one might have heard. So tune in and listen closely to Philadelphia's 300-plus-year musical legacy. Forsaking it in their religious services and sneering at it in their private lives, the Quaker founders of Philadelphia were a decidedly unmusical bunch. Fortunately for future ears, other religious and ethnic groups were counted among the city's early settlers, many with active musical traditions - and instruments - in tow. The mystic Johannes Kelpius and his small band of pietist pilgrims developed a sophisticated musical practice while living alone in the woods along the Wissahickon Creek near Germantown.
NEWS
September 6, 1997 | By Jennifer Weiner, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Like people the world over, Martin Baker spent last Saturday night riveted to the television set as it reported news of Princess Diana's Paris car crash, of her injuries, and her eventual death. Unlike people the world over, Baker, vacationing with his wife, Ann Elise Smoot, at her parents' house in Radnor, had to do more than just mourn once the funeral arrangements were announced. Baker is the sub-organist at Westminster Abbey, the second-in-command, after the abbey's conductor.
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NEWS
February 22, 2016
Often thought of as the last bastions of hush, libraries are louder than one might have heard. So tune in and listen closely to Philadelphia's 300-plus-year musical legacy. Forsaking it in their religious services and sneering at it in their private lives, the Quaker founders of Philadelphia were a decidedly unmusical bunch. Fortunately for future ears, other religious and ethnic groups were counted among the city's early settlers, many with active musical traditions - and instruments - in tow. The mystic Johannes Kelpius and his small band of pietist pilgrims developed a sophisticated musical practice while living alone in the woods along the Wissahickon Creek near Germantown.
NEWS
December 14, 2015 | By Jessica Parks, Inquirer Staff Writer
Last week Arthur Kuck celebrated a birthday. His daughter brought ribs and cake, and trimmed his fluffy white hair. His friends sang "Happy Birthday" and gave him a round of applause. His wife squeezed his hand and said proudly, "Ninety-one. " Now, Kuck couldn't tell you about any of that. Advancing dementia has curtailed both his short-term memory and his ability to communicate. "Sentences are becoming harder, if not impossible," said his daughter, Jane Frick. "He knows, but he can't verbalize.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 4, 2014 | BY JENELLE JANCI, Daily News Staff Writer jancij@phillynews.com, 215-568-5906
IN 1970, Mildred Krentel bought a toy bell set in hopes of bringing music into the lives of people with intellectual disabilities. The Melmark co-founder, who died in 2013 at 91, arranged the bells in a line like piano keys and began with simple, one-note melodies. She found that her musicians reacted well to her hand cues instead of sheet music. When it came time to name the handbell choir, the choice was simple. "It brought so much joy to their lives that they called themselves the Joybells," said Sue Graves, co-director of the group.
NEWS
September 1, 2014 | By Julia Terruso, Inquirer Staff Writer
John C. Sampson, 70, of Pennsauken, a Vietnam veteran and charter bus driver, died of a heart attack at Our Lady of Lourdes Medical Center in Camden on Wednesday, Aug. 27. Mr. Sampson, who had been battling health issues, served in Vietnam for four years as an aircraft mechanic in the Air Force. It was 1972 when Mr. Sampson, a tenor in his church choir, went to a church music convention near Wilkes-Barre and met Mary, a 26-year-old music teacher and professional cellist. Each caught the other's eye while sifting through sheet music.
BUSINESS
August 15, 2014 | By Jeff Gelles, Inquirer Columnist
When we first heard about Bob Taub, he was a concert pianist and inventor with some lofty goals. He saw his new technology - an analytical engine that can read sheet music and translate it into sound, or turn a performance into a musical score - as a way to transform how people learn and perform all kinds of music. For the moment, though, Taub may have to settle for something a bit more down to earth: creating a new app that Teen Vogue suggested may supplant Snapchat as teenagers' "new favorite thing.
REAL_ESTATE
February 10, 2013 | By Sally Friedman, For The Inquirer
The passion for collecting can be a happy diversion. It also can quickly turn into a space invader. And when you happen to own what is believed to be the largest private sheet-music collection in the world, as Sandy Marrone does, space becomes an overwhelming challenge. It all began 38 years ago, when Marrone was seeking a diversion beyond her work as a photojournalist for Penn Mutual in Philadelphia and as a new mother. She had energy to spare. Soon, passion turned into magnificent obsession, as the sheet-music collection morphed into a thriving business, with collectors flocking to her. Five years ago, when Sandy and her husband, Dennis, looked around at their two-story house in the Cinnamon Hill section of Cinnaminson, one word flashed: "Basement!"
ENTERTAINMENT
January 10, 2013 | By John Timpane, Inquirer Staff Writer
Tuesday night upstairs at World Cafe Live, a one-night Woodstock-in-a-phone-booth broke out, with the title "Philly Plays Song Reader : a New Album by Beck Hansen. " It was an introduction to both a major new album and to the local music scene, as 20 Philly-region acts played through the 20-plus songs of Beck's Song Reader . This disheveled hoot of a hootenanny left the packed, sweltering audience with two impressions: (1) Song Reader is full of various, witty, retro-futzing, often poetic songs, in an exciting and challenging new/old package; and (2)
ENTERTAINMENT
December 26, 2012 | By John Timpane, Inquirer Staff Writer
We did what the guy wanted. Beck, I mean. Beck Hansen. Singer, producer, experimentalist, pop devil. Beck has a new album, titled Song Reader. It's unlike any other. There is no CD. No download. No audio. As of this writing, you cannot hear Beck doing an authoritative, this-is-the-song performance. What is there? All the songs are offered - in sheet music. Want to hear them? (They're pretty fun.) Go get your guitar, piano, or ukulele, and play them. It's not so much an audio release as a publishing event.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 19, 2012 | By Linda Fowler, For The Inquirer
Name that Christmas tune and Ronald M. Clancy knows the story of its origin. He'll mention the composer and often the lyricist, arranger, or artists who have performed it. Pressed for more details, he'll reveal the label, estate, or recording company that holds the rights to the song. And he might even describe a great painting that he thinks captures its spirit. The Christmas-music historian, who lives in Lower Township, N.J., when he's not delving into library stacks around the country, is the founder of Christmas Classics Ltd. in Cape May, a company that sells thoughtfully compiled packages of holiday CDs, bound sheet music, and finely illustrated companion books.
NEWS
November 6, 2012 | By Sally A. Downey, Inquirer Staff Writer
Joseph Anthony Celano, 96, a music-shop owner who, as mayor of Hatboro from 1981 to 2005, married more than 2,000 couples, died Tuesday, Oct. 30, at Luther Woods Nursing & Rehabilitation Center in Hatboro. When Mr. Celano was elected mayor for the first time, he didn't belong to a political party, although he would become a Republican. After operating Hatboro Music Shop for 36 years, however, he knew everybody, he later told The Inquirer. Before the election, cars and vans drove around for weeks with unsolicited, homemade "Go With the Flow, Vote for Joe" signs.
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