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Shell Game

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NEWS
February 11, 1994
Many people, even frequent opponents, have described Gov. Casey as "compassionate. " His public pronouncements on topics like welfare have seemed to support that view. When governors of other states were looking to eliminate general assistance welfare to adults, Casey vowed the opposite. "I'll be damned if I'll tell the walking wounded of our society that we're going to throw you down the steps to find a job," he said in 1992. Even some members of the Legislative Black Caucus who walked out on Casey's budget message Tuesday - protesting "draconian" proposals to cut welfare - have referred to the governor as a man they knew to be compassionate.
NEWS
March 10, 1988 | By CYNTHIA BURTON, Daily News Staff Writer Staff writer Tyree Johnson contributed to this report
Henry Moore thought he was buying a house when he gave his money to real estate man Morris Geller. "He wanted to help me," remembered Moore, a retired maintenance man. Anyone watching the two negotiate the deal would have thought "we were in heaven," Moore said. But after months of hard work on the North Marston Street house - after replacing plumbing and windows, after painting and stuccoing - Moore learned the bitter truth: he had spent $1,200 on a house that wasn't his. Geller had no connection to the property he sold Moore, city records confirm.
NEWS
June 28, 2013
IT LOOKS as if Pennsylvanians have figured out Gov. Corbett's shell game. His "no new taxes" approach at the state level has led to a combination of deep cuts in the budgets of local school districts, plus a round of local tax increases to lessen the impact. The situation is true not just in Philadelphia, but in districts across the state. Voters in Pennsylvania are not happy with the situation. A statewide poll commissioned by Public CitizensĀ for Children and Youth and the Pennsylvania Center for Budget and Policy shows that voters are aware of the cuts.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 8, 1987 | By NELS NELSON, Daily News Staff Writer
A new one-hour weekly chase/adventure series with a Southern California locale but aspirations to international vagabonding bows tonight on the CBS network. "Shell Game," a kind of "Remington Steele" operating on both sides of the law, takes over Channel 10's 8-to-9 p.m. slot formerly shared by "Twilight Zone" (zapped) and "Simon & Simon" (moved to 9-10 p.m. as lead-in to "Knots Landing"). "Designing Women" (formerly 9:30-10 p.m.) is being placed "on hiatus," which is networkese for the taxi squad.
NEWS
October 18, 1986
The wandering shell game that passes for Philadelphia's quest to find a safe, long-term, affordable way to get rid of its trash has cranked up for fall. It's a ritual by now, like watching the playoffs. But it's not half as rewarding. In fact, it's one of the most costly spectator sports this city has ever seen. And if 1986 appeared to hold promise of conclusion, look again. Instead of biting the bullet, City Council wants to chase a few more rabbits. Let's talk about Rome. Mayor Goode and his deputies - trying to pry support from Council for a trash-to-steam plant at the Philadelphia Naval Shipyard - proposed an expense- paid tour of a small-scale version of the plant that recently began operating in environmentally conscious Oregon.
NEWS
March 15, 1989
More cops. That's what Philadelphians say they want. And that's what Mayor Goode has promised to give them. The mayor promised 400 more police this year, and 300 more in each of the next three years. With a price tag of $14 million for just the first 400, you might ask these questions: Just where the money will come from? Will the additional cops really materialize? How deeply will critical social programs be cut to pay the bill? Most important, will any of this folderol produce a better-policed city?
NEWS
September 16, 1986 | BY EDWARD JOHN HUDAK
Once in a while, I put aside my nagging skepticism about politics and politicians just long enough to pop my head up into the prevailing winds to see whether anything has changed. It was during one of these brief reconnaissance missions that I encountered U.S. Rep. James Florio, D-NJ, a longtime veteran of the toxic waste wars in the U.S. House of Representatives. Florio, a soft-spoken and thoughtful man, sat on an arm of a chair at a recent reception organized in his behalf, and we spoke about whether the country would survive Reagan and the conservatives.
NEWS
June 10, 1988 | By ROBERT STRAUSS, Daily News Staff Writer
There's a heavy female streetwalking problem in Sea Isle City. It appears about this time every year, just when the shore traffic starts getting heavier. Sometimes the results aren't pretty. About three years ago, the citizenry got up in arms about the streetwalkers. Actually, they took them in their own hands and started whisking them off. The streetwalkers of Sea Isle City are not your typical long-legged city kind, to be sure. In fact, these shore females have stumpy, scaly legs and pretty rough-looking exteriors.
NEWS
June 29, 1990 | By Michael Vitez, Inquirer Staff Writer
Heeeeeeeeeeelp! School's out! Kids at home. Nagging. Fighting. Whining. "Take me to the pool, Mom . . . I want to go to Sean's house and watch 'Ninja Turtles,' Dad. . . . Sorry, Mom, I left the gate open and the dog got away. . . . I want to go to the 7-Eleven, Dad. . . . Timmy changed the channel. Wahhhhhhhhhhh! . . . Sound familiar? Well, a local author and public-relations whiz has come up with a way to make these summertime blues a little more bearable. And she also has some suggestions for lightening up long car trips, baths, sick days, rainy days, bedtime, even time spent in waiting rooms.
BUSINESS
January 26, 2013 | By Mike Armstrong, Inquirer Columnist
When businesses threaten to move from city to suburbs or across state lines but just a short drive away, state economic-development offices spring into action in the name of saving or attracting jobs. Their carrot of choice may be a tax credit or an outright grant. Paying to retain jobs is an all-too-frequent practice, and it drives all sorts of diligent, taxpaying business people nuts. The Washington advocacy group Good Jobs First calls it a "fraudulent shell game. " It released a report Thursday that blasted several states for "pirating" jobs from other states, noting that in some areas, the use of incentives had increased during these slow job-creation times.
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NEWS
June 28, 2013
IT LOOKS as if Pennsylvanians have figured out Gov. Corbett's shell game. His "no new taxes" approach at the state level has led to a combination of deep cuts in the budgets of local school districts, plus a round of local tax increases to lessen the impact. The situation is true not just in Philadelphia, but in districts across the state. Voters in Pennsylvania are not happy with the situation. A statewide poll commissioned by Public CitizensĀ for Children and Youth and the Pennsylvania Center for Budget and Policy shows that voters are aware of the cuts.
BUSINESS
January 26, 2013 | By Mike Armstrong, Inquirer Columnist
When businesses threaten to move from city to suburbs or across state lines but just a short drive away, state economic-development offices spring into action in the name of saving or attracting jobs. Their carrot of choice may be a tax credit or an outright grant. Paying to retain jobs is an all-too-frequent practice, and it drives all sorts of diligent, taxpaying business people nuts. The Washington advocacy group Good Jobs First calls it a "fraudulent shell game. " It released a report Thursday that blasted several states for "pirating" jobs from other states, noting that in some areas, the use of incentives had increased during these slow job-creation times.
SPORTS
December 17, 2009
MONTY AND HIS Money Managers had themselves some week. They ran the greatest shell game since the days when big carnivals would roll into small towns, relieve the local yokels of the harvest money and move on. The carny sharpsters had a signal they would holler if one of them was caught in his con by a sharp-eyed citizen. "Hey, Rube," they would yell. Roustabouts would soon be beating on the trouble-maker. Hey, Ruben . . . From the minute he called trading for Roy Halladay "an unlikeliness," Phillies general manager Ruben Amaro and his carnies were running a double shell game with two American League clubs, the Toronto Blue Jays and rookie GM Alex Anthopoulos, and the Seattle Mariners and second-year GM Jack Zduriencik, guessing which of the six walnut shells would hide the slickly maneuvered peas.
NEWS
July 16, 2009 | By Stuart H. Shapiro
President Obama has made it clear that he wants to make monumental health-care reform one of the defining achievements of his administration. To this I say, "Bravo. " As a former aide to Sen. Edward M. Kennedy, I consider myself one of the many early toilers in this endeavor, and this dream has been shared and chased by many for decades. Unfortunately, though, some of the mechanisms the president has proposed to "pay for" expanding insurance are likely to tarnish his legacy - and leave millions of older Americans without quality long-term care.
NEWS
February 3, 2009
IT'S ENOUGH to make you sick. In fact, it may already have. So far, 550 cases of salmonella infection and eight deaths have been tied to products made with peanut butter from one Georgia plant, the Peanut Corp. of America. The stuff was used by about 100 companies in cookies, ice cream, crackers, snack bars and candy. More than 800 products have been pulled from store shelves so far and many people have given up eating peanut butter entirely. The true number of those who have gotten sick is probably much, much higher.
NEWS
December 8, 2008 | By Robert Strauss FOR THE INQUIRER
Kim Andrews had just helped a woman save a couple of hundred dollars on her new Medicare drug plan. "I asked her about her husband," said Andrews, the Delaware County coordinator for Apprise, the Pennsylvania health insurance counseling service. The woman said " 'Oh, my husband loves his plan. He won't change.' " "Well, I checked his drugs anyway, and it turns out his plan was no longer going to cover two of his drugs," Andrews said. "I found him another plan that would save him $2,771.
NEWS
June 29, 2005
Tax reform must be substantial, not a shell game I applaud groups like the Cherry Hill Committee for Property Tax Reform ("State needs a new property-tax system now," June 13) for helping to keep the focus on tax reform in New Jersey. But what I don't see are substantive ideas on how to achieve reform without merely redistributing the tax or blindly capping it. What we need is a more efficient process, not just a shell game. I have owned homes in Minnesota, Connecticut and now New Jersey in the last four years, and I've seen how other states provide services for less.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 23, 2004 | By Marilynn Marter INQUIRER FOOD WRITER
Now's the time for pumpkin carving in anticipation of Halloween, just a week away. To give novice carvers some pointers, we sought out jack-o'-lantern expert Chuck Feld of West Chester, who started carving pumpkins 22 years ago for the Chadds Ford Historical Society and whose talents are now a featured fall attraction at Longwood Gardens, the Hagley Museum, the Tyler Arboretum, and other places hosting pumpkin festivals and carving demonstrations....
NEWS
April 19, 2004 | By Froma Harrop
President Bush's proposal to end the "double taxation" of dividends was "simple, moral and innocent," Donald Luskin wrote a year ago on the National Review's Web site. Weeping into his keyboard, Luskin likened the plan to the idealistic James Stewart character in "Mr. Smith Goes to Washington. " The proposal, he said, "got corrupted, chewed up and spit out by the U.S. Senate. " Over at the Heritage Foundation, Daniel J. Mitchell was predicting that Americans would reject the "politics of hate-and-envy" and go for the Bush plan.
SPORTS
October 25, 2003 | By Ira Josephs INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Waves of boats, one after another, will be pouring down the Schuylkill today at the Thomas Eakins Head of the Schuylkill Regatta. It will be the 34th edition of the annual event that has become a Philadelphia tradition and the crown jewel of the city's fall rowing season. The action will begin at 7:40 a.m., with recreational and adaptive races, and continue until 5:15 p.m., when the championship eights will race. The 2.5-mile course will start just below the Girard Avenue Bridge and finish about 500 meters below the Twin Bridges.
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