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NEWS
May 10, 1986
Boss Hogg was envious. Here were those goldurned Duke boys racing around the countryside in that fancy car of theirs, making the sheriff look like a damfool. What to do? Ralph (Boss Hogg) Passio had an answer, according to sources close to the FBI's investigation of his Philadelphia sheriff's office. Mudflaps. Also power antennas and fancy car sound systems. Even a sheriff who doesn't know where he's going deserves to take his trips in style. A car is important to a Philadelphia sheriff.
NEWS
October 8, 1987
Close calls between good candidates for the same office are not common in Philadelphia politics. Often the choices are so bad that choosing one person to endorse is a painful process. That's why the race for Philadelphia sheriff is such a pleasure. Each candidate presents a rational, well-thought-out plan of action, and brings with him a dignity and professionalism non-existent during the reign of Sheriff Ralph "Boss Hogg" Passio 3rd. Both Democrat John Green and Republican Bill Cole have ample law enforcement experience and a sense of purpose that will be invaluable in running the office.
NEWS
June 19, 2015
RYAN BRIGGS' article on the city's vacant lot problem displayed little understanding of how the Sheriff's Office functions. He used outdated information to form erroneous conclusions. At no time did he call our office to obtain the facts. He assumed that the Sheriff's Office chooses the properties put up for foreclosure or tax sale. Properties are placed in sheriff's sales by the city for delinquent taxes or a mortgage lender seeking foreclosure. The sheriff is an arm of the court system who conducts the sales according to law and has no part in the selection process.
NEWS
September 14, 1986 | By S.A. Paolantonio, Inquirer Staff Writer
William Rowley, the undersheriff in Burlington County, leaned over his desk, fumbled through a few legal pads and budget documents, and began explaining his strategy to become the county's next sheriff. But then he became distracted. Pulling his huge frame from an undersized chair, Rowley turned to the dreary conditions in the Burlington County sheriff's office, a two-story brick building on High and Grant Streets in Mount Holly. "We're living in squalor here," Rowley said.
NEWS
April 24, 2003 | By Stephanie L. Arnold INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
He's getting more work for less money. And he's leaving a fairly stable job for one where, in two years, he will have to be elected to the post. But ask Edward J. Donnelly why he's leaving as chief of the Lower Southampton Police Department to become Bucks County sheriff and he will say simply: "It's something different. " From a captain in the Philadelphia Police Department to the head of the 29-member Southampton squad, the 37-year-veteran said he's just about seen it all. Except sheriff.
NEWS
May 9, 1986 | By S.A. Paolantonio, Inquirer Staff Writer
Surprising members of his party, Burlington County Sheriff Francis P. "Luke" Brennan said yesterday that he wants to be the chairman of the county Democratic committee. Brennan made the announcement four weeks before the scheduled election and days after county Democrats said Jack Shaw, a political fund-raiser for Rep. James J. Florio (D., N.J.), who had expressed interest in the chairmanship, would be right for the job. Shaw said Monday that he would wait until next week before deciding whether to run for the chairmanship.
NEWS
February 3, 2012
THERE IS AN equation in politics: Good news for one person is bad news for another. Former state Sen. T. Milton Street Sr. , fresh from federal prison last year when he challenged Mayor Nutter in the Democratic primary election, has dropped plans to run against state Rep. Michelle Brownlee for the 195th District seat representing the Strawberry Mansion, Powelton and Mantua area. Street tells us that, instead, he will seek the vacant House seat in the 197th District, which stretches from North Philly to East Falls.
NEWS
October 23, 1986 | By TYREE JOHNSON, Daily News Staff Writer
If the Mayor's Criminal Justice Coordinating Commission had its way, Ralph C. Passio III, the accountant from South Philadelphia, would be the last elected Philadelphia sheriff. The commission voted 16-1 yesterday to ask that the 290-person sheriff's office be reformed and the sheriff be appointed by the mayor rather than elected. The vote means the commission, an advisory panel composed of nearly all major city officials involved in the criminal justice system and chaired by Mayor Goode, will ask City Council to put the matter to the voters.
NEWS
July 31, 1986 | By Christopher Hepp, Inquirer Staff Writer
A group of the city's top criminal justice officials yesterday tentatively endorsed a move to make the Philadelphia sheriff an appointed rather than elected position. The Mayor's Criminal Justice Coordinating Commission, which is composed of officials from city criminal justice agencies, voted 9-6 in favor of having future Philadelphia sheriffs selected by appointment rather than by election. The same group voted to suggest reorganizing rather than abolishing the sheriff's office, which has been the subject of investigations by the FBI and City Council into payments for car repairs from petty-cash funds and alleged improprieties involving sheriff's foreclosure sales.
NEWS
April 4, 2012 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
CENTENNIAL, COLO. - A former Colorado sheriff known for his crusade against youth drug-use pleaded guilty Tuesday to charges of trading methamphetamine for sex. Patrick Sullivan was sentenced to 38 days in jail, with credit for eight days already served, and two years of probation for felony possession of methamphetamine and a misdemeanor count of solicitation for prostitution. He must pay $1,100 in penalties. He was the sheriff in Arapahoe County from 1984 until 2002, when he resigned to become security director of the Cherry Creek School District.
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NEWS
March 7, 2016 | By Clark DeLeon
Father Judge High School sits on a peninsula created by a dramatic northwest turn of the Pennypack Creek, as if the stream suddenly remembered from a couple of blocks away that it owed Frankford Avenue money. The campus fronts Solly Avenue on the south bank of the Pennypack. North and west of the Pennypack, the Northeast is infested with cul-de-sacs and loop streets that lead back onto themselves like a child's concentric circle puzzle. Only a cop or a fireman could navigate those streets, and guess who lives there?
NEWS
January 16, 2016
Ex-Sheriff Green's codefendant: I'm innocent A codefendant charged in a fraud conspiracy with former Philadelphia Sheriff John D. Green pleaded not guilty Thursday during his arraignment before a federal magistrate judge. James Davis, 65, of Wyncote, Montgomery County, who co-owned advertising and title-search companies, is accused of illegally obtaining near-exclusive control of business connected with the Sheriff's Office's sales of foreclosed properties between 2002 and 2010.
NEWS
December 20, 2015 | By Jeremy Roebuck, Staff Writer
Former Philadelphia Sheriff John D. Green's two decades in office were plagued by troubling audits and allegations from city and state watchdogs of cronyism, mismanagement, and fraud. On Friday, federal authorities added a new wrinkle to the legacy of the retired lawman, accusing him of taking bribes worth six figures from a top campaign donor and friend who was granted a virtual stranglehold over $115 million in Sheriff's Office contracts. Prosecutors allege that Green, 68, all but handed over the reins of one of the major duties of his office - managing court-ordered sales of foreclosed properties - to advertising and title firms owned by James R. Davis Jr., 65, of Wyncote.
NEWS
December 20, 2015 | By Robert Moran, Staff Writer
John D. Green first ran for the office of Philadelphia sheriff in 1987 as a reformer. His predecessor, Ralph C. Passio III, had earned an almost comical reputation for running a dysfunctional department. Passio chose not to run for reelection, and the Democratic Party backed a new candidate. That candidate was not Green, a former Philadelphia police sergeant who had been president of the Guardian Civic League, an organization of black officers. But Green beat the party. A Simon Gratz High School graduate with a bachelor's degree from Temple University, he was endorsed by The Inquirer for his "commitment to reforming the Sheriff's Department.
NEWS
November 28, 2015 | By Michael Boren, Inquirer Staff Writer
As a rookie Camden police officer in 1969, Gilbert "Whip" Wilson responded to the slaying of two officers, rushing one of the mortally wounded men to the hospital in the backseat of a cruiser. Years later, in North Camden, Wilson opened fire on a man who shot at him with a rifle in a second-floor bedroom, sending a bullet into the man's abdomen. "He missed," Wilson said. "But I didn't. " The experiences showed Wilson the fragility of life, both angering and sickening him. But his outlook on policing stayed the same: Not everyone is a criminal, he said, just the select few causing problems.
NEWS
November 27, 2015 | By Michaelle Bond, Inquirer Staff Writer
When the sheriff of Chester County, S.C., sits down to Thanksgiving dinner, he will be surrounded by family, and to him that includes a 10-year-old boy from Chester County, Pa., he met last year. "It's just like he's mine, just like my own son," Sheriff Alex "Big A" Underwood said. The pair met after Alex Collins, now nicknamed "Little A," wrote a letter to Underwood asking to go on his annual hunting trip with area children. Alex, who lives in West Goshen Township, read about the outing on Facebook and never imagined there was more than one Chester County.
NEWS
September 23, 2015 | By Claudia Vargas, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Republican running for Philadelphia sheriff is asking the FBI and the U.S. Attorney's Office to investigate campaign donations and overtime pay in Sheriff Jewell Williams' office. In a news release, Christopher Sawyer said he wrote Monday to the federal agencies asking them to scrutinize the pattern of donations and overtime pay described in Sunday's Inquirer. The newspaper reported that nearly all the top recent earners of overtime in Williams' office had donated to his campaign fund.
NEWS
September 21, 2015 | By Claudia Vargas, Inquirer Staff Writer
Call it a coincidence: Some of the biggest earners of overtime pay in the Philadelphia Sheriff's Department also contributed to their boss' political campaign fund. Sheriff Jewell Williams, elected in 2011 as a reformer, says those deputies' campaign donations had nothing to do with their overtime earnings and everything to do with his leadership. "People support you when they feel good," Williams said in an interview. His chief finance officer, Benjamin L. Hayllar, said: "There's no quid pro quo here.
NEWS
July 31, 2015 | By Ronnie Polaneczky, Daily News Columnist
RON WALKER has a strong back for a 68-year-old man. What's bending it in half is the weight of owing thousands of dollars to Hahnemann University Hospital, where he's being treated for prostate cancer. "Once a week, the bill collectors call. I say, 'I can't pay you yet,' " says Walker, sitting in his kitchen, showing me neat rows of financial figures he tracks in a copy book. "They say, 'We'll call you again next week.' It keeps me up at night. " Walker's bills total about $23,000 - almost the exact amount, ironically, that he's owed by the Philadelphia Sheriff's Office for the 2012 sale of a house he owned in South Philly.
NEWS
June 19, 2015
RYAN BRIGGS' article on the city's vacant lot problem displayed little understanding of how the Sheriff's Office functions. He used outdated information to form erroneous conclusions. At no time did he call our office to obtain the facts. He assumed that the Sheriff's Office chooses the properties put up for foreclosure or tax sale. Properties are placed in sheriff's sales by the city for delinquent taxes or a mortgage lender seeking foreclosure. The sheriff is an arm of the court system who conducts the sales according to law and has no part in the selection process.
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