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Sherlock Holmes

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ENTERTAINMENT
May 14, 2013 | By Toby Zinman, For The Inquirer
Spoofing Sherlock Holmes and Dr. Watson isn't exactly a novel notion, although this Curio Theatre parody of The Hound of the Baskervilles by Steven Canny and John Nicholson gives elementary a whole new meaning. If you stick it out until Act Two, things suddenly get funny. Steve Carpenter, who's been playing Sherlock Holmes with an off-again, on-again Russian accent, is outraged to learn that somebody has tweeted during intermission, complaining that his performance is really slowing the show down.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 26, 1986 | By Richard Fuller, Special to The Inquirer
Let's play the "What's in a Name?" game. By now, one and all must know exactly what to expect from Sir Arthur Conan Doyle: the grandest detective of them all, Sherlock Holmes. Bantam Classics has reissued the whole canon in two fat, handsome paperbacks, Sherlock Holmes: The Complete Novels and Stories, Volumes I and II (Bantam, $4.95 each). The covers alone, black-and- white photographs lightly tinted, are invitation enough to enter the game. At 924 and 662 pages, respectively, these have to be the paperback bargains of this or any other week.
NEWS
October 22, 1992 | By Cheryl Squadrito, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
It's the turn of the century. An English manor house on the moor is plagued by the Baskerville curse. A demonic hound is killing people living in the countryside. Or is the killer human? Inheritances, insect collections and shifty eyes have roles in The Hound of the Baskervilles, which premiered at Hedgerow Theater in Rose Valley. The mystery, a Tim Kelly adaptation of the Sir Arthur Conan Doyle original, is suspenseful yet spiced with humor and wit. "Master of detection" Sherlock Holmes, portrayed by a young-looking Paul Kuhn, spouts dry one-liners.
NEWS
October 8, 2012 | By Howard Shapiro, Inquirer Staff Writer
From: Mr. Sherlock Holmes To: Dr. Watson I say, my dear Watson, we can make immediate deductions from our visit to Sherlock Holmes and the Crucifer of Blood at the indubitably pleasant Hedgerow Theatre in Rose Valley - you know, just down the lane from the county town they call Media. First off, the play by Paul Giovanni - the same one that featured Glenn Close as the female lead on Broadway in 1978 and Charlton Heston as myself in that 1991 telly movie - is loose as the ashes in my pipe bowl.
NEWS
November 18, 1988 | By Edgar Williams, Inquirer Staff Writer
The question may arise today. Someone in his scholarly audience at Philosophical Hall may ask William Smith whether he would like to conduct an orchestra of which Sherlock Holmes was a member. The answer would be an emphatic no. But not for reasons one would most likely suppose. "Nothing against Holmes' musicianship," Smith, associate conductor of the Philadelphia Orchestra, was saying before a rehearsal yesterday at the Academy of Music. "He was a good violinist. It's simply that he would know the score better than I would.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 11, 2009 | By JEROME MAIDA For the Daily News
If there is one element missing from the comics shelves these days, it is a good mystery. This is interesting considering that the two major properties translated to the big screen this year - "Watchmen" and "Wolverine" - are based on the genre. With "Watchmen," it's the search for the manipulator behind the scenes; with "Wolverine," it's a journey to rediscover his past. But in retrospect, the mysteries were unsatisfying. "Watchmen's" mastermind turned out to be the only hero who survived an assassination attempt.
NEWS
September 30, 1990 | By Cynthia J. McGroarty, Special to The Inquirer
They didn't come to bury Moriarty. How could they? His body was somewhere at the bottom of a Swiss waterfall. They didn't come to praise him, although they paid grudging respect to his genius, evil though it was. No, they came to snicker at his effigy, laid out on Joan Kerins' dining room table, covered with a white tablecloth and looking pretty ridiculous in a cardboard skull mask. "He's been dead at least 12 hours," pronounced Dr. Watson, who surveyed the corpse. The merry mourners laughed.
NEWS
December 24, 2009 | By Steven Rea, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
The game is not afoot. Sherlock Holmes , with a ripped Robert Downey Jr. in the title role and Lock, Stock and Two Smoking Barrels ' Guy Ritchie at the controls, presents Arthur Conan Doyle's celebrated consulting detective in a new light. No longer the wiry icon in houndstooth cape coat and deerstalker, the reimagined Holmes is a moody, muscular figure, an action hero who dashes around grimy old London town in 1891 dodging fireballs and exiting edifices in great haste - once by diving headlong into the Thames.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 23, 2009 | By GARY THOMPSON, thompsg@phillynews.com 215-854-5992
SHERLOCK HOLMES liked to say that his unique method of investigation was based on the observation of trifles. The new screen version of the venerable movie staple is based on an observation of its own - that no franchise will nowadays succeed without the enthusiastic support of young males. And so Holmes (Robert Downey Jr.), before he has a chance to make a single brilliant deduction, is tossed into a bare-knuckle brawl with a hairy heavyweight. The scene takes us inside Holmes' head, where he uses his big brain to plot out the sequence of athletic maneuvers that will allow him to duck a punch, break the man's knee, crack his rib, puncture his kidney.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 29, 1988 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
Which recordings should a serious Sherlock Holmes-ophile listen to? There are so many tapes from so many publishers that the solution is anything but elementary. The world's most famous detective, of 221B Baker Street in London, appeared in 56 short stories and three novels. Once the game's afoot, not a moment is lost in introducing the faithful Dr. Watson, the inept Inspector Lestrade and those liter-size helpers, the Baker Street Irregulars. One of the newest offerings is Simon & Schuster's re-release of The New Adventures of Sherlock Holmes radio broadcasts that began in 1945, starring Basil Rathbone as Holmes and Nigel Bruce as Watson.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 6, 2015 | By Toby Zinman, For The Inquirer
The game is afoot (What, only a foot? I thought it was Scotland Yard) at the Lantern Theater, where The Hound of the Baskervilles is having a rousing and rambunctious production. The comedy by Steven Canny and John Nicholson, under Matt Pfeiffer's direction - a triumph of comic timing - is laugh-out-loud, eye-moppingly funny. This is the same absurdly complicated Sherlock Holmes mystery written by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle: threats on the heir's life at Baskerville Hall, with half a dozen red-herring suspects stirred into the mix. Add the spooky mansion (cue the door slams)
ENTERTAINMENT
March 19, 2015 | By Toby Zinman, For The Inquirer
PRINCETON -- Ken Ludwig's new comedy is a farcical treatment of the most famous of the Sherlock Holmes stories, The Hound of the Baskervilles . As we know from Sir Arthur Conan Doyle himself, from Benedict Cumberbatch's fast-talking reincarnation of the famous detective in the BBC's Sherlock , and from Jonny Lee Miller's intense, neurotic portrayal in CBS's Elementary , the whole point of Sherlock Holmes is that he is super smart. So how did he wind up in this dopey play?
NEWS
November 6, 2014 | The Inquirer Staff
Taylor the great and powerful Welp, she did it. As everyone knew she would. In its very first week of general availability, the album 1989 by Wyomissing's own Taylor Swift enjoyed about 1.287 million in sales, splaying her atop the Billboard Top 200 album chart. That's a-MAY-zing in these days of dying album sales - that any album would sell a million total, let alone in its first week. It's the biggest-selling album released this year, after just one week!, eclipsing Sam Smith 's In the Lonely Hour , which has sold a comparatively stinky 744,000.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 18, 2014 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
They make up more than half the world's population, yet women have not yet taken their rightful place in Hollywood as directors. Not that there's a paucity of brilliant female directors, as is evident from Female Gaze: Contemporary Films by Women , an impressive seven-disc boxed set featuring seven feature films and seven shorts by contemporary female directors from around the world. Inch'Allah Dimanche , by Algerian French artist and politician Yamina Benguigui, is about a woman from the former French colony of Algeria who joins her husband in France, where he emigrated more than 25 years earlier.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 18, 2013 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Western society's most significant advances in crime detection didn't come from a police force or a pioneering scientist. They came from a fictional character, Sherlock Holmes. That's the claim made by PBS's How Sherlock Changed the World , a two-hour documentary airing at 9 p.m. Tuesday, with narration by The Walking Dead 's Andrew Lincoln in a smooth, seductive, for-real British accent. A repetitive, highly selective scavenger hunt through Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's Holmes oeuvre that tends to be more exhausting than exhaustive, the show strategically leads the way for two returning Holmes dramas.
NEWS
October 18, 2013 | BY HOWARD GENSLER, Daily News Staff Writer gensleh@phillynews.com, 215-854-5678
AS JOURNALISM tries to re-create itself as a viable institution in the age of the Internet, nowhere has the battle between its traditional values and the changes forced on it by technology been as clear-cut as in the case of WikiLeaks and its charismatic founder, Julian Assange. In "The Fifth Estate," director Bill Condon and screenwriter Josh Singer attempt to explore the psychological making of Assange (played by Benedict Cumberbatch) and his relationship with his Wiki right hand, Daniel Domscheit-Berg (Daniel Bruhl)
ENTERTAINMENT
May 14, 2013 | By Toby Zinman, For The Inquirer
Spoofing Sherlock Holmes and Dr. Watson isn't exactly a novel notion, although this Curio Theatre parody of The Hound of the Baskervilles by Steven Canny and John Nicholson gives elementary a whole new meaning. If you stick it out until Act Two, things suddenly get funny. Steve Carpenter, who's been playing Sherlock Holmes with an off-again, on-again Russian accent, is outraged to learn that somebody has tweeted during intermission, complaining that his performance is really slowing the show down.
NEWS
October 8, 2012 | By Howard Shapiro, Inquirer Staff Writer
From: Mr. Sherlock Holmes To: Dr. Watson I say, my dear Watson, we can make immediate deductions from our visit to Sherlock Holmes and the Crucifer of Blood at the indubitably pleasant Hedgerow Theatre in Rose Valley - you know, just down the lane from the county town they call Media. First off, the play by Paul Giovanni - the same one that featured Glenn Close as the female lead on Broadway in 1978 and Charlton Heston as myself in that 1991 telly movie - is loose as the ashes in my pipe bowl.
NEWS
September 28, 2012 | By David Hiltbrand, INQUIRER TV WRITER
Thursday night - time to roll out the networks' big guns, literally and literarily. ABC opens with Last Resort , perhaps the most ambitious and expensive-looking new series of the season, and a program whose mature and violent content seems ill-suited to the 8 p.m. slot. The captain (Andre Braugher) and crew of a dreadnought ballistic Navy sub get an authenticated missile launch code. When both Braugher and his commanding officer ( Underworld 's Scott Speedman) have qualms about heaving nuclear warheads at Pakistan, their sub is targeted for destruction.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 27, 2012
* LAST RESORT. 8 p.m. Thursday, 6 ABC. * ELEMENTARY. 10 p.m. Thursday, CBS 3. SOMEONE'S OUT to get the USS Colorado. Placed in the most precarious of positions in the Thursday premiere of ABC's "Last Resort," the submariners aboard don't have much going for them, beyond nuclear missiles and a captain, Marcus Chaplin (Andre Braugher), who knows how to use them. If he's smart, he'll keep a couple trained on those head-of-the-class clowns on CBS' "The Big Bang Theory," and maybe reserve another for Fox's "The X Factor.
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