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Shirley Horn

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ENTERTAINMENT
October 1, 1993 | By Jack Lloyd, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A veteran singer/pianist who has attained major success in recent years after two decades of oblivion - Shirley Horn - and one of the newest female vocalists to arrive on the jazz scene - Nnenna Freelon - are performing here this weekend. Both entertainers have new albums, and - as is often the case with jazz recordings - both rely heavily on the standards and other classic tunes. Horn's new release is unique. It is inspired by Ray Charles, who is known more as an R & B genius than a jazz musician.
NEWS
June 19, 1992 | By Tom Moon, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
It's amazing how a little bit of show business can break a trance. Wednesday at the Academy of Music, in a Mellon PSFS Jazz Festival concert that was conceived in Tin Pan Alley heaven, vocalist and pianist Shirley Horn, bassist Charles Ables and drummer Steve Williams achieved a peerless group empathy early in the set, and sustained it through a program of substantially re-invented standards. They painted expansive ballads such as "Soothe Me" as if in slow motion - Horn's voice teased out each line with a patient, passionate restraint that lingered over every nuance.
NEWS
February 6, 1998 | by Jonathan Takiff, Daily News Staff Writer
Look up the definition of "class act" in a jazz dictionary, and you'll find Shirley Horn listed. An old-school, cabaret-spawned jazz pianist and singer, Horn has made a mark on the international music scene for four decades with the exceedingly good taste of her material and the subtle, understated restraint of her performance - now more popular than ever. "Maybe I've gotten better through the years. At least I hope so," Horn mused modestly in our recent phone conversation prompted by her headlining gig at the Peco Jazz Festival finale, Feb. 15 at the Annenberg Center's Zellerbach Theater.
NEWS
September 30, 1993 | By Pheralyn Dove, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Jazz pianist and singer Shirley Horn was wearing thin last week from a frenetic schedule in Rio de Janeiro that had her shifting gears between performances, a news conference, receptions and rehearsals. Just as she was attempting to sneak in a catnap in her hotel room in Rio, the telephone rang, reminding her of an interview that had been scheduled. Sounding groggy and unsteady, Horn almost opted to forgo the interview. But within a few seconds, she perked up and reconsidered.
NEWS
June 24, 1991 | JUANA ANDERSON/ DAILY NEWS
Trumpeter Miles Davis, a genius of jazz for four decades, performs last night at the Academy of Music in the windup to the Mellon PSFS Jazz Festival. Joining him on the bill was Shirley Horn.
NEWS
April 14, 2012 | By Dan Moberger, Inquirer Staff Writer
George Mesterhazy, 58, of Cape May, a Hungarian-born, Grammy-nominated jazz musician, died at home in his sleep early Thursday of what longtime life partner Vicki Watson called natural causes. Mesterhazy's selfless attitude when playing and composing music made him the perfect fit for renowned jazz singers for decades. He translated this musical quality into everyday life, leaving a legacy of generosity on and off the bandstand. "He is, by far, the most inspirational piano player I've ever worked with," said cabaret and jazz singer Paula Johns, with whom Mesterhazy worked for more than 20 years.
NEWS
June 14, 2001 | By Tom Moon INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Deep into the third chorus of Randy Weston's "Hi Fly" Tuesday night at Zanzibar Blue, after Shirley Horn had toyed with the blues and played tense chordal clusters in a Thelonious Monk mood, she served up 16 perfect measures of jazz piano. It wasn't a particularly technical display, just block chords snapped out cleanly and quietly, with serene precision. Each time she repeated the phrase, she pushed a little more insistently against the rhythm, creating hiccups of syncopation that sent bassist Charles Ables and drummer Steve Williams scurrying down unexpected avenues.
NEWS
June 25, 1991 | By Francis Davis, Special to The Inquirer
Including his show Sunday at the Academy of Music, trumpeter Miles Davis has performed at four consecutive Mellon Jazz Festivals. This year, the festival was renamed Mellon PSFS, but Davis added nothing new. When not striking chords on a synthesizer, he was stalking the stage while coaching his six-man band and stabbing at melodies on his horn. He played several high-voltage blues, the title tune from his 1986 album Tutu, and his versions of Scritti Politti's "Perfect Way," Michael Jackson's "Human Nature" and Cyndi Lauper's "Time After Time.
NEWS
June 14, 1991 | by Nels Nelson, Daily News Staff Writer
Shirley Horn's hot as a firecracker, a jazz sensation. It's a new experience for a matronly lady in her middle 50s who, given her druthers, hints she'd sometimes rather be tending her azaleas and enjoying her grandsons in the tree-shaded Washington, D.C., neighborhood called Woodridge. Shirley Horn sings in an exquisitely soulful style often reminiscent of Billie Holiday at her best, accompanying herself at a bluesy piano blending artfully with her vocalizing. She's been at it for well over 30 years, and for much of that time had created barely a ripple in terms of public acclaim beyond the warm encomiums of her fellow musicians.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 8, 2001 | By A.D. Amorosi FOR THE INQUIRER
As the Mellon Jazz Festival unfolds, its mixed bag of mood-swinging music - cinematic trumpeter Terence Blanchard, honorees "Papa" John & Joey DeFrancesco, Pat Martino - reveals a trick bag within. Space-funk, including Sun Ra's Arkestra and George Clinton's angular R & B, makes Mellon intergalactic. And if space is really the place, singer-pianist Shirley Horn is queen of the galaxy, thanks to her sauntering melody. Horn performs Tuesday - the first night of Mellon, which runs through June 17 - and Wednesday.
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NEWS
April 14, 2012 | By Dan Moberger, Inquirer Staff Writer
George Mesterhazy, 58, of Cape May, a Hungarian-born, Grammy-nominated jazz musician, died at home in his sleep early Thursday of what longtime life partner Vicki Watson called natural causes. Mesterhazy's selfless attitude when playing and composing music made him the perfect fit for renowned jazz singers for decades. He translated this musical quality into everyday life, leaving a legacy of generosity on and off the bandstand. "He is, by far, the most inspirational piano player I've ever worked with," said cabaret and jazz singer Paula Johns, with whom Mesterhazy worked for more than 20 years.
NEWS
June 14, 2001 | By Tom Moon INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Deep into the third chorus of Randy Weston's "Hi Fly" Tuesday night at Zanzibar Blue, after Shirley Horn had toyed with the blues and played tense chordal clusters in a Thelonious Monk mood, she served up 16 perfect measures of jazz piano. It wasn't a particularly technical display, just block chords snapped out cleanly and quietly, with serene precision. Each time she repeated the phrase, she pushed a little more insistently against the rhythm, creating hiccups of syncopation that sent bassist Charles Ables and drummer Steve Williams scurrying down unexpected avenues.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 8, 2001 | By A.D. Amorosi FOR THE INQUIRER
As the Mellon Jazz Festival unfolds, its mixed bag of mood-swinging music - cinematic trumpeter Terence Blanchard, honorees "Papa" John & Joey DeFrancesco, Pat Martino - reveals a trick bag within. Space-funk, including Sun Ra's Arkestra and George Clinton's angular R & B, makes Mellon intergalactic. And if space is really the place, singer-pianist Shirley Horn is queen of the galaxy, thanks to her sauntering melody. Horn performs Tuesday - the first night of Mellon, which runs through June 17 - and Wednesday.
NEWS
February 6, 1998 | by Jonathan Takiff, Daily News Staff Writer
Look up the definition of "class act" in a jazz dictionary, and you'll find Shirley Horn listed. An old-school, cabaret-spawned jazz pianist and singer, Horn has made a mark on the international music scene for four decades with the exceedingly good taste of her material and the subtle, understated restraint of her performance - now more popular than ever. "Maybe I've gotten better through the years. At least I hope so," Horn mused modestly in our recent phone conversation prompted by her headlining gig at the Peco Jazz Festival finale, Feb. 15 at the Annenberg Center's Zellerbach Theater.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 1, 1993 | By Jack Lloyd, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A veteran singer/pianist who has attained major success in recent years after two decades of oblivion - Shirley Horn - and one of the newest female vocalists to arrive on the jazz scene - Nnenna Freelon - are performing here this weekend. Both entertainers have new albums, and - as is often the case with jazz recordings - both rely heavily on the standards and other classic tunes. Horn's new release is unique. It is inspired by Ray Charles, who is known more as an R & B genius than a jazz musician.
NEWS
September 30, 1993 | By Pheralyn Dove, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Jazz pianist and singer Shirley Horn was wearing thin last week from a frenetic schedule in Rio de Janeiro that had her shifting gears between performances, a news conference, receptions and rehearsals. Just as she was attempting to sneak in a catnap in her hotel room in Rio, the telephone rang, reminding her of an interview that had been scheduled. Sounding groggy and unsteady, Horn almost opted to forgo the interview. But within a few seconds, she perked up and reconsidered.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 28, 1993 | By Tom Moon, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Jazz tradition can be suffocating. Vocalist and pianist Shirley Horn, whose career was reborn in 1987 after a 20-year hiatus from touring, was probably obliged at some point to record a "songbook" devoted to the works of a single composer. Virtually every jazz diva does at least one: In her prime, Ella Fitzgerald made such tributes the focus of her career. But Horn, who will appear with her trio Saturday at the Keswick Theatre, has never been one for the obvious. She's built her reputation unearthing long-forgotten songs, and interpreting them with enough conviction to make them standards.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 19, 1993 | By Jack Lloyd, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
At age 58, singer/pianist Shirley Horn is hotter than ever. It's a "comeback" that began in 1988 and just kept growing. And it's a comeback Horn was not especially seeking at the time. Horn, who will appear Sunday afternoon in a free concert at Swarthmore College, had her first taste of fame in 1960, when her debut album was released. Miles Davis was so impressed that he asked her to perform with him at the Village Vanguard in New York. She went on a roll from there, playing in major jazz clubs throughout the country.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 5, 1993 | By Sam Wood, FOR THE INQUIRER Lesley Valdes and Karl Stark contributed
While most pop-music commentators have been putting together lists of what they consider the top 10 pop albums of 1992, I've been cleaning house. Until yesterday I lived under an unruly mountain of CDs and cassettes. Today I don't. After I sifted through the 300-plus pounds of CDs, cassettes and vinyl I received in 1992, only four pounds remained. And of those, only three saw heavy play on the already overtaxed CD player last year: Horn's Here's to Life (Verve/Polygram), Madonna's Erotica (Maverick/Sire)
NEWS
June 19, 1992 | By Tom Moon, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
It's amazing how a little bit of show business can break a trance. Wednesday at the Academy of Music, in a Mellon PSFS Jazz Festival concert that was conceived in Tin Pan Alley heaven, vocalist and pianist Shirley Horn, bassist Charles Ables and drummer Steve Williams achieved a peerless group empathy early in the set, and sustained it through a program of substantially re-invented standards. They painted expansive ballads such as "Soothe Me" as if in slow motion - Horn's voice teased out each line with a patient, passionate restraint that lingered over every nuance.
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