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Shiva

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NEWS
August 14, 1993 | By Amy S. Rosenberg, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The chancellor of the Philadelphia Bar Association yesterday criticized a federal judge's refusal to delay a trial last month so that one of the attorneys could mourn his mother's death in the manner required by Jewish law. "It showed a lack of sensitivity to a very personal loss that trial counsel had suffered," said Andre L. Dennis of the action by U.S. District Judge Robert F. Kelly during the highly publicized Richard Glanton-Kathleen Frederick...
NEWS
December 26, 2013
An obituary in Tuesday's Inquirer listed the incorrect time for Shiva to be observed for Robert "Bob" Jawer. Shiva will be observed at his home from noon to 9 p.m. on Wednesday. Also, the first name of Mr. Jawer's wife, Helene, was omitted.
NEWS
December 8, 2013 | By Edith Newhall, For The Inquirer
Walking into Arcadia University Art Gallery, one can almost feel a magnetic pull from the 34 contemporary Shiva linga paintings that line the gallery's three inner walls. And no wonder: The lovely, peculiar little painting with the ovoid - some might say lozenge - shape at its center has the centuries-old distinction of being the supreme meditation tool, capable of capturing a viewer's attention so completely that all other thoughts are temporarily banished from the mind. (Later, the viewer will be able to visualize the image at will.)
NEWS
March 13, 2014 | By John Timpane, Inquirer Staff Writer
Wednesday is the birthday of the World Wide Web. It's 25, a generation old. Together with the Internet, on which it works, it's the most ambiguous invention in human history. The Web/Internet is Shiva: god of creation, god of destruction. It has birthed a world once unimaginable. Robert Thompson, professor of television and popular culture at Syracuse University, says everyone has "the power to access and use others' information, and to produce our own, and send it around the world.
NEWS
March 14, 2004 | By Chris Satullo
Here's my problem with America's now-raging debate on the economy: Not enough Hinduism. I'm a churchgoer myself. But I have to concede this: Christianity, in its simplistic (i.e., political) form, is prone to binary thinking: good/evil, white hat/black hat. Applied to the economy, this habit leads many folks to cling to specious couplets: corporations bad/unions good; tax cuts good/social spending bad. Think, by contrast, of Hindu philosophy. One of the chief Hindu gods is a fellow named Shiva.
NEWS
August 5, 1993 | By Amy S. Rosenberg, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In a move that has drawn outrage and criticism, the federal judge presiding over the Richard Glanton-Kathleen Frederick sexual harassment trial refused a request by Frederick's attorney to allow him time to observe the traditional Jewish mourning period for his mother's death. U.S. District Judge Robert F. Kelly denied the request despite appeals from attorney Alan Lerner's rabbi and other lawyers and judges on July 28, the day Esther Lerner was buried. Lerner requested last Thursday and Friday off to be with his family during the mourning period at home required by Jewish law, known as sitting shiva.
NEWS
August 20, 2013 | By Sulaiman Abdur-Rahman, Inquirer Staff Writer
  Joseph Alberstadt, 86, a retired businessman who loved to travel the world, died Saturday, Aug. 17, at the Keystone House in Wyndmoor after a brief illness. His health had deteriorated after a recent fall. Mr. Alberstadt was an auctioneer and owner of Lionel Office Equipment, and he also volunteered for Learning Ally, an organization that makes reading accessible for the blind and dyslexic. Mr. Alberstadt's relatives say he was perhaps best known for his voracious appetite for traveling with his wife, Frances Klein Alberstadt, who died three years ago. "He and his late wife really knew how to have fun and a good time," said Harold Wolpert, one of Mr. Alberstadt's nephews.
NEWS
November 13, 2010 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Morton Krase was a Philadelphia Municipal Court judge and ardent Phillies fan. So after his funeral Sunday, Nov. 14, his family expects to sit shiva, not at home, as do many Jewish families. The Krase family was planning to be at the Hall of Fame Club at Citizens Bank Park in South Philadelphia, sitting shiva from 2 to 6 p.m. "He loved baseball," his daughter-in-law Christie Krase said. A season-ticket holder, he went to the ballpark for about 30 games each year. Judge Krase, 76, of Center City, died Thursday, Nov. 11, at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital of complications from multiple myeloma.
NEWS
July 11, 1996 | By Marc Kaufman, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
At some point during the chaotic war years of the 1970s and 1980s, a 1,000-year-old bust of Shiva was separated from its sculpted sandstone body near the ancient city of Angkor. The 16-inch head was a priceless treasure, one of hundreds of sculptures looted from the legendary site. The mystery of where Shiva's head went has now been solved. But how it left Angkor Wat and reemerged halfway around the world has yet to be revealed. Since 1985, the bust has been in the collection of that Western temple of sophisticated art, New York's Metropolitan Museum of Art. It was not until April, three years after the Angkor Conservancy distributed a catalog with photos of 100 pieces of stolen art, that the Met acknowledged owning the bust.
NEWS
February 19, 1989 | By Rich Henson, Inquirer Staff Writer
Frank J. Jacquinto, 70, a well-known and controversial Germantown businessman and landlord, died Friday at Graduate Hospital. Born in Philadelphia, Mr. Jacquinto lived in Germantown all but the last several years of his life, which he spent in Chestnut Hill. Though he never attended high school, he possessed strong business savvy and at one point owned more than 39 residential and commercial properties in the city. His best-known ventures were Frank's Junk Shop, which operated for years on Rittenhouse Street; Frank's, a bar and restaurant on Germantown Avenue that Mr. Jacquinto sold last year, and the Germantown Republican Club, a private club on Germantown Avenue in Chestnut Hill.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 28, 2014 | By Toby Zinman, For The Inquirer
In his memoir, Timebends , Arthur Miller writes of his first marriage, to Mary Slattery: "There was a deep shadow then over intermarriage between Jews and gentiles. . . . I was struggling to identify myself with mankind rather than one small tribal fraction of it. " And so Willy Loman was Everyman, not EveryJew. Until now. Under Lane Savadove's direction, EgoPo's passionate production of Miller's classic Death of a Salesman reimagines the Lomans as a Jewish family. The production starts with sitting shiva after Willy's suicide, making the entire play a backward look.
NEWS
September 19, 2014 | BY HOWARD GENSLER, Daily News Staff Writer gensleh@phillynews.com, 215-854-5678
DIRECTOR Shawn Levy (the super-successful "Night at the Museum" series) cashed in some of his studio good will to make "This Is Where I Leave You," a modestly budgeted comedy-drama in which adults speak with one another and nothing blows up. There were a number of things in Levy's favor. He has a rep for bringing in films on budget - and they make money. Jonathan Tropper's book was a best-seller. And the project was able to line up a killer cast. "Tina [Fey] was the first person I cast," Levy said earlier this month at the Toronto International Film Festival.
NEWS
March 13, 2014 | By John Timpane, Inquirer Staff Writer
Wednesday is the birthday of the World Wide Web. It's 25, a generation old. Together with the Internet, on which it works, it's the most ambiguous invention in human history. The Web/Internet is Shiva: god of creation, god of destruction. It has birthed a world once unimaginable. Robert Thompson, professor of television and popular culture at Syracuse University, says everyone has "the power to access and use others' information, and to produce our own, and send it around the world.
NEWS
December 26, 2013
An obituary in Tuesday's Inquirer listed the incorrect time for Shiva to be observed for Robert "Bob" Jawer. Shiva will be observed at his home from noon to 9 p.m. on Wednesday. Also, the first name of Mr. Jawer's wife, Helene, was omitted.
NEWS
December 8, 2013 | By Edith Newhall, For The Inquirer
Walking into Arcadia University Art Gallery, one can almost feel a magnetic pull from the 34 contemporary Shiva linga paintings that line the gallery's three inner walls. And no wonder: The lovely, peculiar little painting with the ovoid - some might say lozenge - shape at its center has the centuries-old distinction of being the supreme meditation tool, capable of capturing a viewer's attention so completely that all other thoughts are temporarily banished from the mind. (Later, the viewer will be able to visualize the image at will.)
NEWS
August 20, 2013 | By Sulaiman Abdur-Rahman, Inquirer Staff Writer
  Joseph Alberstadt, 86, a retired businessman who loved to travel the world, died Saturday, Aug. 17, at the Keystone House in Wyndmoor after a brief illness. His health had deteriorated after a recent fall. Mr. Alberstadt was an auctioneer and owner of Lionel Office Equipment, and he also volunteered for Learning Ally, an organization that makes reading accessible for the blind and dyslexic. Mr. Alberstadt's relatives say he was perhaps best known for his voracious appetite for traveling with his wife, Frances Klein Alberstadt, who died three years ago. "He and his late wife really knew how to have fun and a good time," said Harold Wolpert, one of Mr. Alberstadt's nephews.
NEWS
December 29, 2012
A funeral service will be held Sunday, Dec. 30, at 10 a.m. for Pauline Brotman, 91, who died Thursday morning at the Abramson Center in Horsham. The service will be at Goldstein's Funeral Home, 310 Second Street Pike, Southampton. Internment will follow at King David Cemetery and Shiva will take place at the home of her daughter, Randy Loukissas, 2940 Oakford Road, Ardmore. Mrs. Brotman was the matriarch of her family, and noted for her work ethic and strength. She worked as a bookkeeper for several area companies until the age of 88, said her grandson, Jeff Lubow, and she routinely shoveled snow into her 80s. Lubow recalled one time when she was in her 70s, after a blizzard, and was determined to shovel her entire driveway in Northeast Philadelphia, where she was living at the time, so she could get to work the next day. "It was so important to her," Lubow recalled.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 25, 2011 | By NEDRA PICKLER, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - A bitter assault case between members of the family behind the Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey circus ended yesterday with jurors deciding that neither side proved its case. The jury rejected Karen Feld's $110 million claim that her brother, circus CEO Kenneth Feld, ordered his security guards to assault her at a memorial service for their late aunt. They also rejected Kenneth Feld's counterclaim that his sister trespassed at the 2007 shivah by shouting anti-Semitic obscenities that disrupted the service.
NEWS
November 13, 2010 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Morton Krase was a Philadelphia Municipal Court judge and ardent Phillies fan. So after his funeral Sunday, Nov. 14, his family expects to sit shiva, not at home, as do many Jewish families. The Krase family was planning to be at the Hall of Fame Club at Citizens Bank Park in South Philadelphia, sitting shiva from 2 to 6 p.m. "He loved baseball," his daughter-in-law Christie Krase said. A season-ticket holder, he went to the ballpark for about 30 games each year. Judge Krase, 76, of Center City, died Thursday, Nov. 11, at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital of complications from multiple myeloma.
NEWS
March 14, 2004 | By Chris Satullo
Here's my problem with America's now-raging debate on the economy: Not enough Hinduism. I'm a churchgoer myself. But I have to concede this: Christianity, in its simplistic (i.e., political) form, is prone to binary thinking: good/evil, white hat/black hat. Applied to the economy, this habit leads many folks to cling to specious couplets: corporations bad/unions good; tax cuts good/social spending bad. Think, by contrast, of Hindu philosophy. One of the chief Hindu gods is a fellow named Shiva.
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