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Shooter

SPORTS
February 7, 1997 | by Dick Jerardi, Daily News Sports Writer
Terrell Myers has played 104 games for St. Joseph's. He has started just 10. No matter. The senior, whom some of the Hawks' most avid fans call the "Arc Angel," is a stone scorer. Myers warms up. The game starts. He sits on the bench, waits five minutes or so until Hawks coach Phil Martelli says it's time. It doesn't happen every night for Myers. But when he feels it, there's no more dangerous shooter in the Atlantic 10. Myers felt it early in the second half last night in a 71-53 win over Fordham at Alumni Memorial Fieldhouse.
SPORTS
October 7, 1988 | By Phil Jasner, Daily News Sports Writer
He was, at his best, The Boston Strangler. Android. Andrewwww. But through the last three NBA seasons, stained with controversy, splotched with injuries, Andrew Toney had become an innocuous shadow of himself. He had recurring pain in his feet, he was unable to play regularly or for extended periods of time. He was, in a sense, wasting away. "I played for the Celtics when he was called The Boston Strangler and Android," 76ers guard Gerald Henderson was saying last night as the news broke that Toney was on the verge of retiring.
NEWS
September 14, 2012 | BY PHILLIP LUCAS & MORGAN ZALOT, Daily News Staff Writers
OFFICER BRAD FOX, a seven-year veteran of the Plymouth Township police department and a former Marine who served two tours of duty in Iraq, was fatally shot in the line of duty Thursday just a day before his 35th birthday, Montgomery County authorities said. The alleged shooter was caught and killed, authorities said. "There are just no words that can begin to express the magnitude of this tragedy for Officer Fox's family, for his wife, for his beautiful little girl," said Risa Vetri Ferman, Montgomery County District Attorney.
SPORTS
March 23, 1993 | By Joe Juliano, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Take a look at Billy McCaffrey when he shoots. With his shoulders square, eyes focused, legs in perfect position and picturesque follow-through, the result usually is the beautiful music of ball swishing through net. McCaffrey, Vanderbilt's star guard, was born to shoot. The season's statistics don't lie: 55.6 percent from the field, 51.6 percent from three- point range, 87 percent from the free-throw line and a team-high average of 20.7 points per game. Yes, McCaffrey can shoot, but Vanderbilt coach Eddie Fogler prefers to look at it another way. "I wouldn't classify Billy a shooter as much as I would classify him as a scorer," Fogler said yesterday.
NEWS
September 15, 2013 | By Suzette Parmley, Inquirer Staff Writer
CAMDEN Camden County police have reached out to several dozen community and civic leaders in the hope of gathering information that will lead to the arrest of the shooter who fired into a busload of preschool children in Camden's Centerville section Thursday. Police had no suspect by late Friday afternoon. "We're reaching out to well over 100 church and civic leaders - anybody who is a community leader who we can get the word out to," Michael Daniels, public information officer for the Camden County Police Department, said Friday.
NEWS
February 8, 1993 | By Gene Morris, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Missy Light's career as a three-point shooter officially began at last season's Ardmore Rotary Tournament. Merion Mercy trailed Lower Merion by three points late in the championship game. Coach Joe D'Antonio brought Light off the bench and said, "OK, you shoot it. " Light, who had rarely shot a three-pointer in a game, nailed one at the buzzer to tie the score. Merion Mercy lost in overtime, but a long-range shooter was born. "It was great knowing I could do that," said the junior, who was 4 for 4 on three-pointers in Friday's 68-31 nonleague win over Germantown Academy.
NEWS
September 12, 2010 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
If Yvonne Hiller killed her coworkers at the Kraft Foods baking plant in Northeast Philadelphia last week as charged, she would join a rare - but possibly emerging - breed: women as workplace killers. Women commit fewer than 5 percent of homicides and assaults in the workplace, said Larry Barton, a teacher at the FBI Academy and author of four books on crisis management and violence at work. And, as a rule, they're much less likely to kill in general than men. They tend to internalize their anger or use words rather than haul out a gun in a public place and open fire, experts say. But in the last year, several high-profile cases of women killing in the workplace have occurred, including a professor accused of killing three colleagues and wounding three others in a February rampage after being denied tenure at the University of Alabama in Huntsville.
NEWS
April 8, 2000 | by Dave Racher, Daily News Staff Writer
The cops say New Year's morning came in with a bang. Some people thought firing gunshots into the air was a fun way to celebrate and get attention. The shooters didn't think that the attention would come from cops. They were wrong. Cops were stationed everywhere. William Meekens, 21, of 55th Street near Greenway Avenue, can attest to that. Two cops saw him firing shots from his front steps at about 12:15 a.m. A couple of bullets landed on a police car. Meekens was chased inside and arrested.
SPORTS
January 10, 2004 | By Marc Narducci INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Lauren Schurr doesn't want to be known as just a shooter, but it is very difficult to ignore that aspect of her game. A 5-foot-10 senior at Cherokee, Schurr arguably has one of the sweetest shots in South Jersey. Few in South Jersey are better than Schurr at dialing from long distance. Last year, she set a single-season school record with 84 three-point field goals. This season in a 52-39 win over Eastern, Schurr was at her best, scoring 18 points while hitting 7 of 10 from the field, including four three-pointers.
SPORTS
January 7, 2011 | By TED SILARY, silaryt@phillynews.com
WITH THE scoreboard clock showing fewer than 30 seconds, every player on both teams could be found at the benches. Except Billy Shank. Hey, he's a shooter, and so was his father, Bill, and opportunities to launch will never be wasted. Left-wing trey. Good. Straight-on trey. Missed. As one of Ss. Neumann-Goretti High's managers grabbed the rebound, Shank begged for the ball and begged some more. It's up. Good. "You can't leave the court with a miss. Never," Shank said, smiling.
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