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NEWS
November 29, 1986 | The Philadelphia Inquirer / VICKI VALERIO
In a post-Thanksgiving ritual, throngs of people crowded stores yesterday in the first binge of holiday shopping. At Strawbridge & Clothier's Center City store, Danielle Tippy, 3, of the Northeast, came eye to eye with a display-case doll, above. Santa Claus was handing out reindeer hats at the Gallery; Linda Mrak's niece refused to wear hers, so the Northeast woman donned it herself, at right. But it was Santa himself who held children fascinated, parents in lines and, in his red-suited arms, Jesse Miller, 4, below.
NEWS
November 6, 1996 | by Anthony S. Twyman and Marianne Costantinou, Daily News Staff Writers
Salt. Pepper. Grass. Green. University City. Shopping. Shopping? Given the West Philadelphia neighborhood's rash of highly publicized crime in recent months - capped by the Halloween stabbing death of Vladimir Sled, a University of Pennsylvania research scientist - shopping may not be the first thing folks think of when they think about University City. But the neighborhood surrounding the Penn campus is full of shops and restaurants. With the holidays coming, Penn and area merchants have announced "Steppin' Out Nites.
NEWS
August 18, 1987 | By MARIANNE COSTANTINOU, Daily News Nightlife Writer
Enter the glass doors and the shopping hormones start bubbling, the heart beat quickens, the thoughts practically scream through slacken jaws and drooling mouths. I want. I want. I want everything I ever wanted. And then some. Welcome to the King of Prussia shopping mall, where just about everything that can be bought in life is sold. All the big name stores are here. Macy's. Bloomies. Wanamaker's. Ann Taylor. Stern's. Brooks Brothers. Conran's. J.C. Penney.
NEWS
June 24, 2011
Even though the shop-'til-you-drop lifestyle is rampant in a consumer society, few people would regard shopping for an electricity supplier as their idea of retail therapy. But lately, the state's top utility regulator has been talking about forcing every Pennsylvania electricity customer to do just that: pick from among a possibly bewildering number of power suppliers. Concerned that only about one in five customers in the Philadelphia region has broken away from the Peco Energy Co. mother ship as his or her power supplier, state Public Utility Commission Chairman Robert F. Powelson has suggested the state revamp the rules to make shopping mandatory.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 14, 1990 | By Maria Gallagher, Daily News Restaurant Critic
There are few things the Guerrilla Gourmet likes better than dining, and one of them is shopping. So when the new Shops at Liberty Place opened, with its heady array of retail and a food court called the Buffet to boot, the lure was irresistible. Choosing among the 14 stands was not easy. The vendors include Bain's Deli, Bassett's Original Turkey, Chick-fil-A, Everything Yogurt and Sbarro, plus purveyors of sushi, Mexican, gyros, Chinese and cheesesteaks. The best thing to do is wander and pick what looks freshest, which can vary depending on the time of day. Late one weekday afternoon - 4:10 p.m. to be exact - the pizza at Montesini Pizza and Ristorante still looked inviting, even though lunchtime was long past.
NEWS
August 12, 2005 | By Nancy Viau
The TV weather map shows smiling raindrops and a cheery sun peeking out from behind thunderbolts, but that's not what's outside my door. Here at the Shore, it's cloudy and cool; the sun is on vacation. No one is eager to get to the beach, and because the food level in my house drops as fast as the barometric pressure, I use the morning hours to get groceries. Two hundred dollars later, the pantry is stocked, and the lousy weather shows no signs of disappearing. We eat lunch and snack our way through a puzzle, two games of Pictionary, and a 007 movie.
NEWS
December 10, 1992 | By Kathleen Martin Beans, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
It was an exclusive shopping party of sorts at area Clover stores on Sunday evening. Only senior citizens and people with disabilities were invited. In the Feasterville store, Girl Scouts caroled through the aisles, and singer Dean Garofolo, 27, belted out Christmas tunes over a microphone at the store entrance. Shoppers picked up free cookies, brownies and coffee along with the bargains they put in their carts. The 25 area Clover stores offered a storewide discount of 10 percent to its senior and disabled shoppers and gave them a coupon book with deeper discounts on such items as clothes, watches, jewelry and perfume.
SPORTS
August 6, 1997 | by Marcus Hayes, Daily News Sports Writer
The shopping season is over. In the NFL, the days from Feb. 15, when free agency begins, to the first couple of weeks of training camp, in essence, constitute the shopping season. It is a time when teams seek the best talent to serve their needs. This shopping season, the Eagles wanted to upgrade their defensive line, offensive line, special teams, wide receiving corps, defensive backfield and, if possible, linebacker position. Fortified with the best salary-cap situation in the league, they went shopping.
NEWS
July 20, 2000 | by Alex Richmond, For the Daily News Daily News wire services contributed to this report
Jenny Martin, owner of Jenny's Vintage in the South Street Antiques Market, offers her RTF shopping list (supplemented with a few trends we spotted from the fall shows earlier this year). Start looking now - stores are stocking for fall. Below-the-knee- or at-the-knee-length skirts. "But not too long," says Martin. A-lines are great, too. A little ruffle, or a lace applique on cardigans or tops. Slits or vents in skirts. "Not too high, or you get trashy," Martin warns.
FOOD
February 28, 1988 | The Inquirer Staff
A quarter of a century after Betty Friedan ignited the feminist movement with The Feminine Mystique, women are still doing almost all the cooking and grocery shopping, according to an extensive survey conducted by the New York Times. Responses from 1,870 people, interviewed by telephone, showed that even though more women are in the work force, have less time at home and have been campaigning to get their husbands to share household chores, they are still the ones who pay attention to how, when, what and where their families eat. Among married couples questioned, only 18 percent of the men said they did the main food shopping for the family.
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BUSINESS
May 19, 2015 | By Suzette Parmley, Inquirer Staff Writer
ATLANTIC CITY - Bass Pro Shops opened here April 15, and the outdoor gear and apparel retailer surpassed expected sales by "40 percent" for its first month. "It was outstanding," said Eric Clements, the store's general manager, whose Springfield, Mo., firm doesn't release specific sales numbers. The Bass store sales represent a hopeful blip in this ailing gambling town, where four casinos closed last year, snuffing out 8,000 jobs. Retail is expected to play a bigger role here.
BUSINESS
May 18, 2015 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
Four years into Pennsylvania's much-heralded Era of Electric Choice, it's time to assess. Is it worth switching electricity suppliers? Maybe. Picking plans and suppliers is a gamble, as many discovered, to their dismay, during last year's chilling polar vortex. Since then, the state Public Utility Commission has toughened the rules, to make it harder for shady operators. But never underestimate the creativity of dishonest people. If you follow a few simple rules and filter out most of the noise, I've discovered, there are ways to achieve tortoise-like savings, without much sweat.
SPORTS
May 8, 2015 | BY MIKE KERN, Daily News Staff Writer kernm@phillynews.com
GALLOWAY, N.J. - Stacy Lewis, the reigning LPGA Tour Player of the Year, has played in eight events this season. She hasn't finished worse than 15th. She's been second three times, including a playoff loss in the first women's major of the season, last month's ANA Inspiration, the former Kraft Nabisco. She's fourth on the money list, and ranked third in the world, after making it to No. 1 in both of the two previous years. Yet she's gone 11 months since winning the last of her 11 professional titles, which includes two majors.
NEWS
May 5, 2015
M ATT FINEBERG, 36, of Upper Darby, is founder and CEO of Bestimators, a Web-based firm that helps homeowners find home-improvement contractors. The startup is working out of a space at Ventureforth, on 8th Street near Willow, in North Philadelphia. Q: How'd you come up with the idea? A: I spent 10 years in sales and consulting for the home-improvement industry and saw homeowners and contractors frustrated by the process. The idea was to have a single marketplace where people could shop for home-improvement projects the same way they do airline tickets and hotel reservations.
NEWS
April 25, 2015 | By Tricia L. Nadolny, Inquirer Staff Writer
City Council has tried to ban them and tax them, but plastic bags have continued to flutter out of Philadelphia's reach. Now one member of Council is targeting them anew - with a bill to impose a five-cent fee on all shopping bags, paper and plastic. "People go into convenience stores and come out with a bag that they really didn't need and toss it onto the streets," said Councilman Mark Squilla, who introduced the bill Thursday. About a dozen states and scores of municipalities - including Washington, Chicago, and San Francisco - have passed laws to regulate plastic bags.
NEWS
April 24, 2015 | BY MENSAH M. DEAN, Daily News Staff Writer deanm@phillynews.com, 215-854-4172
HOW MUCH WOULD you pay for the plastic and paper bags used by grocery stores and other retailers? A penny? Maybe for your thoughts, but City Councilman Mark Squilla thinks you should pay five cents for each bag. A bill he introduced yesterday calls for the tax as a way to discourage littering while helping to fund the city's anti-littering campaign. Two cents from each nickel collected would go to the city and could generate as much as $150,000 a month, said Squilla, a Democrat who represents the 1st District, which includes parts of South Philadelphia, Center City and Port Richmond.
NEWS
April 17, 2015 | By Suzette Parmley, Inquirer Staff Writer
ATLANTIC CITY - Gov. Christie ran a bit late from his Wednesday appearance in New Hampshire to cut the new store's ribbon, but that didn't discourage the massive crowd that wanted to be among the first to enter the new Bass Pro Shops Outpost, the latest element in this city's revitalization efforts. As Christie finally hit the stage 20 minutes late, at 6:20 p.m., he endured loud boos from Eagles fans because of his affinity for the Dallas Cowboys. To appease them, he called former Eagles running back Brian Westbrook - standing behind him onstage, along with Miss New Jersey 2014, the current Miss America, and NASCAR driver Tony Stewart - to come forward.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 18, 2015
BEING A MAN of average height, I've always envied the advantages that come with being tall. Tall people are the first to get noticed, and thus get first pick of the hottest babes. Tall people are assumed to be worthy of leadership. That's why they're always in line for promotions. Best picks from the apple tree? Tall people. Top-shelf liquor? Tall people. Most likely to get the last American Girl doll at the Black Friday riot? You guessed it. Tall people. I've always wanted my children to have the best in life, so, in addition to working hard to provide them with food, shelter and creature comforts, I've always hoped they'd get the tall gene from my dad's side of the family.
BUSINESS
March 16, 2015 | By Jacob Adelman, For The Inquirer
Eric Martin, 28, has tried his hand at day trading, running for Congress, and designing kids' games. None of those efforts came to much. But his latest scheme could soon make him an Internet multimillionaire. The fresh-faced father of two won a competition to recruit the most new users for the soon-to-be-launched shopping site Jet.com, the brainchild of a Web entrepreneur whose last business was bought by Amazon for about $545 million. Martin was awarded stock options that could be worth $18 million if the company is successful, an outcome that some of the world's biggest investors are banking on. "I still have my full-time job. This was more like a moonshot," Martin said recently in his small York, Pa., home.
NEWS
March 16, 2015 | BY LARA WITT, Daily News Staff Writer wittl@phillynews.com, 215-854-5927
TAMMY Sadler-Chase was sick and uninsured. She had lost her mobility and her sight after being diagnosed with a rare blood disorder. Her hospital bills had reached nearly $200,000. And every time she applied for insurance, she was denied. Desperate for help, Sadler-Chase called the PHMC Rising Sun Health Center in Olney, where she was connected to a lawyer named Lydia Gottesfeld, who helped her secure proper care and health-care coverage. Sadler-Chase is one of more than 400 patients who are utilizing Rising Sun Health Center, which this month officially began offering on-site financial and legal services to its clients, making it the first of its kind in the nation.
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