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NEWS
November 29, 1986 | The Philadelphia Inquirer / VICKI VALERIO
In a post-Thanksgiving ritual, throngs of people crowded stores yesterday in the first binge of holiday shopping. At Strawbridge & Clothier's Center City store, Danielle Tippy, 3, of the Northeast, came eye to eye with a display-case doll, above. Santa Claus was handing out reindeer hats at the Gallery; Linda Mrak's niece refused to wear hers, so the Northeast woman donned it herself, at right. But it was Santa himself who held children fascinated, parents in lines and, in his red-suited arms, Jesse Miller, 4, below.
NEWS
November 6, 1996 | by Anthony S. Twyman and Marianne Costantinou, Daily News Staff Writers
Salt. Pepper. Grass. Green. University City. Shopping. Shopping? Given the West Philadelphia neighborhood's rash of highly publicized crime in recent months - capped by the Halloween stabbing death of Vladimir Sled, a University of Pennsylvania research scientist - shopping may not be the first thing folks think of when they think about University City. But the neighborhood surrounding the Penn campus is full of shops and restaurants. With the holidays coming, Penn and area merchants have announced "Steppin' Out Nites.
NEWS
August 18, 1987 | By MARIANNE COSTANTINOU, Daily News Nightlife Writer
Enter the glass doors and the shopping hormones start bubbling, the heart beat quickens, the thoughts practically scream through slacken jaws and drooling mouths. I want. I want. I want everything I ever wanted. And then some. Welcome to the King of Prussia shopping mall, where just about everything that can be bought in life is sold. All the big name stores are here. Macy's. Bloomies. Wanamaker's. Ann Taylor. Stern's. Brooks Brothers. Conran's. J.C. Penney.
NEWS
June 24, 2011
Even though the shop-'til-you-drop lifestyle is rampant in a consumer society, few people would regard shopping for an electricity supplier as their idea of retail therapy. But lately, the state's top utility regulator has been talking about forcing every Pennsylvania electricity customer to do just that: pick from among a possibly bewildering number of power suppliers. Concerned that only about one in five customers in the Philadelphia region has broken away from the Peco Energy Co. mother ship as his or her power supplier, state Public Utility Commission Chairman Robert F. Powelson has suggested the state revamp the rules to make shopping mandatory.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 14, 1990 | By Maria Gallagher, Daily News Restaurant Critic
There are few things the Guerrilla Gourmet likes better than dining, and one of them is shopping. So when the new Shops at Liberty Place opened, with its heady array of retail and a food court called the Buffet to boot, the lure was irresistible. Choosing among the 14 stands was not easy. The vendors include Bain's Deli, Bassett's Original Turkey, Chick-fil-A, Everything Yogurt and Sbarro, plus purveyors of sushi, Mexican, gyros, Chinese and cheesesteaks. The best thing to do is wander and pick what looks freshest, which can vary depending on the time of day. Late one weekday afternoon - 4:10 p.m. to be exact - the pizza at Montesini Pizza and Ristorante still looked inviting, even though lunchtime was long past.
NEWS
August 12, 2005 | By Nancy Viau
The TV weather map shows smiling raindrops and a cheery sun peeking out from behind thunderbolts, but that's not what's outside my door. Here at the Shore, it's cloudy and cool; the sun is on vacation. No one is eager to get to the beach, and because the food level in my house drops as fast as the barometric pressure, I use the morning hours to get groceries. Two hundred dollars later, the pantry is stocked, and the lousy weather shows no signs of disappearing. We eat lunch and snack our way through a puzzle, two games of Pictionary, and a 007 movie.
NEWS
December 10, 1992 | By Kathleen Martin Beans, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
It was an exclusive shopping party of sorts at area Clover stores on Sunday evening. Only senior citizens and people with disabilities were invited. In the Feasterville store, Girl Scouts caroled through the aisles, and singer Dean Garofolo, 27, belted out Christmas tunes over a microphone at the store entrance. Shoppers picked up free cookies, brownies and coffee along with the bargains they put in their carts. The 25 area Clover stores offered a storewide discount of 10 percent to its senior and disabled shoppers and gave them a coupon book with deeper discounts on such items as clothes, watches, jewelry and perfume.
SPORTS
August 6, 1997 | by Marcus Hayes, Daily News Sports Writer
The shopping season is over. In the NFL, the days from Feb. 15, when free agency begins, to the first couple of weeks of training camp, in essence, constitute the shopping season. It is a time when teams seek the best talent to serve their needs. This shopping season, the Eagles wanted to upgrade their defensive line, offensive line, special teams, wide receiving corps, defensive backfield and, if possible, linebacker position. Fortified with the best salary-cap situation in the league, they went shopping.
NEWS
July 20, 2000 | by Alex Richmond, For the Daily News Daily News wire services contributed to this report
Jenny Martin, owner of Jenny's Vintage in the South Street Antiques Market, offers her RTF shopping list (supplemented with a few trends we spotted from the fall shows earlier this year). Start looking now - stores are stocking for fall. Below-the-knee- or at-the-knee-length skirts. "But not too long," says Martin. A-lines are great, too. A little ruffle, or a lace applique on cardigans or tops. Slits or vents in skirts. "Not too high, or you get trashy," Martin warns.
FOOD
February 28, 1988 | The Inquirer Staff
A quarter of a century after Betty Friedan ignited the feminist movement with The Feminine Mystique, women are still doing almost all the cooking and grocery shopping, according to an extensive survey conducted by the New York Times. Responses from 1,870 people, interviewed by telephone, showed that even though more women are in the work force, have less time at home and have been campaigning to get their husbands to share household chores, they are still the ones who pay attention to how, when, what and where their families eat. Among married couples questioned, only 18 percent of the men said they did the main food shopping for the family.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
November 9, 2014 | By Robert Calandra, For The Inquirer
When the Affordable Care Act marketplace reopens on November 15, Lenora Fedick will "more than likely" reenroll in her current Independence Blue Cross plan. But before she commits, the Phoenixville resident wants to know that she's getting every penny's worth for the premium she's paying. So Fedick is going to do a little shopping. "I want to make sure that I'm getting the best deal," said Fedick, who was among the roughly 50 residents who attended Independence's "Renewal" seminar at the Phoenixville YMCA last week.
NEWS
November 8, 2014 | By Jason Laughlin, Inquirer Staff Writer
A proposed development on Lancaster Avenue, a key corridor on the Main Line, would bring new restaurants, shopping, and offices to an undeveloped tract in Bryn Mawr. The $20 million development still requires final approval from the Lower Merion commissioners. It could open in spring 2016 and would incorporate a vacant 1920s-era garage at 909 Lancaster Ave., between North Merion Avenue and North Warner Avenue. A strip of vacant shops behind the garage would be torn down. "Bryn Mawr has a history," said Paul Aschkenasy, the property owner and developer.
NEWS
November 7, 2014
WE, THE anti-consumerists, are losing the battles to curtail the consumerism that drives America, especially during the holiday season. Again this year, major retailers are leaping over each other in an effort to be the first to open early on Thanksgiving Day - before you even have a chance to cut the apple pie. This trend has been building since 2011. Black Friday, the day after Thanksgiving, is no longer the traditional kickoff of the holiday shopping season. We now have Black Thursday.
NEWS
November 6, 2014 | By Elizabeth Wellington, Inquirer Fashion Writer
Perusing department store racks is my downtime thing. Hauling armloads of jeans into dressing rooms is thrilling. One day I hope to walk into a boutique and embrace the trimmed-in-leather herringbone sheath I've been searching three years for. That is why the thought of searching for, and buying, clothing from a cold, hard laptop or smartphone app is weird to me. But I could no longer ignore the lure of the curated click. In the last few years, cyber-fashion shopping has evolved well beyond Gilt Groupe's online sample sales and Net-a-Porter's best buys in luxury.
NEWS
October 31, 2014 | By Elizabeth Wellington, Inquirer Fashion Writer
Jewelry lovers might want to make time this weekend to visit the University of Pennsylvania's Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology. As part of the 127-year-old museum's fund-raising efforts, it's hosting "Treasures," a four-day baublefest starting Thursday that features a private reception, talks with jewelry historians, and fall fashion advice from local stylists. In addition, 26 jewelry designers will be selling handmade, one-of-a-kind accessories to shoppers with a sweet spot for frippery.
NEWS
October 29, 2014 | BY JULIE SHAW, Daily News Staff Writer shawj@phillynews.com, 215-854-2592
THE CO-OWNER of a Frankford auto-body shop who pleaded guilty to bribing a police dispatcher for information in the tow-truck business was sentenced yesterday to three years of probation. William Cheeseman, 43, of Delran, N.J., was ordered by U.S. District Judge Eduardo Robreno to spend the first six months under electronically monitored home confinement. The judge said Cheeseman may leave his home to go to work, for medical appointments or for religious reasons. Robreno also barred Cheeseman from the towing business in Philadelphia during his probation, but did not prohibit him from doing other work.
NEWS
October 19, 2014 | By Vernon Clark and Marcus Biddle, Inquirer Staff Writers
For Stephanie and Gerald Wright of Philadelphia's Germantown section, the ideal high school for daughter Nyla would be a public school with rigorous programs in science, math, and the arts. "I'm looking for a high school that's going to be geared toward 21st-century learning," Stephanie Wright said. Wright was among more than 1,000 students, parents, and counselors attending the Philly High School Fair on Friday afternoon. The free two-day event at the Armory at Drexel University features representatives from more than 100 public, charter, private, and archdiocesan high schools from around the region, offering information to prospective students.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 16, 2014 | By Elizabeth Wellington, Inquirer Fashion Writer
When Philadelphia's Century 21 department store opens Oct. 23 at Eighth and Market Streets, walls of discounted designer perfumes from Burberry to Marc Jacobs will greet shoppers, just like in its New York flagship. Behind the scents will be the affordable handbags, where a swirly-print Kate Spade tote beckons. On the ground floor, tucked between Enzo Angiolini pumps and Isaac Mizrahi kitten heels, there will be a glorious pair of gold patent leather Mary Jane wedges by Céline.
NEWS
October 14, 2014 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia developer Bart Blatstein said Sunday he and casino architect Paul Steelman had agreed to buy the four-story, 300,000-square-foot, half-empty Caesars Pier shopping center in Atlantic City for a small fraction of its construction cost. A person familiar with the deal said Blatstein and Steelman agreed to pay $2.8 million. That's less than 2 percent of the $200 million-plus that developer Taubman Centers of the Detroit suburbs and other investors plowed into the project in the mid-00s.
NEWS
September 21, 2014 | By Al Haas, For The Inquirer
So, your son or daughter now has a driver's license, and you would like to get him or her something to drive. You want a ride your offspring would like, but you also want it to be safe and affordable. My suggestion is to think three-year-old small car. Buying a three-year-old vehicle means you are avoiding the worst depreciation, yet getting a relatively low-mileage car of recent design. Purchasing a small car means minimal bucks up front and at the gas pump. And thanks to stronger, more advanced architecture and more safety amenities, buying a small car is a much safer proposition than it once was. (The Chevrolet Cruze, for example, has 10 air bags.)
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