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Shopping

NEWS
July 20, 2000 | by Alex Richmond, For the Daily News Daily News wire services contributed to this report
Jenny Martin, owner of Jenny's Vintage in the South Street Antiques Market, offers her RTF shopping list (supplemented with a few trends we spotted from the fall shows earlier this year). Start looking now - stores are stocking for fall. Below-the-knee- or at-the-knee-length skirts. "But not too long," says Martin. A-lines are great, too. A little ruffle, or a lace applique on cardigans or tops. Slits or vents in skirts. "Not too high, or you get trashy," Martin warns.
FOOD
February 28, 1988 | The Inquirer Staff
A quarter of a century after Betty Friedan ignited the feminist movement with The Feminine Mystique, women are still doing almost all the cooking and grocery shopping, according to an extensive survey conducted by the New York Times. Responses from 1,870 people, interviewed by telephone, showed that even though more women are in the work force, have less time at home and have been campaigning to get their husbands to share household chores, they are still the ones who pay attention to how, when, what and where their families eat. Among married couples questioned, only 18 percent of the men said they did the main food shopping for the family.
NEWS
June 30, 2006
IT'S LESS than six months until Christmas, so I've already started to shop. For Speaker John Perzel: A child's tattoo kit so he can practice on his Harrisburg cronies. The kit contains a tattoo of a pig. Rick Mariano and Corey Kemp: An old- style Monopoly game to spend their years in jail. Yo, Rick and Corey, those "Get out of jail free" cards are only game pieces. Rick Santorum: Hillary Clinton described him as the Forrest Gump of the Senate, so he gets a copy of the movie.
NEWS
December 5, 2001
Waiting for inventor Dean Kamen's Segway personal transport machine to go on sale? In the interim, Center City has introduced the next best thing - a new bus called Spree. No ordinary bus, Spree is colored teal blue and covered with pictures of shoes, lobsters, neckties and other things Center City visitors might be tempted to buy. The Spree bus arrives every 10 minutes between 10:30 a.m. and 5:30 p.m. at 30 stops along a clearly marked route between 20th and Market Streets and Sixth and Walnut - a loop that takes in the new Independence Visitor Center, Lord & Taylor, the Gallery, Rittenhouse Row and other key shopper and tourist sites.
LIVING
December 7, 1986 | By Gary Haynes, Inquirer Graphic Arts Director
There is a point of no return in the holiday shopping season when there are more people left on the gift list than there are shopping days to find the appropriate present. To make shopping for the photographer on the list a bit simpler, here are some practical and not-so-practical suggestions from Sarah Leen, J. Kyle Keener, Kendall Wilkinson, Tom Gralish, Greg Lanier, John Costello and Frank Glackin of The Inquirer photo staff: A TRIPOD. Either a desktop or full size, a tripod is a valuable tool no photographer should be without.
BUSINESS
September 17, 1992 | by Francesca Chapman, Daily News Staff Writer Daily News staff writer Edward Moran also contributed to this story
At 7:30 last night, Banana Republic store manager Michael Jaslow stuck his head out the door of his shop and blinked in disbelief at the throngs of people milling about at 18th and Walnut streets. "Oh, my God!" he shouted to a co-worker inside. "Look at all these people out here! It's a zoo! And . . . they're shopping!" They were indeed shopping, at least in parts of the city last night, as the Center City District kicked off its first Wednesday of late-night shopping. The much-publicized event turned the area's sidewalks into a carnival, as many shops stayed open until 8 p.m., bands played on street corners, costumed actors handed out coupons and guidebooks, television news vans crowded the sidewalks and salespeople hovered in their doorways.
NEWS
March 9, 1986 | By Janet Ruth Falon, Special to The Inquirer
The Washington neighborhood of Georgetown is shopping-as-sport incarnate; if it had a theme song, surely it would be either Madonna's "Material Girl" Cyndi Lauper's "Money Changes Everything. " Throw yourself into it with open arms - and an open wallet, too. You can spend your wampum here in a variety of fun ways, satisfying any streak of an acquisitive nature you might harbor (yes, even you, you '60s holdover). Georgetown - the core of which is roughly bounded by 28th Street, S Street, 37th Street at Georgetown University and the C & O Canal below K Street, all in the northwest quadrant of the city - is overrun with shoe stores and trendy clothes shops, as well as galleries, upscale kitchen paraphernalia shops, all sorts of bookstores and boutiques that sell those stylish little ephemeral doodads, called chachkas by some in the old country, that rarely serve much purpose than underscoring their owner's hip-in-the-know-ness.
BUSINESS
October 17, 1997 | By Jeff Gelles, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Customers who will be able to choose their electricity suppliers as part of a 14-month pilot program for electricity competition in Pennsylvania have been given extra time to shop. That was the word yesterday from the state Public Utility Commission, which decided to give pilot participants, including about 78,000 customers in the Peco Energy service territory, until Nov. 14 to make a choice. The deadline had been Oct. 25. Participants who do not choose a supplier by the deadline risk losing their spots in the pilot program to other applicants.
NEWS
September 4, 1988 | By Erin Kennedy, Special to The Inquirer
Justin Harlem, 8 1/2, of Huntingdon Valley, looked sullen as his mother pulled on the waistband of a brand new pair of gray cotton pants. He wasn't happy about having to spend his Saturday in the Willow Grove Park mall shopping for school clothes. "I hate it," he said. "I'd rather be swimming at my neighbor's house. " His mother, Davida Harlem, was having just as much fun trying to get Justin and his brother Seth, 7, to try on clothes in Sears. "As long as it's comfortable - and quick - he doesn't care what it is," she said.
NEWS
July 1, 1993 | For The Inquirer / PAOLA TAGLIAMONTE
It was a three-day festival of food, magicians, jugglers and musical entertainment at the 29th annual Media Town Fair and Sidewalk Sale. In addition to shopping for bargains at the sidewalk sale, the fair, which began last Thursday, featured a five-mile run on Friday and a 1950s-style cruise car show on Saturday.
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