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NEWS
October 31, 2014 | By Elizabeth Wellington, Inquirer Fashion Writer
Jewelry lovers might want to make time this weekend to visit the University of Pennsylvania's Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology. As part of the 127-year-old museum's fund-raising efforts, it's hosting "Treasures," a four-day baublefest starting Thursday that features a private reception, talks with jewelry historians, and fall fashion advice from local stylists. In addition, 26 jewelry designers will be selling handmade, one-of-a-kind accessories to shoppers with a sweet spot for frippery.
NEWS
October 29, 2014 | BY JULIE SHAW, Daily News Staff Writer shawj@phillynews.com, 215-854-2592
THE CO-OWNER of a Frankford auto-body shop who pleaded guilty to bribing a police dispatcher for information in the tow-truck business was sentenced yesterday to three years of probation. William Cheeseman, 43, of Delran, N.J., was ordered by U.S. District Judge Eduardo Robreno to spend the first six months under electronically monitored home confinement. The judge said Cheeseman may leave his home to go to work, for medical appointments or for religious reasons. Robreno also barred Cheeseman from the towing business in Philadelphia during his probation, but did not prohibit him from doing other work.
NEWS
October 19, 2014 | By Vernon Clark and Marcus Biddle, Inquirer Staff Writers
For Stephanie and Gerald Wright of Philadelphia's Germantown section, the ideal high school for daughter Nyla would be a public school with rigorous programs in science, math, and the arts. "I'm looking for a high school that's going to be geared toward 21st-century learning," Stephanie Wright said. Wright was among more than 1,000 students, parents, and counselors attending the Philly High School Fair on Friday afternoon. The free two-day event at the Armory at Drexel University features representatives from more than 100 public, charter, private, and archdiocesan high schools from around the region, offering information to prospective students.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 16, 2014 | By Elizabeth Wellington, Inquirer Fashion Writer
When Philadelphia's Century 21 department store opens Oct. 23 at Eighth and Market Streets, walls of discounted designer perfumes from Burberry to Marc Jacobs will greet shoppers, just like in its New York flagship. Behind the scents will be the affordable handbags, where a swirly-print Kate Spade tote beckons. On the ground floor, tucked between Enzo Angiolini pumps and Isaac Mizrahi kitten heels, there will be a glorious pair of gold patent leather Mary Jane wedges by Céline.
NEWS
October 14, 2014 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia developer Bart Blatstein said Sunday he and casino architect Paul Steelman had agreed to buy the four-story, 300,000-square-foot, half-empty Caesars Pier shopping center in Atlantic City for a small fraction of its construction cost. A person familiar with the deal said Blatstein and Steelman agreed to pay $2.8 million. That's less than 2 percent of the $200 million-plus that developer Taubman Centers of the Detroit suburbs and other investors plowed into the project in the mid-00s.
NEWS
September 21, 2014 | By Al Haas, For The Inquirer
So, your son or daughter now has a driver's license, and you would like to get him or her something to drive. You want a ride your offspring would like, but you also want it to be safe and affordable. My suggestion is to think three-year-old small car. Buying a three-year-old vehicle means you are avoiding the worst depreciation, yet getting a relatively low-mileage car of recent design. Purchasing a small car means minimal bucks up front and at the gas pump. And thanks to stronger, more advanced architecture and more safety amenities, buying a small car is a much safer proposition than it once was. (The Chevrolet Cruze, for example, has 10 air bags.)
NEWS
September 16, 2014 | By Angelo Fichera, Inquirer Staff Writer
For months, the peculiar saga of a downtown Swedesboro liquor shop owner scaring away customers - many of them shouted down with racial epithets in a manner reminiscent of a bygone era - has been the talk of the borough. Some were shooed from the store without the booze (or, in one case, the Coke) they had come to buy. Others were locked out. A handwritten note on the door warned patrons: "The clerk does not want to talk. " Complaints about store owner Mario "Mike" Falciani's outbursts led the mayor to call him a "known racist.
NEWS
September 13, 2014 | By Aubrey Whelan, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia police are investigating an incident of anti-Semitic vandalism in which swastikas were painted on the outside of a butcher store in Northeast Philadelphia. The owner of Simon's Kosher, on the 6900 block of Bustleton Avenue, discovered several swastikas painted on the outside of the store around 8:22 a.m. Thursday, police said. The symbols were painted in red on the storefront and on the rear of the building, police said. Detectives are investigating. Police said no similar incidents had been reported in the area recently.
NEWS
September 7, 2014 | By David O'Reilly, Inquirer Staff Writer
The once-thriving but long-vacant shopping plaza in Delran that once housed a Sam's Club wholesale discount store has been sold and expects to sign tenants soon, its new owner said. Sun Equity Partners, based in Lakewood, Ocean County, acquired the Route 130 property from Vornado Realty Trust last week, Sun's acquisitions director, Abe Tress, said Friday. "We're in talks with large retailers," said Tress, who declined to name them "because we haven't signed them. " His four-year-old firm specializes in distressed properties like the Delran site, he said, which has been largely unused for a decade.
NEWS
September 3, 2014 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
As a small public college that targets top high school students, the College of New Jersey prides itself on high retention and graduation rates and regular recognition as a top economic value for families. What the suburban campus outside Trenton hasn't been able to brag about: A particular sense of place. "One of the things that we've often heard from our students and graduates is there's no real here here," said Curt Heuring, vice president of administration. "There's nothing to do, so people have a tendency to go home on weekends, or go to Route 1, or go to the malls in Pennsylvania, that kind of thing.
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