CollectionsShoreline
IN THE NEWS

Shoreline

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
November 21, 1990 | By Ovetta Wiggins, Special to The Inquirer
It may not be much, but now it belongs to the City of Beverly, said Mayor Frank Costello of the riverfront property that was recently deeded to the city by the New Jersey-American Water Co. It didn't cost much either. For $1, the company earlier this month handed over the deed to the 700-foot strip of property between Laurel and Broad Streets. The land, from 50 to 70 feet wide, makes up most of the 900-foot shoreline property along the Delaware River that was reconstructed in the spring.
NEWS
August 17, 1998 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Michael Bruno has spent years tracking the Jersey Shore's ever-decreasing supply of beach sand and rallying support for renourishing its storm-ravaged strands. But for the first time, Bruno, an assistant professor of ocean engineering and the director of the Stevens Institute of Technology's Davidson Laboratory in Hoboken, and other researchers may be able to understand exactly how beaches are affected by tides, wind and waves during nor'easters and hurricanes. Though the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)
ENTERTAINMENT
April 19, 1992 | By Jonathan Storm, INQUIRER TELEVISION CRITIC
Two shows from different ends of the spectrum will turn up on TV tonight. New Jersey Network presents an informative little piece that demonstrates the value of local public television, and NBC introduces some depressing trash that symbolizes the failings of commercial TV. Jersey Shore birds may be a little disoriented this spring when they hit the beach: Some of it is no longer there. Storms that weren't much more than an annoying drizzle in Philadelphia on Halloween and in January did $100 million worth of damage down the Shore and once again raised the question about what would happen if a real deluge came up the coast.
NEWS
November 1, 2012 | By Geoff Mulvihill And Maryclaire Dale, ASSOCIATED PRESS
LONG BEACH TOWNSHIP, N.J. - In its tear of destruction, the megastorm Sandy left parts of New Jersey's beloved Shore in tatters, sweeping away beaches, homes, boardwalks and amusement parks. The devastation left the state a blank canvas to redevelop its prized vacation towns. But environmentalists and shoreline planners urged the state to think about how - and if - to redevelop the shoreline as it faces an even greater threat of extreme weather. "The next 50 to 100 years are going to be very different than what we've seen in the past 50 years," said S. Jeffress Williams, a scientist emeritus at the U.S. Geological Survey's Woods Hole Science Center in Massachusetts.
NEWS
July 9, 2012 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, Inquirer Staff Writer
LITTLE BEACH ISLAND, N.J. - Unlike other Jersey Shore barrier islands that have evolved into hometowns and tourist destinations, Little Beach Island is an enigma. "I've often sat and wondered about what kind of a place Little Beach Island would have become had it been developed," said Steven Howard, who has studied the ebb and flow of what is believed to be the last sizable uninhabited barrier island on the Atlantic coast, between Long Beach Island and Brigantine. "What would be its place among all the other [New Jersey]
NEWS
November 18, 1996 | By Patricia Smith, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
In the glory days of Laurel Lake, a Sunday midsummer afternoon was a sight to remember: Hundreds of canoes and rowboats would glide across the water from the boathouse while picnickers romped on the shore and young boys fished off the footbridge. And when Old Man Winter froze the lake into a crystal sheet, children would build mighty bonfires and have ice-skating parties. How times have changed. Laurel Lake, nestled between Lindenwold and Laurel Springs in Camden County, is a shadow of its former self: A six-foot-wide ribbon of muck, dead leaves and trash lines the edge of the lake.
NEWS
January 24, 2013 | By Wayne Parry, Associated Press
BELMAR, N.J. - As Jersey Shore towns spend millions of dollars to rebuild boardwalks wrecked by Sandy, some are opting for an additional layer of protection in the form of steel seawalls placed between the boards and the shoreline. The idea is to protect the boardwalks - and the homes and businesses nearby - from the destructive power of storm surges. "It has to be an engineered seawall-and-dune system that will protect the boardwalk and mitigate against the storm surge going into the neighborhood," Belmar Mayor Matthew Doherty said.
NEWS
November 9, 1997 | By Nancy Petersen, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The day after last week's election, Chester County Commissioner Karen Martynick headed to Chambers Lake in Hibernia County Park for a little rest and relaxation. She took in the view - the lake and the trees along the shoreline with their fall colors shimmering in the late afternoon sun - and thought about a fence. "I don't understand," she said. "I sat there and tried to envision it. I am at a loss for words. " The county's Parks and Recreation Department wants to erect a six-foot, chain-link fence that would run 1,525 feet between Wagontown Road and the lake's shoreline.
NEWS
May 5, 2010 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
There are tugboats, barges, skimmer boats, and many miles of brightly colored booms being deployed in the desperate effort to curtail the spread of oil in the Gulf of Mexico. But perhaps the most sophisticated tools are doing their work far out of sight, 5,000 feet beneath the water's surface. These 10 unmanned devices are called remotely operated vehicles - ROVs. Some are nearly as big as minivans, and they are the high-tech workhorses of the deep sea. While the gushing oil remained largely unchecked Tuesday, rescue officials believe these submersibles will play a crucial role in the eventual solution.
NEWS
July 6, 2004 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The breezes off the Delaware Bay seem to yawn as they sweep across this precipice of rock and sand, where fortunes have always ebbed and flowed. But the desolation of Sea Breeze - at the end of a twisting road 30 minutes from the nearest food store - may eventually be its downfall. In the 1870s, Sea Breeze was a thriving bay resort in Fairfield Township, Cumberland County, luring hundreds of summer tourists who arrived daily by steamship. It is now a cluster of 18 tiny summer cottages.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
August 15, 2013 | By Sally Friedman, For The Inquirer
Among my earliest memories is this one: I'm about 3 years old on a beach facing a roaring mystery called "the ocean. " I'm terrified. It's wild and fierce - and I'm so small. But my mother is next to me, and she takes my hand in hers and tells me not to be afraid. Because she is there - because she is my constant in a chaotic world - I meet that wild thing lapping at our feet. And that day, I begin my love affair with the ocean. Ever since, it's been a torrid romance.
NEWS
January 24, 2013 | By Wayne Parry, Associated Press
BELMAR, N.J. - As Jersey Shore towns spend millions of dollars to rebuild boardwalks wrecked by Sandy, some are opting for an additional layer of protection in the form of steel seawalls placed between the boards and the shoreline. The idea is to protect the boardwalks - and the homes and businesses nearby - from the destructive power of storm surges. "It has to be an engineered seawall-and-dune system that will protect the boardwalk and mitigate against the storm surge going into the neighborhood," Belmar Mayor Matthew Doherty said.
NEWS
November 1, 2012 | By Geoff Mulvihill And Maryclaire Dale, ASSOCIATED PRESS
LONG BEACH TOWNSHIP, N.J. - In its tear of destruction, the megastorm Sandy left parts of New Jersey's beloved Shore in tatters, sweeping away beaches, homes, boardwalks and amusement parks. The devastation left the state a blank canvas to redevelop its prized vacation towns. But environmentalists and shoreline planners urged the state to think about how - and if - to redevelop the shoreline as it faces an even greater threat of extreme weather. "The next 50 to 100 years are going to be very different than what we've seen in the past 50 years," said S. Jeffress Williams, a scientist emeritus at the U.S. Geological Survey's Woods Hole Science Center in Massachusetts.
NEWS
July 9, 2012 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, Inquirer Staff Writer
LITTLE BEACH ISLAND, N.J. - Unlike other Jersey Shore barrier islands that have evolved into hometowns and tourist destinations, Little Beach Island is an enigma. "I've often sat and wondered about what kind of a place Little Beach Island would have become had it been developed," said Steven Howard, who has studied the ebb and flow of what is believed to be the last sizable uninhabited barrier island on the Atlantic coast, between Long Beach Island and Brigantine. "What would be its place among all the other [New Jersey]
NEWS
October 5, 2011 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, Inquirer Staff Writer
ATLANTIC CITY - With its curved, 47-story, glass-and-steel facade, the Revel casino resort is designed to "embrace" the beach and Boardwalk in a way that no building on this famous oceanfront has done before. The $2.4 billion megacasino - the state's second-tallest structure, behind the Goldman Sachs Tower in Jersey City - envelopes the onlooker like a giant, sculpted wave. "That was what was the concept from the very beginning," said Robert Andersen, executive vice president of project development for Revel Entertainment Group.
NEWS
May 5, 2010 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
There are tugboats, barges, skimmer boats, and many miles of brightly colored booms being deployed in the desperate effort to curtail the spread of oil in the Gulf of Mexico. But perhaps the most sophisticated tools are doing their work far out of sight, 5,000 feet beneath the water's surface. These 10 unmanned devices are called remotely operated vehicles - ROVs. Some are nearly as big as minivans, and they are the high-tech workhorses of the deep sea. While the gushing oil remained largely unchecked Tuesday, rescue officials believe these submersibles will play a crucial role in the eventual solution.
NEWS
August 27, 2006 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Call it a version of the Peaceable Kingdom gone awry. Biologists say it is a mystery as to exactly why dozens of marine mammals, some sick and starving, have beached along the mid-Atlantic shoreline this summer in areas opposite where they would normally be found. Among the latest finds are five hooded seals, all pups about 6 months old that were brought to the Marine Mammal Stranding Center in Brigantine over the course of the last three weeks. Three were found on New Jersey beaches, one in North Carolina, and one in Virginia.
NEWS
December 4, 2004 | By Kaitlin Gurney INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Frenzied cleanup workers contained the spread of oil from a damaged tanker yesterday and for the first time prevented it from fouling new shoreline along the Delaware River, the Coast Guard said. More than 1,000 workers have spread 94,000 feet of spill-control boom to protect sensitive marshland and tributaries, an effort that before yesterday had failed to stanch the flow of oil from one of the worst spills in the river's history. The Coast Guard doesn't expect any more shoreline to be sullied, a spokesman, Chief Petty Officer Steve Carleton, said.
NEWS
July 6, 2004 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The breezes off the Delaware Bay seem to yawn as they sweep across this precipice of rock and sand, where fortunes have always ebbed and flowed. But the desolation of Sea Breeze - at the end of a twisting road 30 minutes from the nearest food store - may eventually be its downfall. In the 1870s, Sea Breeze was a thriving bay resort in Fairfield Township, Cumberland County, luring hundreds of summer tourists who arrived daily by steamship. It is now a cluster of 18 tiny summer cottages.
NEWS
February 21, 2003 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Each morning for the last four days, Tony Cavalier has stood at the edge of a snowy beachfront and worried. The chief of this Cape May County town's beach patrol knows it is all a numbers game: 29 days until spring, eight weeks until Easter, 13 weeks until Memorial Day weekend. And yesterday, as the region continued to dig out from a massive snowstorm and braced for another weekend of precipitation, Cavalier's worry centered on the beach washing away. Last weekend's high winds and strong waves ate six to eight feet of vertical beach from a 10-block stretch at the north end of North Wildwood.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|