CollectionsShort Order Cook
IN THE NEWS

Short Order Cook

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
July 31, 1995 | By Terri Sanginiti, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Bill Twist arrived home at his North Florida Avenue apartment sometime after 1:30 a.m. Saturday to find his 77-year-old uncle unconscious on the floor - bludgeoned by an intruder and robbed of several hundred dollars in cash. The victim, Earl Twist, was home alone Friday night when the attack occurred, said Atlantic County Prosecutor Jeffrey S. Blitz. Although medical personnel managed to resuscitate Twist briefly, he died en route to Atlantic City Medical Center. Later that night, police arrested Angel Hernandez Camillo, 25, of the first block of South Morris Avenue in Atlantic City, and charged him with aggravated assault and robbery.
NEWS
August 16, 1990 | By Dave Racher, Daily News Staff Writer
The prosecution said Garrett Devore tortured a 22-month-old boy for a week before finally killing him. Devore says he's sorry. "I'd like to apologize," Devore, 28, said yesterday. "I'm sorry for the terrible thing that I did. " But Common Pleas Judge Theodore A. McKee said he couldn't overlook the brutality of the murder of Kareem Gardner on Nov. 11, 1989, and sentenced Devore to 6 1/2 to 15 years in prison. Devore, who pleaded guilty to third-degree murder in May, "tortured the child," Assistant District Attorney Joseph LaBar said yesterday.
NEWS
November 17, 1991 | By Mark Fazlollah, Inquirer Staff Writer
Ewan Clinton, 64, an immigrant from Barbados who worked his way up from short-order cook to assistant director of food services for the Philadelphia prison system, died Friday at his West Philadelphia home. Mr. Clinton attended the All Saints Boys School in Barbados before he moved to South Philadelphia at age 22 to live with an aunt in 1949. He began working as a cook at the old Dawd's Cafe, on South 58th Street. After 11 years in South Philadelphia, he married his neighbor, Nevola Paramount, an immigrant from Trinidad.
NEWS
February 6, 2005 | By Patrick Kerkstra, Adam Fifield and Christine Schiavo INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
It was a fitful Super Bowl's eve for the Eagles faithful. Nestled not-so-snug in their beds, they tossed, they turned, they pondered the fate of T.O.'s ankle and willed the digits on their alarm clocks to move faster, faster. "I don't know what to do with myself," said one. "There's just too much emotion involved," said another. "I just want to get it over with," said many. The two-week wait between the NFC championship game and tonight's Super Bowl in Jacksonville, Fla., has not been easy on the Eagles' most committed fans.
NEWS
February 2, 1989 | By William B. Collins, Inquirer Theater Critic
In Frankie and Johnny in the Clair de Lune, Terrence McNally sets out to make a romantic comedy of the awkward coming together of two of life's losers for whom this might well be a last chance. Considering the odds, one can acknowledge that the playwright has succeeded. The play has been a hit Off-Broadway. Some inherent improbabilities in the psychology work against a wholly satisfying entertainment, and the Philadelphia Theater Company production that opened last night at the Plays and Players Theater is more hindrance than help.
NEWS
September 14, 1989 | By Steve Wartenberg, Special to The Inquirer
Despite success as an athlete, teacher and athletic director, Lew Reynolds had an unfulfilled dream. "I always wanted to be a short-order cook," Reynolds said. A West Chester native, Reynolds was a basketball star at West Chester High (now West Chester Henderson) and Villanova and West Chester Universities, and in March he was inducted into WCU's Hall of Fame. From 1948 to 1981, he was a teacher, coach and athletic director at Unionville High School. He married his high school sweetheart in 1947, and Lew and Helen "Tootie" Reynolds lived happily ever after.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 5, 1995 | By Douglas J. Keating, INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
Terrence McNally sure knows how to get the attention of an audience. His play Frankie & Johnny in the Clair de Lune begins with the sounds of loud lovemaking coming from a darkened stage and, believe me, you're interested immediately in what's going to happen when the lights come up. McNally intends that opening hook of titillation to hold long enough for his two characters - the ones we hear making love - to grab attention on their own....
ENTERTAINMENT
October 11, 1991 | By Desmond Ryan, Inquirer Movie Critic
It's a tall order for a short order cook - winning the wounded heart of a waitress who doesn't want to be the object of unrequired love. An instructive exercise in the difference between what is likable and what is good, Garry Marshall's Frankie & Johnny is a comedy about love and need. Like Johnny, the check-forger who emerges from jail, the film needs work that would transform it from an amiable, eloquently acted pleasantry into a substantial comment on love in the rootless and dangerous '90s.
NEWS
July 1, 1987 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
The rowhouse was filled with the sounds of children's laughter and the noise of running feet. There were youngsters playing in the living room, in the kitchen and on the porch, getting into everything in sight. Watching over them yesterday, like a guardian angel, was Beulah Garrett - mother, nurse, housekeeper, short-order cook, baby sitter and teacher all rolled up in one. To the children, she is Gramps or Aunt Peggy. To the federal government, she is an example to follow - a 61-year-old Tioga woman who raised nine children of her own and opened her home to more than 30 others over the last 29 years, usually without compensation.
NEWS
May 3, 2013 | BY BETH D'ADDONO, For the Daily News
MY FRIEND Sammye has never claimed to be a domestic goddess. "The only reason I have a kitchen is it came with the house," she'll proclaim in her distinctive Mississippi twang. And she's not alone. There are plenty of Americans who say that they don't or can't cook - about 28 percent, or almost a third, according to a survey conducted by Impulse Research on behalf of Bosch home appliances. To someone like myself, who loves everything about the cooking process, how these folks manage to feed themselves is a mystery.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
May 3, 2013 | BY BETH D'ADDONO, For the Daily News
MY FRIEND Sammye has never claimed to be a domestic goddess. "The only reason I have a kitchen is it came with the house," she'll proclaim in her distinctive Mississippi twang. And she's not alone. There are plenty of Americans who say that they don't or can't cook - about 28 percent, or almost a third, according to a survey conducted by Impulse Research on behalf of Bosch home appliances. To someone like myself, who loves everything about the cooking process, how these folks manage to feed themselves is a mystery.
FOOD
April 16, 2009 | By Joyce Gemperlein FOR THE INQUIRER
They're gone for the weekend, so I've brushed aside a tear and rushed to the store for a hunk of blue cheese and a bag of onions. In general, those left behind are expected to sorrow over loved ones leaving on a short holiday. But time alone at home is a gift to cooking martyrs. Day in and day out, we considerately do not serve food that our family members dislike or are unable to eat. In my home, this would also include mushrooms, lima beans, brussels sprouts, tofu, beets, very spicy green curry, and breakfast for dinner - all of which I love.
NEWS
February 6, 2005 | By Patrick Kerkstra, Adam Fifield and Christine Schiavo INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
It was a fitful Super Bowl's eve for the Eagles faithful. Nestled not-so-snug in their beds, they tossed, they turned, they pondered the fate of T.O.'s ankle and willed the digits on their alarm clocks to move faster, faster. "I don't know what to do with myself," said one. "There's just too much emotion involved," said another. "I just want to get it over with," said many. The two-week wait between the NFC championship game and tonight's Super Bowl in Jacksonville, Fla., has not been easy on the Eagles' most committed fans.
NEWS
April 14, 2001 | By Thomas J. Gibbons Jr., Julie Stoiber and Dale Mezzacappa INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
The seven people who died yesterday morning in the fire at an unlicensed rooming house in North Philadelphia were mostly the working poor and people with disabilities, according to relatives and neighbors. At least 12 people lived in the house, both disabled and able-bodied, young and old, officials and neighbors said. Authorities did not release a list of the victims. But according to relatives, they included Wilbur Drake, 75; James Palmer, 54; Lancelot Clark Jr., 59; and Debbie Hewitt, 44. Hewitt had Down syndrome and several had mental problems, neighbors and relatives said.
NEWS
July 31, 1995 | By Terri Sanginiti, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Bill Twist arrived home at his North Florida Avenue apartment sometime after 1:30 a.m. Saturday to find his 77-year-old uncle unconscious on the floor - bludgeoned by an intruder and robbed of several hundred dollars in cash. The victim, Earl Twist, was home alone Friday night when the attack occurred, said Atlantic County Prosecutor Jeffrey S. Blitz. Although medical personnel managed to resuscitate Twist briefly, he died en route to Atlantic City Medical Center. Later that night, police arrested Angel Hernandez Camillo, 25, of the first block of South Morris Avenue in Atlantic City, and charged him with aggravated assault and robbery.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 5, 1995 | By Douglas J. Keating, INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
Terrence McNally sure knows how to get the attention of an audience. His play Frankie & Johnny in the Clair de Lune begins with the sounds of loud lovemaking coming from a darkened stage and, believe me, you're interested immediately in what's going to happen when the lights come up. McNally intends that opening hook of titillation to hold long enough for his two characters - the ones we hear making love - to grab attention on their own....
NEWS
November 17, 1991 | By Mark Fazlollah, Inquirer Staff Writer
Ewan Clinton, 64, an immigrant from Barbados who worked his way up from short-order cook to assistant director of food services for the Philadelphia prison system, died Friday at his West Philadelphia home. Mr. Clinton attended the All Saints Boys School in Barbados before he moved to South Philadelphia at age 22 to live with an aunt in 1949. He began working as a cook at the old Dawd's Cafe, on South 58th Street. After 11 years in South Philadelphia, he married his neighbor, Nevola Paramount, an immigrant from Trinidad.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 11, 1991 | By Desmond Ryan, Inquirer Movie Critic
It's a tall order for a short order cook - winning the wounded heart of a waitress who doesn't want to be the object of unrequired love. An instructive exercise in the difference between what is likable and what is good, Garry Marshall's Frankie & Johnny is a comedy about love and need. Like Johnny, the check-forger who emerges from jail, the film needs work that would transform it from an amiable, eloquently acted pleasantry into a substantial comment on love in the rootless and dangerous '90s.
NEWS
August 16, 1990 | By Dave Racher, Daily News Staff Writer
The prosecution said Garrett Devore tortured a 22-month-old boy for a week before finally killing him. Devore says he's sorry. "I'd like to apologize," Devore, 28, said yesterday. "I'm sorry for the terrible thing that I did. " But Common Pleas Judge Theodore A. McKee said he couldn't overlook the brutality of the murder of Kareem Gardner on Nov. 11, 1989, and sentenced Devore to 6 1/2 to 15 years in prison. Devore, who pleaded guilty to third-degree murder in May, "tortured the child," Assistant District Attorney Joseph LaBar said yesterday.
NEWS
September 14, 1989 | By Steve Wartenberg, Special to The Inquirer
Despite success as an athlete, teacher and athletic director, Lew Reynolds had an unfulfilled dream. "I always wanted to be a short-order cook," Reynolds said. A West Chester native, Reynolds was a basketball star at West Chester High (now West Chester Henderson) and Villanova and West Chester Universities, and in March he was inducted into WCU's Hall of Fame. From 1948 to 1981, he was a teacher, coach and athletic director at Unionville High School. He married his high school sweetheart in 1947, and Lew and Helen "Tootie" Reynolds lived happily ever after.
1 | 2 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|