CollectionsShort Shrift
IN THE NEWS

Short Shrift

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
April 27, 1997 | By Desmond Ryan, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
It's just a 27-minute trip from Jan Krawitz's sheltered '50s childhood in Wyncote to the brutal attack she suffered in an Odessa, Texas, motel in the '80s. There, while shooting a documentary, Krawitz experienced the event that would have a shattering impact on her life - and could easily have inspired a feature film. Instead, she created "In Harm's Way," a remarkably fused transition from serenity to savagery that reminds us that, just as a great story can surpass the reach of a novel, a well-crafted short can register more effectively than a full-length movie.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 20, 2006 | By Howard Shapiro INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Oh, that Martin Short - he's such a kidder. First, he pops up on Broadway in Martin Short: Fame Becomes Me. It's his one-man show. It has a cast of six people. Then he makes his grand entrance. Twice. (Feels so good, why limit it to once?) Then, with the sort of actor's declamation that is heartfelt only on Broadway, his life story begins to unfold - no, unravel - before us, and I can feel my inner voice screaming: No! Not another celebration of My Wonderful and Selfless Artistic Life!
NEWS
June 16, 1994
Attention teachers! Want to strike one final blow for language arts - the art of language? - before the school year ends? Then have your students write a one-page essay that argues for (or against) handing out condoms in school. We're running a contest of sorts, trying to determine whether the U.S. Office of Education's grim report on the status of persuasive writing is on target. (The federal office says, among other things, that only one high school senior in six can write a passable essay that argues a point.
SPORTS
October 29, 2008
There is no outdoor party more hearty than one deferred by the caprices of Mother Nature and the stupidity of Father Baseball. Thought they had you, did they? Because the back end of Charlie Manuel's bullpen will only need nine Tampa Bay Rays outs to short-circuit the inhibition meter, the biggest block party in Philly history should erupt just after Brad Lidge nails down the 27th out of one of the weirdest Game 5s in World Series history. Certainly the longest. I'm giving short shrift to the weather for Game 5, The Conclusion.
NEWS
January 3, 2007 | Erin Gautsche
Cira Centre filled, the new Comcast building glints. Downtown shows greater strength than the suburbs. Buy if they don't own, hold if they do - We've never been a slave to anything. The market gone home, buyers on the sidelines wait to see what happens. What's it like up there - is it safe (white) safe (clean) safe (middle-class)? Is it my home? My small parcel, my lot, my folly, my filet of a nameless neighborhood. If you're not one of the large land projects, you're off the radar.
NEWS
November 28, 1993
Last week was Education Secretary Richard W. Riley's turn to carry the Clinton administration's banner in the low-intensity war that's brewing over TV violence. And frankly, we found his pitch wonderfully appealing. But there was a wishful - perhaps, wistful - quality about it. What Mr. Riley told a pre-Thanksgiving audience at the Hine Junior High School near Capitol Hill was that parents ought to slow down the pace of their lives, turn off the tube, and, among other things, read (or just talk)
NEWS
February 16, 1990
We're not expecting the fate of Philadelphia's growing Hispanic community to be changed very dramatically by a series of bias hearings the city's Human Relations Commission has called for April and May. The gritty "Golden Block" that defines the commercial heart of the Hispanic community isn't suddenly going to sparkle. Long-held prejudices aren't going to vanish overnight. But if some long-held grievances get aired, if some strongly felt perceptions get tested, the hearings may point the way to fairer treatment - or at least force explanations for inaction.
NEWS
January 8, 1987 | By Douglas J. Keating, Inquirer Staff Writer
The one-person show, a fixture of the contemporary stage, usually takes as its subject someone famous enough that the theatergoer has some knowledge of the person and, the producers of the show expect, a desire to learn more. Harry Truman, Emily Dickinson, Mark Twain, Lyndon Johnson, Clarence Darrow and William Faulkner all have had the honor of an actor impersonating them and reflecting on their lives in words that, the audience is led to believe, they would speak, were they able to be on the stage themselves.
NEWS
August 23, 1996 | By Cathy Young
In 1994, the Congressional Quarterly Researcher published an article rehashing the familiar, and by now pretty thoroughly discredited, argument that American schools "shortchange" girls. "Boys tend to receive more attention, and in many cases more positive feedback," the author asserted. "Teachers are far more likely to solicit responses from boys. " This wasn't the writing of some liberal Democrat, but that of Bob Dole's answer to the gender gap, Susan Molinari, the New York congresswoman who was the GOP convention's keynote speaker.
NEWS
September 27, 1991 | by Nels Nelson, Daily News Theater Critic
The 1950s, a decade alternately maligned and recalled with affection for pretty much the same reason - as an era of complacency, order and relative serenity emblemized by an avuncular and phlegmatic president - is gradually coming into its own and assuming a drastically altered image. It's very evident now that the '50s were a bridge leading from the post-war euphoria to the excesses of the '60s. It was the decade of the stalemated Korean War, the desegregation decision, the rise and fall of McCarthyism, the terroristic attack on Congress, the Mad Bomber threat in New York and the Soviet Sputnik.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 7, 2011
City Council may introduce a bill Thursday to change boundaries of the 10 Council districts. Unless a bill passes by Sept. 22, Council members forego their bi-weekly paychecks. But they've already lost some credibility because they've arrogantly handled the process in secret. Council President Anna C. Verna was embarrassed into scheduling two neighborhood hearings and one at City Hall. The timing of hearings - in late summer when the city is emptied for vacations and last night, just after the Labor Day weekend and on the first day of school - was insulting.
NEWS
March 18, 2011 | By John Timpane, Inquirer Staff Writer
The first flush of revolution is like a drug - colors, surging emotions, a beautiful future ahead. But what happens when the drug wears off? That's the question with women's rights in Egypt. Women - at least from the point of view of Western TV coverage - appeared prominently in the Egyptian uprising that led to the resignation of longtime leader Hosni Mubarak. They protested, they spoke to the media, they slept overnight - once unthinkable - in Tahrir Square. Aasma Mahfouz became world famous when she posted a YouTube video Jan. 18 that went viral.
SPORTS
November 30, 2010
DARYL JOHNSTON can relate to what the Eagles players were feeling yesterday as they lugged their sore bodies back out onto the practice field to begin preparations for Thursday night's game against the Houston Texans. Johnston, who spent 11 seasons playing fullback for Dallas, did this fun short-week thing every November because of the Cowboys' annual Thanksgiving Day gig. "It's not easy," he said. "It's tough mentally to get your body prepared right away after a Sunday game. "The biggest thing is, as soon as the [Sunday]
SPORTS
January 17, 2010 | By John Gonzalez, Inquirer Columnist
Another season wasted. Disappointing, but predictable. If we've learned anything by watching Andy Reid and Donovan McNabb and the Eagles over the last 11 years, it's that they love to tweak the story each season but always leave the final chapter unchanged. Hurts your eyes, after a while. And so it continues to go. The Birds are in uncomfortable territory now, firmly entrenched in the muck with other teams that never quite figured out what it takes. You'll find a list of those teams below.
BUSINESS
April 15, 2009 | By Alan J. Heavens INQUIRER REAL ESTATE WRITER
Shane Fisher thought he got a real bargain: a $202,000 three-story house in Lansdowne - $29,000 less than list price - that he could live in and that had two upper floors he could rent. Yet today, Fisher finds himself still scrambling to finance tens of thousands of dollars in unanticipated expenses, including $60,000 in renovation-cost overruns he says could have been avoided if settlement had not taken almost a year to complete. The house he put his deposit on 20 months ago was a short sale, in which the lender accepted less than the balance owed on the mortgage.
SPORTS
October 29, 2008
There is no outdoor party more hearty than one deferred by the caprices of Mother Nature and the stupidity of Father Baseball. Thought they had you, did they? Because the back end of Charlie Manuel's bullpen will only need nine Tampa Bay Rays outs to short-circuit the inhibition meter, the biggest block party in Philly history should erupt just after Brad Lidge nails down the 27th out of one of the weirdest Game 5s in World Series history. Certainly the longest. I'm giving short shrift to the weather for Game 5, The Conclusion.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 7, 2007 | By JEROME MAIDA For the Daily News
The reason to pick up "Fallen Son: The Death of Captain America" No. 2, is for the spot-on portrayal of Spidey. To recap the premise of the series, each issue will have a hero or group of heroes going through one of the "five stages of grief" in the aftermath of the death of the beloved icon. This issue has both teams of Avengers representing "Anger. " Or at least that's what the promo says. Inside the issue are more than 10 characters, and only two, Spider-Man and Ms. Marvel, seem to be exuding any anger.
NEWS
March 16, 2007 | CHRISTINE M. FLOWERS
FOR THE SAKE of argument, imagine that Ann Coulter had called John Edwards a "vagina," not a "faggot. " Instead of being pilloried by both liberals and weak-kneed conservatives and threatened with rehab, praise would've rained down upon her flaxen head. Why am I so certain? Because when three high school juniors from suburban New York defied their principal and pronounced the "v-word" at a school production, they were hailed for their "courage, insight and social responsibility" in a letter to the New York Times.
NEWS
January 3, 2007 | Erin Gautsche
Cira Centre filled, the new Comcast building glints. Downtown shows greater strength than the suburbs. Buy if they don't own, hold if they do - We've never been a slave to anything. The market gone home, buyers on the sidelines wait to see what happens. What's it like up there - is it safe (white) safe (clean) safe (middle-class)? Is it my home? My small parcel, my lot, my folly, my filet of a nameless neighborhood. If you're not one of the large land projects, you're off the radar.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 20, 2006 | By Howard Shapiro INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Oh, that Martin Short - he's such a kidder. First, he pops up on Broadway in Martin Short: Fame Becomes Me. It's his one-man show. It has a cast of six people. Then he makes his grand entrance. Twice. (Feels so good, why limit it to once?) Then, with the sort of actor's declamation that is heartfelt only on Broadway, his life story begins to unfold - no, unravel - before us, and I can feel my inner voice screaming: No! Not another celebration of My Wonderful and Selfless Artistic Life!
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|