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Short Story

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SPORTS
October 17, 1988 | By Paul Hagen, Daily News Sports Writer
At any moment, maybe, the cosmic prankster who has been choreographing this year's World Series might put away the fun-house mirror that is reflecting the proceedings to an amazed audience. And if that happens, perhaps there will be a return to normalcy. Perhaps the Oakland Athletics will rock and sock and begin bashing thrown baseballs the way all the pundits predicted. Perhaps they'll steamroll the Los Angeles Dodgers. Perhaps. All that can be said with certainty at the moment, if we are to believe the evidence of our own eyes, is that the Dodgers can win in dramatic fashion, as they did Saturday night in Game 1 on Kirk Gibson's stunning two-out, two-run homer in the bottom of the ninth.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 31, 2005 | By Jeff Gammage INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The world has gotten so noisy. It's not just trucks and SUVs. It's all the shouting on talk-radio stations, the politicians sniping on TV. It's the jangle of cell phones, the wail of car alarms, the pounding digital bass of backseat boom boxes. Into the din tiptoes I Can't Wait, a little book that's as quiet and as pretty as a snowfall. It tells its story in simple line drawings emboldened by a length of red thread - the cord that guides the narrator through the events, momentous and ordinary, joyous and tragic, that stitch the tapestry of a life.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 26, 1994 | By Carlin Romano, INQUIRER BOOK CRITIC
For the carloads who race east down Bainbridge Street, anxious to avoid South Street's traffic restrictions, the historical marker at 1006 Bainbridge is no more than a blue-and-gold blur. Even to the pedestrian, the plaque's tale, like a modern movie capsule, alerts more than it informs. "Frances Ellen Watkins Harper (1825-1911)," the 1991 signpost announces. "An author, lecturer, and social activist, Harper lived here and devoted her life to championing the rights of slaves and free Blacks.
FOOD
June 6, 2001 | By Michael Klein INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Anthony Bourdain finishes his margarita, orders another beer, pulls hard on another cigarette, and considers what has happened to him: He's become one of Them. Time was, and not too long ago, that he was executive chef at a successful French brasserie in Manhattan, long married, slip-sliding into his mid-40s, with the creaky knees to remind him of it and a modest writing career to get his mind off of it. In what he calls a "moment of marijuana-induced hubris," he dashed off a short story - a dark and dishy insider's tale of the restaurant business - to the New Yorker, which published it under the headline, "Don't Eat Before Reading This.
NEWS
June 20, 2010 | By Amy S. Rosenberg, Inquirer Staff Writer
WILDWOOD - Jack Morey really wants to show you the exploding toilet. He wants to show you how he can take a cleaver and - pow! - chop the head off a squirting rubber chicken. ("We tell the kids they're seagulls," he says.) He wants to get you with the blast of random air, splatter you with puke from the animatronic skeleton, and lead you through the claustrophobic room that closes in on all who enter. But Morey's scariest trick was putting Terry O'Brien - a karaoke host from Cape May best known for killing off his crooners in short stories, collected and published as Murder-Oke - at the helm of his most beloved offspring.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 11, 1990 | Inquirer staff reviews and synopses, compiled by Christopher Cornell
Spike Lee's latest and most controversial film comes to video this week, along with a thoughtful drama of small-town life and the return of a long- missing rocker. DO THE RIGHT THING (1989) (MCA) $89.95. 120 minutes. Danny Aiello, Ossie Davis, Ruby Dee, Spike Lee. Spend 24 hours in the interracial neighborhood of Bedford-Stuyvesant in Brooklyn on the hottest day of the year and see how the escalating temperature and tempers create a round robin of intolerance. Not only is this tragi-comedy a profound statement about racial intolerance, but it establishes its writer/director/star, Lee, as one of America's major directors.
NEWS
October 12, 2007 | By David Patrick Stearns INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Just because many roads in 20th-century art lead back to that 1912 landmark, Pierrot Lunaire, doesn't mean many listeners want to make the trip. Arnold Schoenberg's 45-minute cycle of musically accompanied poems taps the nascent brutality of Italian commedia dell'arte folk culture, breaks from the typical violin-based classical instrumentation, and insists that - in its ongoing examination of moon-inspired madness - the words be chanted and screamed. When presented with two of its grandchildren Wednesday in the Philadelphia debut of Sequitur (the New York-based modern music ensemble)
NEWS
December 27, 1995 | by Tom Di Nardo, Daily News Classical Music Writer
The Metropolitan Opera Company's production of "Madama Butterfly," tonight on Channel 12, focuses on the tragic emotions of its gripping, familiar characters, sacrificing some of the age-encrusted staging tricks. It's a compelling reading with one-set staging and gorgeous lighting that tug the viewer onto that Nagasaki hillside overlooking the sea. It would be hard to imagine better casting than Catherine Malfitano as Cio- Cio San (Butterfly) and Richard Leech (who appeared two seasons ago in our own Opera Company's "Romeo and Juliet")
NEWS
September 24, 1989 | By Nancy Reuter, Special to The Inquirer
The works of 12 authors ranging from Thucydides to Flannery O'Connor will be the featured selections of the Great Books discussion group of the Glassboro area, which begins its new series of meetings 7 p.m. Oct. 5 at the Glassboro Public Library, Center Street and College Avenue. "This is the local chapter of the national Great Books Foundation," said Lewis Bilancio, publicity person for the local group and a former instructor and librarian at Glassboro State College. The Great Books Foundation, which is based in Chicago, publishes a series of books containing works or excerpts of works by writers such as Aristotle, Shakespeare, St. Augustine, Gorki and "all the great thinkers of the past that we all wish we've read," Bilancio said.
NEWS
January 17, 1993 | By Judy Baehr, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
February, traditionally observed as Black History Month, is still two weeks off. But the celebration is already underway at the Camden County Library. At 7 p.m. Wednesday, and again at 7 p.m. on Feb. 3 and March 3, the spotlight will be on masters of the African American short story. The three sessions are part of the library's "Voices and Visions" program, a yearlong discussion series exploring the short story as an art form and a reflection of human experience. On Wednesday, the speaker will be professor Herman Beavers, director of the University of Pennsylvania's English honors program and a specialist in 19th- and 20th-century African American literature.
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NEWS
August 8, 2014 | By William Ecenbarger, For The Inquirer
  SHILLINGTON, Pa. - With a fresh coat of white paint and a green moat of surgically cropped lawn, the house where John Updike grew into adolescence sits prettily along a busy road in this suburb of Reading. But inside is the detritus of renovation-in-progress - bare floorboards, stripped walls, paint cans, bent nails, wood splinters, patches of wallpaper - covered in dust. "These things take time," sighs Maria Mogford, curator of the John Updike Childhood Home. "We wanted it to be ready this fall, but ... it has a way to go. " When it opens, probably next year, the site will join childhood residences-turned-museums of other famed American authors.
NEWS
February 10, 2013
Philadelphia was the home of Silas Weir Mitchell, a 19th-century physician and author who specialized in nervous disorders and hysteria. Mitchell, the son of noted physician John Kearsley Mitchell, was born Feb. 15, 1829, and he attended the University of Pennsylvania and Jefferson Medical College. His career took off after the Civil War, as he delved further into the field of neurology. He was the first to describe erythromelalgia, which was then called "Mitchell's Disease," a disorder that attacks a patient's extremities (hands, arms, and feet)
ENTERTAINMENT
November 24, 2012
By Junot Diaz Riverhead Books. 213 pp. $26.95 Reviewed by Martha Woodall In the words of the MacArthur Foundation, which recently awarded him a $500,000 "genius grant," Junot Diaz is "a fiction writer using vernacular dialogue and spare, unsentimental prose to draw readers into the various and distinct worlds that immigrants must straddle. " True enough. But those measured words fail to convey the dazzle, punch, sly wit, and subtle gravitas that this Dominican-born storyteller packs into his narratives.
NEWS
March 23, 2012 | Molly Eichel Daily News Staff Writer
CHILLS, BOUTS of depression, loss of appetite: These are all symptoms of "The Hunger Games" hangover. After devouring Suzanne Collins' kid-killing trilogy and checking out the long-anticipated film adaptation, we understand if you are left wanting - nay! - needing more. Here's how to get your "Hunger" fix while you wait for the film's second installment, "Catching Fire," which is expected November 2013. Literature "The Giver": While many would point to William Golding's Lord of the Flies as the obvious antecedent to The Hunger Games, we see more in common with Lois Lowry's classic about a society that is so devoid of free will that people can't even see colors.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 24, 2012 | By Nicole Pensiero, For The Inquirer
Two years after singer-songwriter Anaïs Mitchell released the ambitious and career-defining folk opera Hadestown - a musical retelling of the myth of Orpheus and Eurydice set in Depression-era America - she's back with a decidedly different but equally ambitious effort, Young Man in America. Produced by Todd Sickafoose, who also helmed Hadestown, the new album features several New York-based rock and experimental jazz musicians, and has Mitchell inhabiting several musical characters, male and female.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 26, 2012 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Movie Critic
TORONTO - Even just five months ago, in the late-summer days of the Toronto International Film Festival, audiences who saw Albert Nobbs knew: Glenn Close, Oscar nomination. On Tuesday, their presentiment was borne out, and how could it not be? As the title character of the small-budgeted, bighearted tale of a late-19th-century Dubliner who spends her life disguised as a man, Close is funny, poignant, and so deep into her role that you forget you're watching the psycho-stalker of Fatal Attraction , the debauched aristo of Dangerous Liaisons , the lethal litigator of TV's Damages . Instead, you're looking at a tiny, timid creature - so lost in the quiet order of her lonely life, so fearful of being found out - that she does everything she can to not be there.
NEWS
November 27, 2011 | By John M. Glionna, Los Angeles Times
SEOUL, South Korea - There's the grown son bridging the distance with his alcoholic father, an old woman's girlhood memories of working in her grandfather's dumpling restaurant, a student's search for an inspiring former teacher. Like pages ripped from a diary, they are personal stories about love, loss, and just coping with everyday life in this crowded and stressful society. But these private thoughts are presented in a public place: The short tales, signed by their authors, are part of a new storytelling program on Seoul's Metropolitan Subway System.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 3, 2011 | By Dan DeLuca, Inquirer Music Critic
Will Sheff, the leader of Okkervil River, the mostly Austin, Texas-based band that will co-headline The Trocadero on Friday night, with New Jersey punk-rockers Titus Andronicus opening, was on the phone last week from Brooklyn, where he has lived for the last three years. And since it was his first day home after three weeks on the road, Sheff was not only fielding questions about I Am Very Far, the well-wrought and rocked-out new Okkervil River album, he was also taking care of domestic duties.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 31, 2011 | By Elizabeth Wellington, Inquirer Staff Writer
If you've read anything by best-selling author J. California Cooper, you know that she would quickly tell you that basking in the spotlight is like making a direct call to the devil. Humans are their most foolish, she says, when they aren't humble. Extolling these simple truths has made the 79-year-old California native a favorite among generations of readers. Her books, which include seven short-story collections and five novels, are all about learning life's obvious lessons. Cooper's latest novel, Life Is Short but Wide (Anchor Books, 2009)
ENTERTAINMENT
May 13, 2011 | By Wendy Rosenfield, For The Inquirer
It's an interesting pairing, Philadelphia playwright and director Stan Heleva and Mary Wilkins Freeman. He's artistic director of Walking Fish Theatre; she, a New Englander, was the author of A Mistaken Charity , upon which Heleva's script, Mistaken Charity , is based. Wilkins Freeman wrote short stories from the 1880s to the early 1900s for magazines such as Harper's, about women making their way in the world, even as the world conspired to have its way with them. Her female protagonists were tough, no strangers to the rocky earth they farmed, with stony, determined personalities to match.
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