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NEWS
May 31, 1994 | By Gloria A. Hoffner, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Penn Wood High School senior Elizabeth Swinehart is part of a shrinking minority. The 18-year-old is one of only five business majors in a high school of more than 900 students - and she takes dictation. Swinehart's Speedwriting 2 teacher, Joan Myers, said the small number was a sign of the times. "When I graduated from Springfield High School in 1969, women went on to become either nurses, teachers or secretaries," Myers said. "Now, hardly anyone aspires to be a secretary.
NEWS
February 9, 1999 | By Gloria A. Hoffner, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
In the 1970s, when the walls at Ridley High School were decorated with success stories of graduating senior business majors, the photographs of students who had excelled at Secretarial Procedures and Shorthand I and II were placed next to the names of their future employers. Twenty years later, Susan Gatchell, who now teaches at Garnet Valley, says those courses have been replaced with technology and public-speaking classes, filled with students planning on education beyond 12th grade.
NEWS
July 2, 1993 | Daily News wire services
BOSTON A KENNEDY WEDS A 'GUILFORD FOUR' Mary Courtney Kennedy, daughter of the late Sen. Robert F. Kennedy, has married an Irish activist who is free on bail while appealing his conviction in the murder of a British soldier. Kennedy was married June 26 in a private ceremony at sea to Paul Michael Hill of Belfast, Northern Ireland, her family announced yesterday. Hill was one of the "Guildford Four" wrongfully convicted in the 1974 IRA bombings of pubs in Guildford and Woolwich, and co-author of the book "Stolen Years," about his 16-year imprisonment.
NEWS
March 6, 2007
After seeing advertisements in The Inquirer for luxury condos in the former N.W. Ayer & Son building on Washington Square West, I started to reminisce about the five wonderful years I spent working at that advertising agency. Immediately after graduating from Upper Darby High School, Class of 1957, I was employed by N.W. Ayer as a stenographer in the the 10th-floor steno pool. I loved shorthand and typing in school, and always had an interest in writing. Miss Fairchild was our supervisor as well as Mr. Cecil's private secretary.
NEWS
April 29, 1991 | BY JOHN ALLEN PAULOS
Prescriptions for the betterment of U.S. math education have been offered by everyone from Secretary of Education Lamar Alexander down to Mr. Logarithm at PS 101. Although their recommendations - combined with some elements of President Bush's new education plan and significant increases in federal expenditures - could indeed raise math awareness, exploding five crippling misconceptions would be almost as therapeutic. MATH IS COMPUTATION. Mathematics has as much to do with computation as writing has to do with typing.
SPORTS
March 20, 2011 | By Phil Anastasia, Inquirer Staff Writer
Scoring average, down. Assists, up. Wild shots, down. Smart passes, up. Frustrating losses, down. Championship victories, up. That's the shorthand on Isaiah Morton's senior season at St. Augustine Prep. The 5-foot-8 guard broadened his game, played with greater control, and involved more of his teammates in the offense. He still rose up in big moments, and that's why he is The Inquirer's South Jersey Player of the Year in boys' basketball. But the shorthand doesn't tell the whole story of Morton's progress from an eighth-grade phenom new to South Jersey to the senior leader of the only area team to win a state title this season.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 30, 2009 | By Carrie Rickey, Inquirer Movie Critic
For a film boasting the title New in Town , the Renée Zellweger comedy about a corporate executive from sunny Miami sent to snowy Minnesota to downsize a food-manufacturing plant, is awfully familiar. If it feels like a retread of Sweet Home Alabama , that's because one of its screenwriters, C. Jay Cox, penned that script. Still, there are welcome - if intermittent - laughs in this tropical-fish-out-of-water story released as counterprogramming for Super Bowl weekend. Most of the chuckles are elicited by supporting players Siobhan Fallon and J.K. Simmons as crusty Scandinavian- and German Americans who populate the tightly bound, loose-lipped community of New Ulm (actually shot in Winnipeg, Manitoba)
SPORTS
May 29, 2010 | By Phil Sheridan, Inquirer Columnist
CHICAGO - The shorthand on the Stanley Cup Finals matchup is partly right. Flyers? Great story. Blackhawks? Great team. The Flyers' trek from coaching change to last-ditch playoff berth to uber-comeback against Boston to Game 1 of the Finals has been a terrific sports story. It had everything: star power, suspense, rallying from the brink of elimination, dramatic returns from serious injuries. The shorthand isn't wrong about these Blackhawks, either. They are a very good young hockey team that raised its level of play to sweep the San Jose Sharks in the Western Conference finals.
FOOD
May 17, 1998 | By Craig LaBan, INQUIRER RESTAURANT CRITIC
Professor Dick Blood was the curmudgeon of Columbia's graduate school of journalism. Years later, his emphatic words still echo in my head. "You have to eat the meal! You have to eat - the - meal!" A hard-nosed former city editor with a thirst for detail, Blood was insisting to our class that a story about a soup kitchen would not be complete until we had stood in line and eaten our fill. "How does it taste?" he thundered. "It's called reporting, reporting, reporting!
NEWS
November 15, 2005 | By Sandy Bauers INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
As Amber Alerts were flashing on highway signs and police throughout the eastern United States were on the lookout, teenagers in Kara Beth Borden's neighborhoods - geographic and cyber - were following the news with broadband speed. "I HEARD A GUN SHOT! I'M KINDA FREAKED!" a girl who identified herself as Samantha Peters and said she knew Borden wrote on her Web site Sunday morning. In adolescent Web shorthand, misspellings and impromptu forms of punctuation, they blogged onward.
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SPORTS
March 13, 2015 | By Keith Pompey, Inquirer Staff Writer
The 76ers entertained another undermanned team Wednesday night at the Wells Fargo Center. This time, the Chicago Bulls were without three injured starters in point guard Derrick Rose (right knee), shooting guard Jimmy Butler (left-elbow sprain), and center Joakim Noah (left knee) along with their sixth man, Taj Gibson (left ankle). But unlike in Saturday night's win against the Atlanta Hawks, the Sixers were unable to capitalize. Aaron Brooks had a lot to do with that. The point guard finished with a game-high 31 points to lead the Bulls to a 104-95 overtime victory.
SPORTS
March 4, 2015 | BY BOB COONEY, Daily News Staff Writer cooneyb@phillynews.com
TWO INJURIES and the release of a player meant 76ers coach Brett Brown had only 10 players at his disposal last night against the visiting and struggling Toronto Raptors. The team had released JaVale McGee, and both Robert Covington (elbow) and Jason Richardson (wrist) were sidelined after getting hurt in Indiana on Sunday. Though the Raptors were riding a five-game losing streak and were playing without All-Star guard Kyle Lowry (rest), they had a lot more firepower than the Sixers in earning a 114-103 win to improve to 38-22.
NEWS
February 12, 2015
P RAMOD ABICHANDANI, 30, of Fairmount, is a Drexel University professor and founder of LocoRobo, a low-cost, ed-tech robot. The nonprofit is operating out of DreamIt Ventures' accelerator in University City. Abichandani hopes the robot gets students excited about STEM - science, technology, engineering and math. Q: How'd you come up with the idea for LocoRobo? A: When I was working on my Ph.D., I realized there was not much on the market to enable college and K-12 students to get a robot and use it because there was a barrier, which was the programming part.
SPORTS
February 8, 2015 | BY BOB COONEY, Daily News Staff Writer cooneyb@phillynews.com
BOSTON - With Michael Carter-Williams down with a foot injury for last night's game against the Boston Celtics, it was only natural that coach Brett Brown would start 6-9 JaKarr Sampson at lead guard. After all, as Sampson said, "the last time I played there was when I was playing for my father in, like, the seventh grade. " That's where this Sixers team is right now, and it didn't get much easier when Brown had to go to his bench for Sampson, and, later, turn to Tim Frazier, the Penn State product who had his first practice with the team on Thursday after being signed to a 10-day contract.
SPORTS
January 17, 2015 | By Mark Macyk, Inquirer Staff Writer
Drexel's injury list has grown so long that the Dragons had only eight healthy players available Thursday night for their 54-35 loss to James Madison. On the bright side, Bruiser Flint's funny bone still seems to be OK. "Did you all watch it?" the coach said, laughing, when asked what went wrong. "I know you all watched the game. The only thing is you don't have to watch it again like I do. " Drexel made just 24 percent of its shots from the floor and lost for the ninth time in 10 games.
SPORTS
January 15, 2015 | By Keith Pompey, Inquirer Staff Writer
In a common theme for the 76ers, they faced a shorthanded squad Tuesday night. This time, it was the Atlanta Hawks' turn to rest some of their normal starters. All-star power forward Paul Millsap and small forward DeMarre Carroll were inactive. Standout point guard Jeff Teague was dressed but never left the bench. And they might have made a big difference, as Teague and Millsap are the team's leading scorers. But unlike their previous two matchups against the Brooklyn Nets and Indiana Pacers, the Sixers were unable to take advantage of an undermanned squad.
SPORTS
January 8, 2015 | By Keith Pompey, Inquirer Staff Writer
Fresh off their first home win of the season, the 76ers will look to ride that momentum Wednesday night. The Sixers (5-28) will entertain the Milwaukee Bucks at the Wells Fargo Center, and a victory would give them consecutive home wins for the first time since they beat the Miami Heat and Chicago Bulls in the first two home games last season. The Sixers faced a shorthanded opponent Monday in a 95-92 victory over the Cleveland Cavaliers, and the Bucks are in a similar situation.
SPORTS
January 7, 2015 | BY BOB COONEY, Daily News Staff Writer cooneyb@phillynews.com
IF YOU HEAR a phrase such as "flip-and-follow" and you're relating to this season's 76ers, you normally wouldn't think of anything good. But last night, the "play" worked to perfection for most of the game against the Cleveland Cavaliers, executed by the two point guards who haven't had the best results playing with each other for most of the season. And they saved their best execution for the final moments in the Sixers' first home win of the season. The Sixers had the ball with 18.9 seconds to play and trailed by one. The design was for a pick-and-roll for Michael Carter-Williams, who had already had very good success with that all night.
SPORTS
January 7, 2015 | By Keith Pompey, Inquirer Staff Writer
This was as good an opportunity as any for the 76ers to get a victory at home. The Cleveland Cavaliers came to town minus three injured starters in LeBron James, Kyrie Irving and Anderson Varejao. Then the Cavs sat Dion Waiters, their fourth-leading scorer, while his trade to the Oklahoma City Thunder went through. Those four players combined to average 65.9 points for the Cavs. The Sixers took full advantage, escaping with a 95-92 victory Monday night before 17,771 delighted fans at the Wells Fargo Center.
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