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ENTERTAINMENT
February 6, 2012
SMASH. 10 tonight, NBC 10.   I'VE SPENT months trying to resist NBC's "Smash," I really have. Not only does that title - "Smash"! - lead with its chin, but as a show about show business, it has critically acclaimed heartbreak written all over it. And I know my gushing about it isn't going to help, especially if you're already tired of hearing about it. So I'm not going to gush. Much. Instead, because I've considered all of them, I'm going to offer a few reasons you might not want to bother with "Smash," which premieres tonight after a two-hour episode of "The Voice," the singing competition that's currently the only decent lead-in NBC has to offer: *  You're already sick to death of Fox's "Glee," and a show about the making of a Broadway musical sounds an awful lot like "Glee" for grown-ups.
NEWS
October 21, 2012 | By David Hiltbrand, Inquirer Columnist
Now, of course, I'm ashamed to admit it, but I was one of those who complained that last season   of The Walking Dead , which transpired mostly on bucolic Greene Farm, was too civilized. "Too much walking, not enough dead," I wrote. I imagine I'm going to feel pretty stupid about making that statement - just as soon as I get over the lingering nausea that this week's grotesque gorefest induced. The Season 3 opener was like an X-rated grindhouse film, with a body count higher than the Rose Bowl's.
NEWS
March 11, 1990 | By Michele McCreary, Special to The Inquirer
Lower Makefield resident Henry Ford's decision to become a professional actor two years ago cost him a bundle. It all began in 1983, when Ford took a small part in a play staged at a high school. "When I walked out on stage at age 49, I thought, 'Why didn't I do this before?' " In 1988 he sold his executive job search firm, H.R.F. Associates of Newtown - along with one of his two houses and the silver - to finance his "fascination with the arts. " He said his career change had cost him $250,000 so far in lost income.
NEWS
March 6, 1988 | By Andy Wickstrom, Special to The Inquirer
As you may recall from 1978's National Lampoon's Animal House, nudity and sexual humiliation loom large in the sophomoric humor of director John Landis. His taste hasn't changed much in the intervening years, as his 1986 movie Amazon Women on the Moon bears witness. How's this for hilarity? A "Pet-house Plaything" centerfold strolls along the streets of Los Angeles totally nude and no one looks askance; in ditzy voice-over she says it's a city where she "can be herself. " Or this?
FOOD
January 31, 1990 | By Gerald Etter, Inquirer Food Writer
If you enjoy entertaining and adhere to the principle that limited kitchen time, health consciousness and casual atmosphere are essential to home cooking, Dinner Party (Harper & Row, $27.50) is a road map to the perfect gathering. Food writer Jane Freiman has assembled 165 menus with more than 200 recipes designed for entertaining with ease and good taste. It's a book geared to mixing and matching courses to accommodate a variety of tastes and to accomplish the task of serving simple yet sophisticated food.
NEWS
May 24, 1990 | By G.J. Donnelly, Special to The Inquirer
Easttown Township local businesses and services are bracing for some excitement as well as a few headaches during the 94th annual Devon Horse Show and County Fair. More often than not the headaches will involve parking. "Sometimes it's a problem, sometimes it's not," said Ed Zarasian, who runs the Sunoco service station adjacent to the fairgrounds. "There is enough space, but people don't listen to what the horse show people tell them. They want to save a couple of dollars. The horse show guys organize (parking)
ENTERTAINMENT
March 10, 1995 | By Jack Lloyd, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
"What we're doing," said Bob Andre, "is bringing back real show business. None of that jive. Sure, we can be contemporary, but this is the real thing - real entertainment. What we try to do is fill people's bellies with entertainment. " Bob Andre is half of the team called Andre & Cirell, and they are starring in their own mini-revue featuring the Castle Dancers in the King's Court Showroom at Trump's Castle through March 19. The show is called Just Kidding. Bob Andre and Frank Cirell have been a team for the last 20 years, and, as Andre stressed, there aren't that many comedy teams left these days.
NEWS
January 16, 2012 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
The first thing anybody needs to know about Ludwig Live! is that the cabaret show, playing at the Kimmel Center's Innovation Studio, has little to do with Beethoven or even having laughs at his expense. Using tired devices such as the clash of high and low art, Ludwig Live! , which opened Friday, explores how intentionally ramshackle showbiz somehow holds the stage. The concept is that cranky old Beethoven - played by Charles Lindberg, in the cheapest wig imaginable - is somehow back from the dead and taking his story on the road with a troupe of actors.
NEWS
December 24, 1990 | By John Corr, Inquirer Staff Writer
Allen Shore found his inspirational message, the one that turned his life around and made him "angelic," in the Wall Street Journal. He was drinking coffee from a big mug that morning in 1984 with the newspaper spread across his desk. A lean, athletic-looking businessman, he was, at age 57, successful, active and almost happy. Then he saw the message that would make him happy. "It was a little ad, saying they were looking for someone to invest in the making of an original-cast record album," Shore recalled, drinking coffee from a big mug on his desk at the Elkins Park headquarters of his company, Perfect Host Enterprises.
NEWS
December 6, 1986 | By Sandra McIntosh, Special to The Inquirer
The smell of smoke still hung yesterday over what little remained of the costume shop owned by Elaine Scanlan and her mother, Doris Jester. But the pair insisted that the Merry Makers troupe would still march up Broad Street in the Mummers Parade. "While I stood and watched the shop burn, Mom was on the phone in the restaurant across the street getting the measurements so we could remake the Mummers outfits," Scanlan said at her home, where the family set up a makeshift sewing factory almost immediately after the Monday morning fire.
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