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Show Business

BUSINESS
June 24, 1997 | By Nathan Gorenstein and Richard Sine, FOR THE INQUIRER
Chilton Publishing Co., the Radnor-based publisher of trade magazines and automotive how-to books, is being broken up and its pieces sold off by its owner, the Walt Disney Co. A European group has agreed to purchase Chilton's trade magazines, research service and trade show business for $447 million, and negotiations are under way to sell off the automotive book publishing business, Disney said yesterday. Nearly 1,000 people are employed at the company's Radnor campus, and 400 more work for Chilton around the nation and overseas.
NEWS
June 1, 1997 | By Jennifer Weiner, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A man walking along North Broad Street yesterday squinted toward the New Freedom Theater, where hundreds upon hundreds of people - babies in strollers to women leaning on canes - formed a line that looped and twisted its way around two blocks. "What's going on in there?" he asked. "They giving away money?" Actually, no. But the producers of Beloved were looking for extras for the movie based on the best-selling novel by Toni Morrison, who wrote of Sethe, a former slave haunted by her past and the infant daughter she sacrificed.
SPORTS
July 25, 1996 | By Tim Panaccio, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Cornerback Troy Vincent yesterday became the latest Eagle to suffer a hamstring pull, raising the number of such injuries on the team to six. Wide receiver Irving Fryar, also thought to have injured a hamstring, suffered what was later diagnosed as a pulled groin. Who said training camp isn't dangerous? With fullbacks Kevin Turner and Fred McCrary, running back Charlie Garner, free safety Brian Dawkins and cornerback Jerome Henderson already limping on hamstring pulls, a question arises.
BUSINESS
November 6, 1995 | By Robert DiGiacomo, FOR THE INQUIRER
Terry Smith learned early on that show biz wasn't all glamour. Smith, the owner of Showstoppers Unlimited, a talent agency in Media, got her big break at 16, sewing sweat pads into Mickey Rooney's costumes for the musical George M at the Valley Forge Music Fair. It wasn't Broadway, but the theatrical bug bit. During college, Smith spent summers working as a costumer and chorus member in touring productions of musicals such as 1776 with Dean Jones and Hugh O'Brien, and Man of La Mancha with Howard Keel.
NEWS
June 13, 1995 | By Jordana Horn, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Every night, 21-year-old Southampton native Danny Cistone gets to relive a little bit of high school. For some people, this would be their worst nightmare. For Cistone, it's show business - and an opportunity to make up for lost time. For 9 1/2 months and across 30 cities, he's transformed his moussed black hair into a pompadour and donned a black leather jacket as Sonny, the troublemaking greaser in the national tour of the hit musical Grease! The tour has taken him from Boston to San Francisco, and will be heading off to Hawaii.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 10, 1995 | By Jack Lloyd, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
"What we're doing," said Bob Andre, "is bringing back real show business. None of that jive. Sure, we can be contemporary, but this is the real thing - real entertainment. What we try to do is fill people's bellies with entertainment. " Bob Andre is half of the team called Andre & Cirell, and they are starring in their own mini-revue featuring the Castle Dancers in the King's Court Showroom at Trump's Castle through March 19. The show is called Just Kidding. Bob Andre and Frank Cirell have been a team for the last 20 years, and, as Andre stressed, there aren't that many comedy teams left these days.
BUSINESS
October 24, 1994 | By Vyola P. Willson, FOR THE INQUIRER
There are some things that people take very personally. They are whispered about but seldom discussed openly in the workplace. What one ethnic, racial or social group finds amusing about another, for example. How - sometimes whether - a person speaks English. How a boss asks, or orders, someone to do something. Sexual orientation and how it is expressed. Why someone walks, talks or looks "funny," or weighs too much. So the producers of an unusual musical decided to sing about them instead.
BUSINESS
June 30, 1994 | By Jerry W. Byrd, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Row upon well-ordered row of exhibits stretched along the floor of the Convention Center. Eight aisles, smiling exhibitors on each side and 7,200 potential customers, their names and those of their companies pinned to their lapels, lugging brochure-filled shopping bags from booth to booth. The event, the 15th annual Greater Philadelphia Business Fair, was no place to be without a business card. At the VTV Interactive booth, guerilla marketing guru Jay Conrad Levinson spoke from far away, via a teleconferencing setup, while at a luncheon downstairs, bestselling author Michael Gerber animatedly explained to 200 guests, at $20 each, why most businesses don't work.
NEWS
June 19, 1994 | By Linda Loyd, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Jack Steck, 97, vaudevillian and Philadelphia radio and television broadcast pioneer, died Friday at the Bryn Mawr Terrace convalescent home in Haverford. He had lived in Havertown for 42 years. A 35-year veteran of WFIL radio and TV (now WPVI), where he was producer, programmer and talent scout, Steck hired Dick Clark, who later hosted the live TV dance show American Bandstand in the 1950s. He launched Larry Ferrari's television organ program, and he created Happy the Clown. "He is an era all by himself," said WPEN radio disc jockey, Bill (Wee Willie)
NEWS
March 3, 1994 | By Jeff Eckhoff, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
In short, environmentalists love it, business people call it oppressive, and the politicians just think the whole thing's a pain. But one way or another, state and regional officials warn, the mandates of the Clean Air Act amendments are here to stay - and if you do business in the Philadelphia area, you'd better start planning for them now. That was the message spread Tuesday at a special seminar sponsored by the state Department of Resources...
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