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Show Business

BUSINESS
October 24, 1994 | By Vyola P. Willson, FOR THE INQUIRER
There are some things that people take very personally. They are whispered about but seldom discussed openly in the workplace. What one ethnic, racial or social group finds amusing about another, for example. How - sometimes whether - a person speaks English. How a boss asks, or orders, someone to do something. Sexual orientation and how it is expressed. Why someone walks, talks or looks "funny," or weighs too much. So the producers of an unusual musical decided to sing about them instead.
BUSINESS
June 30, 1994 | By Jerry W. Byrd, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Row upon well-ordered row of exhibits stretched along the floor of the Convention Center. Eight aisles, smiling exhibitors on each side and 7,200 potential customers, their names and those of their companies pinned to their lapels, lugging brochure-filled shopping bags from booth to booth. The event, the 15th annual Greater Philadelphia Business Fair, was no place to be without a business card. At the VTV Interactive booth, guerilla marketing guru Jay Conrad Levinson spoke from far away, via a teleconferencing setup, while at a luncheon downstairs, bestselling author Michael Gerber animatedly explained to 200 guests, at $20 each, why most businesses don't work.
NEWS
June 19, 1994 | By Linda Loyd, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Jack Steck, 97, vaudevillian and Philadelphia radio and television broadcast pioneer, died Friday at the Bryn Mawr Terrace convalescent home in Haverford. He had lived in Havertown for 42 years. A 35-year veteran of WFIL radio and TV (now WPVI), where he was producer, programmer and talent scout, Steck hired Dick Clark, who later hosted the live TV dance show American Bandstand in the 1950s. He launched Larry Ferrari's television organ program, and he created Happy the Clown. "He is an era all by himself," said WPEN radio disc jockey, Bill (Wee Willie)
NEWS
March 3, 1994 | By Jeff Eckhoff, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
In short, environmentalists love it, business people call it oppressive, and the politicians just think the whole thing's a pain. But one way or another, state and regional officials warn, the mandates of the Clean Air Act amendments are here to stay - and if you do business in the Philadelphia area, you'd better start planning for them now. That was the message spread Tuesday at a special seminar sponsored by the state Department of Resources...
ENTERTAINMENT
February 20, 1994 | By Ann Kolson, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
After nine cities, two more to go, Ben Stiller is learning the real work of moviemaking. Interviews, Q & A sessions, news conferences, photos. Fueling up with gulps of room service grub in between. Actor and first-time director Stiller, 28, is in town to stump for Reality Bites, an edgy romantic comedy starring Winona Ryder and Ethan Hawke, which opened Friday. "All this is totally separate from the process of making the movie," says the fledgling filmmaker, laughing. "I thought it was over Christmas Eve when I finished the mix. " As son of actor-comedians Jerry Stiller and Anne Meara, the business is in his blood.
BUSINESS
September 26, 1993 | By Susan Warner, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In its first 200 years, the United States built the world's strongest economy on its rich farmland and powerhouse industries - steel, oil, railroads, automobiles. Now, it is a nation whose vital economic assets include Mickey Mouse, Captain Kirk and Cheers. Last week's high-stakes bidding war for Paramount Communications Inc., the producer of The Godfather, Entertainment Tonight, and Wayne's World, dramatizes the economic importance of the U.S. entertainment industry. Entertainment - movies, music, cable television and home video - brings an estimated $50 billion to the U.S. economy.
NEWS
February 13, 1992 | by Kathleen Shea, Daily News Staff Writer
Julie Wilson - Queen of Cabaret, epitome of soignee, apex of style. The quintessential "saloon chantoosie. " The one who played all the legendary rooms, interpreting with singular drama and gravelly vocal style the great popular American art songs. Fifty years in show business - 43 of them famous after the night she knocked them dead at the Mocambo club in Hollywood wearing a girlfriend's gown and $27,000 worth of borrowed jewels. The one still after all these years with the chignon, the gardenia ear garnish (in tribute to Billie Holiday)
NEWS
February 2, 1992 | By Louis R. Carlozo, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
They don't take bets at Garden State Park like the kind Stephen Gorse made a few weeks back. Gorse was so sure the forthcoming Kenny Rogers concert at Garden State's Pavilion Theatre would be a winner, he put his home on the line to make sure the show would get proper financial backing. "Let's just say that I signed a note," said Gorse, president of the Greater Cherry Hill Convention and Visitors Bureau. "The note's been paid off. It was paid off two weeks early, that's how well the ticket sales went.
NEWS
June 29, 1991 | By John Corr, Inquirer Staff Writer
My car is so slow, it's got dead bugs on the back window. Will Miller, the comic with the Main Line, mainstream, mainly respectable look, commands the stage in the little comedy club - the perfect picture of confidence in front of a noisy, occasionally intrusive audience. And why not? The guy's got two day jobs. He is a minister at a handsome, century-old Baptist church in a wealthy North Jersey suburb, and he is a clinical psychologist with experience in treating schizophrenic crack addicts as well as patients "with more sophisticated defenses.
NEWS
April 4, 1991 | By Ann Kolson, Inquirer Staff Writer
He looks every bit the successful businessman: immaculate dark blue suit, beautifully patterned silk tie, gray ponytail, a half-dozen enormous turquoise-and-silver rings, and at least that number of heavy silver bracelets. (We're not talking IBM here.) But singer Richie Havens has always gone his own way. It seemed as if the whole world was listening when Havens, now 50, opened the Woodstock Music and Arts Fair in August 1969 with his song "Freedom. " His singular voice, husky, impassioned, tinged with pathos, was accompanied by his insistent, driving guitar.
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