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Show Tunes

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NEWS
May 4, 1992 | By Sam Wood, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
He is definitely not hip. Never has been. Never will be. As a singer he'll never touch Sinatra, Bennett or Torme. And songwriters Andrew Lloyd Webber and Stephen Sondheim certainly don't have to regard him as major competition. But don't underestimate Barry Manilow. He raised the curtain Friday night at the Mark G. Etess Arena in Atlantic City for two evenings of "Showstoppers," a revue of seldom-heard show tunes and his own radically reworked songs. Engaging and sincere - all charm, no smarm - Manilow paid homage to the golden age of pop and vaudeville.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 10, 1998 | By Leonard W. Boasberg, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Those show tunes of the 1940s and 1950s go on and on. And on. And why not? You can hum them. You can whistle them. You can sing them. You can dance to them. Which is what I wanted to do several times Sunday during the Philly Pops concert, aptly titled "The Golden Age of Broadway," at the Academy of Music. Well, you don't dance in the aisles at the Academy of Music. You just sit back and enjoy as Peter Nero leads the Pops through a generous sampling of show tunes from such classic musicals as South Pacific, The King and I, Carousel, Song of Norway, Call Me Madam, The Music Man, Guys and Dolls and Kismet.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 23, 1995 | By Leonard W. Boasberg, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The opening concert of the current Philly Pops program at the Academy of Music was flawless - outstanding, from the moment Peter Nero struck up the orchestra with Gershwin's "Strike Up the Band" to the "Liberty Bell March," with which Nero has traditionally closed Pops performances since 1979. The program, titled "Broadway Gold," is devoted mainly to show tunes of the 1940s and 1950s. ("Strike Up the Band," which goes back to 1927, is one exception; Cole Porter's "Night and Day," a 1930s classic, is another.
NEWS
July 25, 2001 | By David Patrick Stearns INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Soprano Dawn Upshaw exists in as many versions as Microsoft Outlook. There's the art-song recitalist, the Metropolitan Opera star, the contemporary music chanteuse who premiered Jacob Druckman's Counterpoise here in 1994, and now the interpreter of classic American show tunes, from George Gershwin to Vernon Duke. That's the version that appeared Monday with the Philadelphia Orchestra at the Mann Center for the Performing Arts, and is possibly the most artistically gratifying guise of all. With Upshaw, that's saying a lot. It all comes down to language.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 3, 1998 | By Kevin L. Carter, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Pianist Eric Reed, at 28, has established his credentials in jazz. He has played with Wynton Marsalis' septet for the last six years. He is a member of the Lincoln Center Jazz Orchestra, which plays the Mann tonight. He has released several acclaimed records on his own. So why did he decide to make an album of Broadway show tunes? "I was trying to reach a different demographic than the typical jazz audience," Reed said. "The jazz audience can be counted on to buy a certain number of records, and that is a given.
NEWS
July 20, 1995 | By Valerie Reed, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
A new Bucks County dinner theater is premiering Alice in Broadwayland, a musical revue complete with 22 Broadway show tunes. Capers Dinner Theatre in Pipersville opened this month with the production, which is scheduled to run through October. When Alice falls through a trapdoor and finds herself under the Manhattan theater district, the way is opened for a lively cast of characters to belt out the Broadway hits. "It's a vehicle for the music, and it's a comedy," said the director and writer, Lynn Thomas of Bedminster.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 14, 1996 | By Lesley Valdes, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Joan Morris and Bill Bolcom's passion for old-time music isn't everyone's cup of something, but a few tunes into their popular cabaret recitals and even people who don't think they like this stuff can get hooked. Morris is a gifted singing actor, emphasis on actor, who really knows how to tell a story. She also knows how to use her mezzo-soprano stylistically, catching the flutters and inflections of decades you and she never knew. It's a voice with some limitations, but no matter - when she struts her stuff doing "Ida, Sweet as Apple Cider," or "Cleopatterer" (this one with all manner of snazzy little Egyptian arm motions)
ENTERTAINMENT
December 17, 2004 | By TOM DI NARDO For the Daily News
Some of our most popular holiday offerings share this weekend's calendar with a diverse palette of vocal fare. First off, though, there's a newcomer on the scene, though one with long experience. Marc Mostovoy, founder of the Chamber Orchestra of Philadelphia back in 1964, has become a pioneer in developing new ways to add visual components to the presentation of music. Mostovoy is launching the Kimmel Center's new "See Hear!" series of programs with live and digital projections in "A Colonial Holiday," leading a 20-piece orchestra, vocal soloists from the Academy of Vocal Arts, the choir from the esteemed Girard Academic Music Program and even Ben Franklin and his glass armonica.
NEWS
September 20, 1992 | By Cynthia J. McGroarty, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Mention Broadway to William S. Clement and he'll swoon. Then he'll pull himself together and discourse smartly on that musical institution, its triumphs and clunkers, and the composers and stars who have peopled it. He'll even put a record on the stereo and sing along. Last week, in the room that holds most of his 380-album collection of Broadway musicals and movie soundtracks, it was Ella Fitzgerald's velvet-voiced rendition of Lorenz Hart's "I Wish I Were in Love Again. " "It's one of the best love songs ever written.
NEWS
July 3, 1997 | By Melissa Milewski, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Throughout July, the Delaware County Summer Festival will continue its 22d annual celebration in Rose Tree Park with a play by a theater company, and local musicians playing show tunes and country and popular music. The Atlantic Brass Band, a British-style band that plays marches and popular music, will take the stage Wednesday. In the event of rain, the location will be Penncrest High School in Middletown off Route 352. The Rose Tree Shakespeare Company will put on Shakespeare's Comedy of Errors in a contemporary setting, a Southern California beach in the 1960s, next Thursday and July 11-12.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 19, 2012 | By Shaun Brady, FOR THE INQUIRER
Kurt Wagner sings about "taking pictures with a phone" on the song "Nice Without Mercy. " But the Lambchop front man probably never anticipated audiences taking the line to heart. At Lambchop's show Wednesday night at World Cafe Live, a few couples came down to the front of the stage to pose for photos, with a bemused Wagner as their backdrop. "We'll sign the wedding photos you've been taking for an additional charge," he joked later, shaking his head and proclaiming the night Lambchop's "weirdest" gig. That was after one of the photogenic pairs climbed onto the stage, slow-dancing to a cover of Billy Joe Shaver's theme song from Squidbillies.
NEWS
April 6, 2012 | By Maria Archangelo
By Maria Archangelo I had my first glimmer of hope when I saw my sometimes self-conscious 14-year-old son play air drums with Max Weinberg to "Jackson Cage. " But it was when he sang "Thunder Road" with 20,000 of the faithful that I knew I had him. I had taken my son to the church of Bruce Springsteen, and he came out a believer. Amen. Going to see Springsteen with my son was a thrilling prospect, but I grew anxious as the day approached. My son is a musician, so I knew he would be impressed by the mighty talent of the E Street Band.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 29, 2011
Q: I know this sounds silly, but I met a great guy online who's really into me. We've gone out a few times but I can't get over the feeling that he's gay. He holds my hands and kisses me and stuff, but it's little things that bug me. Like for instance, the way he walks. He also does things that don't seem all that masculine. The other day I asked him point-blank if he was gay and he said no. I'm still not convinced, but it's hard to meet someone you really like, and my biological clock is ticking.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 19, 2011 | By Howard Shapiro, Inquirer Staff Writer
The enjoyable Chasin' Dem Blues, playing in a vibrant production at the Delaware Theatre Company, has an apt title for two reasons: The show chases away the blues by singing the blues - a time-honored way to exorcise them. And it chases down the blues in order to document the history of the musical form. What's not apt, but hype, is the show's subtitle: Untold Story of Paramount Records. The show, written and directed by Kevin Ramsey, focuses on the company as a way to explore the history and dynamics of the blues.
NEWS
December 15, 2010 | By Howard Shapiro, Inquirer Staff Writer
We will, we will rock you! - that's the anthem of the classic rock band Queen, but it's also one of several anthems in Parenting 101 , the frisky, clever revue that has settled into the bottom floor of the Kimmel Center for a long run. But in Parenting 101 , the song has a specific meaning. A set of new parents sing it in a baby's bedroom. And it's 4 a.m. Parenting 101 takes popular and show tunes of past decades and sets them to lyrics about family life.
NEWS
December 6, 2010 | By Bobby Olivier, Inquirer Staff Writer
More than six months after a roof collapse destroyed much of the Grand Theatre in Williamstown, five area theater groups are lending a helping hand to one of their own. In support of rebuilding the 86-year-old theater, the troupes will participate in "The Grand Cabaret," a musical variety show next weekend at the Eagle Theatre in Hammonton. All proceeds of performances Thursday, Friday, and Saturday will benefit the "Make It Grand Again" fund, created by the Road Company Inc., the owner of the building, to reconstruct its theater home.
NEWS
July 15, 2009 | By Tirdad Derakhshani INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
MJ tribute up in the air Rumors, speculation, and innuendos continue as the promoter of Michael Jackson's London tour, Randy Phillips, says he's still mulling over whether he will organize an MJ tribute concert in London to mark the One Gloved One's b'day in late August. (The show, he tells BBC 6 Music radio station, would be broadcast globally.) Randy promises he'll make a decision by week's end. Yeah, right. Heigl: No more PG-13 for me! Katherine Heigl wants to get down and dirty.
SPORTS
September 2, 2008 | By John Gonzalez, Inquirer Columnist
Remember back in the day when you wanted to fight someone at school? You almost never called the guy out face-to-face. You used intermediaries. You talked trash about your adversary through the grapevine until he didn't have a choice. Jimmy picks his nose. Jimmy was adopted. Jimmy plays with Barbies and listens to show tunes. That kind of thing. Before you knew it, you were throwing down out near the swings. Right now, Lito Sheppard is trying really hard to get Andy Reid to meet him on the playground.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 2, 2008 | By ROBERT STRAUSS For the Daily News
The magic of YouTube brings Debbie Gibson back. With her pug nose, toothy smile and pageboy outfits, she was nothing less than the Britney Spears of the late 1980s. Her hits, including two No. 1s - "Foolish Beat" and "Lost in Your Eyes" - were not-a-girl, not-yet-a-woman love songs, slightly overdubbed, but clearly honed and melodic. Gibson, though, skipped the rehab, the over-paparazzied life, the lingering downside of teen stardom. By her mid-20s, she had acquired the grown-up name "Deborah" and was doing Broadway and national touring musicals.
NEWS
April 25, 2006 | By David Hiltbrand INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Put away the acne cream and break out the champagne. This is the year American Idol came of age. Even though Fox's singing contest has been camped atop the Nielsen heap for three years, in the past Idol has always been considered a cheesy, teenybopper fad. But as its audience has continued to expand (up again this season 14 percent), the ultimate karaoke party has become a legitimate monster. "A confluence of cultural factors have made this show not just a hit but a supernova in the TV universe," says John Rash, media buyer for Campbell Mithun, a Minneapolis advertising agency.
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