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Shredder

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LIVING
September 21, 2007 | By Alan J. Heavens INQUIRER REAL ESTATE WRITER
Autumn arrives Sunday, bringing with it the perennial dilemma: what to do with all those leaves, branches and twigs nature drops on lawn and sidewalk? One solution: Turn them into mulch with a leaf shredder or wood chipper. Need to know: You can buy a shredder or a chipper or both, or a combination of the two. Which is the best for you depends on the size of your property and what falls onto it. If you own an acre with lots of trees, a gas-powered chipper/shredder may be what you need.
BUSINESS
April 1, 2012 | By Linda Loyd, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Camden Iron & Metal and its heap of crushed scrap at the foot of the Platt Memorial Bridge near the airport are moving to Camden, along with 175 jobs and the promise of 50 hires. The unsightly junkyard of crushed cars and washing machines that is synonymous with 26th Street and Penrose Avenue - the gateway to Philadelphia for millions of visitors - will disappear after the scrap recycler installs, by the end of this year, a modern new shredder at Atlantic and Front Streets in Camden.
NEWS
November 15, 2012
DEAR HARRY: Since last spring, two of my friends' identities were almost stolen. Fortunately, both were able to stop it from happening, and neither was hurt. However, they have been urging me to be more cautious. As a result, I went out and bought a shredder. The directions in the manufacturer's literature would have me shred everything short of our paper napkins. I figure that they exaggerate in order to get me and others to overuse the shredders. What's the real deal here, Harry?
SPORTS
November 29, 2011 | By Michael Vitez, Inquirer Staff Writer
Owen Schmitt played tuba as a boy in small-town Wisconsin and loved it. But he also happened to be a football star. He couldn't score touchdowns and march with the band at halftime. So he chose touchdowns over tuba. He went to the West Virginia University, where he became a football superstar. In his last year, he didn't have many classes and began to skip the ones he had because he discovered Guitar Hero. He loved Guitar Hero. He thought to himself it would be really, really cool if he could actually play guitar.
NEWS
December 29, 1987 | By ROBERT STRAUSS, Special to the Daily News
One could only approach a TV mini-series titled "Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles" with somewhat stifled ardor. But, wait, mutant ninjas, sheath your sais and nunchakus. Nary an ill word will be said here against your Zen masters. The cartoon series running, at 4 p.m. today through Thursday, and 7 a.m. tomorrow through Friday on Channel 57 has a spirit worthy of its title. "Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles" has its origin in an underground black- and-white periodic comic book of the same name.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 30, 1990 | By Carrie Rickey, Inquirer Movie Critic
From Muppets to Transformers, American moms and dads have braved the "see the movie, buy the toy" tie-in deal. But can parents survive the hard-shell hard sell? Here they come, nunchuks poised, the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles! Anyone for soup? The turtles, stars of comic books, breakfast cereals and cartoon videos, make their movie debut in a live-action feature that's unapologetically unoriginal. They are green. (The color of money.) They talk surfspeak. (Totally rad!
NEWS
August 8, 2014 | BY GARY THOMPSON, Daily News Staff Writer thompsg@phillynews.com, 215-854-5992
HOLLYWOOD, an industry notoriously starved for ideas, has become very good at repurposing old junk. Some of the brightest people in the business earn their money taking the rubbish of yesteryear, adding irony and wit, and coming up with something both nostalgia-driven and new. If you can do it with "21 Jump Street," you can do it with anything. Except maybe "Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles. " This reboot feels less like an affectionate tribute to the '80s kiddie phenomenon than a low-grade version of some stale "Transformers" sequel, and lo and behold, it's produced by Michael Bay. Bay has his purported strengths, but wit and irony are not among them.
NEWS
July 21, 2002 | By Nora Achrati INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
This may be the only place in Philadelphia where you can get hit by a flying refrigerator. It's hard to miss, the SPC Corp. scrap yard, seven acres of rusty metal and battered appliances tucked almost under the southeast corner of the Platt Memorial Bridge. Nearby a "Welcome to Philadelphia" sign, it's one of the first landmarks greeting travelers shuttling to and from Philadelphia International Airport, and it's long been blasted as one of the uglier sights along the cityscape.
NEWS
May 25, 1988 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
Nick Napoli has sold a few paper shredders in his time. He once sold a shredder to a convent. "I have no idea what they wanted it for," he said. "I didn't ask. " Now and then, the South Jersey sales representative for the Fellowes Manufacturing Co. is asked to demonstrate a paper shredder to a business that does not seem very busy. "These are places where, when you walk in, maybe two people are working, but it doesn't look like they do any business there. You have to ask yourself, what the hell do they need a shredder for?"
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 14, 2016
By Karen E. Quinones Miller Yes, I'm saying it! The cartoon featuring those green, sewer-dwelling amphibians that everyone loves is racist. Subliminally racist. Insidiously racist. I know. People are tired of folks accusing movies or television series of having racist content or undertones. Because, come on, if you look hard enough, you can convince yourself that anything can be racist. Right? But let's look at some cold hard facts here. Raphael, Donatello, Leonardo, Michelangelo - the stars of Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles: Out of the Shadows - are the good guys.
NEWS
August 8, 2014 | BY GARY THOMPSON, Daily News Staff Writer thompsg@phillynews.com, 215-854-5992
HOLLYWOOD, an industry notoriously starved for ideas, has become very good at repurposing old junk. Some of the brightest people in the business earn their money taking the rubbish of yesteryear, adding irony and wit, and coming up with something both nostalgia-driven and new. If you can do it with "21 Jump Street," you can do it with anything. Except maybe "Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles. " This reboot feels less like an affectionate tribute to the '80s kiddie phenomenon than a low-grade version of some stale "Transformers" sequel, and lo and behold, it's produced by Michael Bay. Bay has his purported strengths, but wit and irony are not among them.
NEWS
November 15, 2012
DEAR HARRY: Since last spring, two of my friends' identities were almost stolen. Fortunately, both were able to stop it from happening, and neither was hurt. However, they have been urging me to be more cautious. As a result, I went out and bought a shredder. The directions in the manufacturer's literature would have me shred everything short of our paper napkins. I figure that they exaggerate in order to get me and others to overuse the shredders. What's the real deal here, Harry?
BUSINESS
April 1, 2012 | By Linda Loyd, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Camden Iron & Metal and its heap of crushed scrap at the foot of the Platt Memorial Bridge near the airport are moving to Camden, along with 175 jobs and the promise of 50 hires. The unsightly junkyard of crushed cars and washing machines that is synonymous with 26th Street and Penrose Avenue - the gateway to Philadelphia for millions of visitors - will disappear after the scrap recycler installs, by the end of this year, a modern new shredder at Atlantic and Front Streets in Camden.
SPORTS
November 29, 2011 | By Michael Vitez, Inquirer Staff Writer
Owen Schmitt played tuba as a boy in small-town Wisconsin and loved it. But he also happened to be a football star. He couldn't score touchdowns and march with the band at halftime. So he chose touchdowns over tuba. He went to the West Virginia University, where he became a football superstar. In his last year, he didn't have many classes and began to skip the ones he had because he discovered Guitar Hero. He loved Guitar Hero. He thought to himself it would be really, really cool if he could actually play guitar.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 6, 2011 | By Howard Gensler
  B ERNIE MADOFF may have illegally made off with billions of dollars, but at an auction of Bernie's belongings at his former Palm Beach mansion, one bidder legally made off with his underwear. According to the Miami Herald , 14 pairs of boxer shorts confiscated from the former swindler - Bernie's lawyers had all the briefs - sold for a total of $200. Most of the stuff up for grabs were household items - Bernie must have had an awesome shredder - but there were also shoes, antique golf clubs and art. More than $400,000 was raised for Madoff victims - the equivalent of a microscopic organism on a drop in the bucket.
BUSINESS
August 1, 2009 | By Jane M. Von Bergen INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It was the end of the line for the red . . . maybe it was a car, or maybe a truck . . . whatever it was, swinging lifeless in the claws of the big yellow grapple at Camden Iron & Metal Inc.'s scrap yard in South Philadelphia. Yesterday, the red hulk came in on a flatbed with 20 other flattened vehicles, all the family vacations, spilled coffees, old Cheerios, lost socks, new-car smells, old-car memories squashed out of them. Soon, a huge shredder, grinding it between its tombstone-size, rust-colored teeth in a cacophony of screaming metal, would turn the red vehicle into pieces no larger than a squashed soup can. Ashes to ashes.
LIVING
September 21, 2007 | By Alan J. Heavens INQUIRER REAL ESTATE WRITER
Autumn arrives Sunday, bringing with it the perennial dilemma: what to do with all those leaves, branches and twigs nature drops on lawn and sidewalk? One solution: Turn them into mulch with a leaf shredder or wood chipper. Need to know: You can buy a shredder or a chipper or both, or a combination of the two. Which is the best for you depends on the size of your property and what falls onto it. If you own an acre with lots of trees, a gas-powered chipper/shredder may be what you need.
NEWS
October 17, 2005 | By Jennifer Lin INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Here's an export success story you don't hear very often in Philadelphia: A local business has a hot product that Chinese customers can't get enough of. The company wants to build a new plant, bring new export business to the port, and hire more than 100 employees. Good news all around, right? Only one problem: the product is scrap metal. And the company - Camden Iron & Metal Inc. - has set its sights for a new car shredder and shipping terminal on Port Richmond, a community with a very different view of its future.
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