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Shriners

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BUSINESS
December 8, 1993 | by Jenice M. Armstrong, Daily News Staff Writer
A nearly three-year-effort to woo Philadelphia's largest convention has hit another snag. The Prince Hall Shriners, whose 1995 gathering would attract about 60,000 attendees and generate $35 million, has turned down the city's proposal to host its convention here. But the Philadelphia Convention & Visitors Bureau says it still has a chance to snag the coveted meeting and will re-submit its proposal next month. "We have to go back and do some more within our hospitality community and come up with the kind of package the Shriners want," said Andrew S. Tod, the bureau's vice president of sales and marketing.
NEWS
October 1, 1989 | By Peter J. Shelly, Special to The Inquirer
The Shriners of the LuLu Temple traded in their fezzes and martinis for ten-gallon hats and cold long-necks last weekend as they welcomed a bit of the Wild West to their Blue Bell temple. Cowboy boots, complete with sharpened, shined spurs, torn blue jeans, and tired, dusty ten-gallon hats were the order of the day as the Shriners welcomed the rodeo to town. That's right, we're talkin' a good ole-fashioned foot-stompin', flag- waving, hand-clapping, dust-kickin', steer-wrasslin' weekend provided by Three Hills Rodeo, fresh out of Maquoketa, Iowa.
BUSINESS
October 12, 1994 | by Jenice M. Armstrong, Daily News Staff Writer
It would have been the largest convention ever in Philadelphia. The Prince Hall Shriners, a masonic organization, was to bring as many as 60,000 people to the Pennsylvania Convention Center for 10 days in August. The meeting would have generated $30 million. But the Shriners, a group the city had pursued vigorously to fill the $523 million center during a slow time of year, aren't coming. Local tourism officials had been fearing the worst for months. "The Shriners will meet in Indianapolis in '95," said Ralph Slaughter, who heads a committee of the Detroit-based group charged to determine where the organization would meet.
NEWS
April 23, 1989 | By Lynn Hamilton, Special to The Inquirer
Robert James Spence Sr., 66, a plumbing contractor who helped raise money for crippled children, died Monday at Lankenau Hospital. Mr. Spence lived in Havertown for 15 years and had lived in Drexel Hill. Before his retirement in 1984, Mr. Spence worked for almost 40 years as a plumbing contractor in the family business, George E. Spence & Sons Co. Inc., which was started by his father. Mr. Spence was a Mason for 40 years. He was a member of the Shriners and for many years was active in fund-raising for Shriners Hospital For Crippled Children in Philadelphia.
NEWS
October 11, 1993
From his Idaho vantage point, Robert Turnipseed is flummoxed. He heads the Shriners committee that wants to move the Shriners' aging hospital for crippled children. The old, stone facility has served nobly on Roosevelt Boulevard, repairing the ravages of polio and then spine disease and other orthopedic cripplers - all free of charge. That the hospital needs to be replaced is not in dispute. It's a relic of the 1920s. But what has dismayed Mr. Turnipseed - and startled some of the city's longest-term economic development chiefs - is the intensity of the bare-knuckles brawl that has flared since the Shriners said they would like to relocate their free service in the city's neediest neighborhood - in Temple University's brand new medical center on North Broad Street.
NEWS
June 29, 2004 | By Terry Bitman INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Richard and Dawn Lavinthal sashay past each other on the large floor, in perfect unison with 30 other couples switching spots as they line dance to the strains of '60s-era Motown. They have followed the two good-humored South Jersey disc jockeys known as Lou Costello and Billy from Philly to a new home in another state, about 35 miles from where home used to be. Exactly 52 weeks ago, the Lavinthals and about 300 other baby-boomer regulars at the DJs' monthly soirees thought they might be dancing their last dance.
NEWS
February 27, 2013 | By Helen Ubinas, Daily News Columnist
MOHAMMED Al-Jumaili is an all-American teenager by way of war-torn Fallujah, Iraq. The cheerful, focused 18-year-old keeps mounds of Boy Scout awards in his bedroom dresser and prosthetic limbs in his closet. "I used to have more," he explained as he struggled to dig the prosthetics out the other day in the Glenside apartment he shares with his mother. He found three. Two were his, plastic legs of varying quality that replaced a right leg that was half blown off from a car-bomb explosion when he was 12. Another was an arm that looked as though it was removed from a slightly oversize doll.
NEWS
February 22, 2009 | By Walter F. Naedele INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
John Wesley Dean III, 80, the fourth-generation owner of a Philadelphia funeral home, a lawyer, and a nationally prominent Shriner, died of Parkinson's disease Feb. 12 at his home in Largo, Fla. His daughter, Katharine Mervine, said the original firm, John W. Dean Funeral Director, was founded in 1883 in Fox Chase. Dean's son, Warren, was followed by John W. Dean Jr. and then Mrs. Mervine's father. In the mid-1980s, she said, the firm, still in Fox Chase, was sold and now operates as Dean Geitner Givnish Funeral Homes.
NEWS
October 3, 1986 | By Michael Capuzzo, Inquirer Staff Writer (Contributing to this article were the Associated Press, United Press International, Reuters, USA Today and the Washington Post.)
Happy coincidence! The 15th anniversary of Walt Disney World in Florida and the 200th anniversary of the U.S. Constitution are converging, more or less, so former Chief Justice Warren E. Burger will be at the Orlando, Fla., fantasy land today to officially kick off the constitutional celebration with a keynote address (the Constitution's birthday is Sept. 17). When Burger appears for Constitution ceremonies in Philadelphia next year, remember that it all began yesterday at Dulles Airport in Washington, with Snow White and one of her favorite dwarfs seeing the ex-jurist off to Florida.
NEWS
June 14, 1989
GANG STRIFE CONTINUING How any parents can accept the death of their son and not feel any bitterness toward his executioners is hard for me to comprehend. Such a loss has to be devastating. Seventeen years old - what a pity, what a loss! If the Daily family and the authorities think not having retaliation will stop these street beatings and killings, they have another guess coming. There is still the responsible one that gang is set to get. After the arrest and trial of these criminals, the sad part of this story starts.
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NEWS
February 27, 2014 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
  Robert W. Donnahoo Jr. in the late 1990s and early 2000s was a member of the board of governors of Shriners Hospitals for Children-Philadelphia. "He would come home and be crazy about the hospital," crazy happy, his wife, Penny, said in a phone interview. "He would be there and a little kid would come up to him, tug his coattail and say, 'I'm going to get a new leg today.' " And the next time that they would meet, his wife said, the child would say to him, "I got my new leg. How does it look?"
NEWS
February 27, 2013 | By Helen Ubinas, Daily News Columnist
MOHAMMED Al-Jumaili is an all-American teenager by way of war-torn Fallujah, Iraq. The cheerful, focused 18-year-old keeps mounds of Boy Scout awards in his bedroom dresser and prosthetic limbs in his closet. "I used to have more," he explained as he struggled to dig the prosthetics out the other day in the Glenside apartment he shares with his mother. He found three. Two were his, plastic legs of varying quality that replaced a right leg that was half blown off from a car-bomb explosion when he was 12. Another was an arm that looked as though it was removed from a slightly oversize doll.
NEWS
May 20, 2010 | By Michael Matza INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Eight-year-old Sarah Maurice, who lost a leg to Haiti's earthquake, had just one question for doctors Wednesday at Shriners Hospital for Children in Philadelphia. When the technicians finish building her artificial limb, will it be the color of her chocolate-brown skin? Prosthetist Jennifer Stieber assured her it would. Sarah, an irrepressible elf in a blue-striped dress and a single brown sandal, mostly laid her crutches aside to hop about the hospital on her sound left leg during a morning of medical evaluation.
NEWS
May 20, 2010 | By Michael Matza, Inquirer Staff Writer
Eight-year-old Sarah Maurice, who lost a leg to Haiti's earthquake, had just one question for doctors Wednesday at Shriners Hospital for Children in Philadelphia. When the technicians finish building her artificial limb, will it be the color of her chocolate-brown skin? Prosthetist Jennifer Stieber assured her it would. Sarah, an irrepressible elf in a blue-striped dress and a single brown sandal, mostly laid her crutches aside to hop about the hospital on her sound left leg during a morning of medical evaluation.
NEWS
April 11, 2010 | By Wyclef Jean
It's been three months since the earthquake on Jan. 12 pounded Haiti, the country where I was born. People are starting to rebuild, but the quake left 1.3 million people homeless and 300,000 injured. It will take months to feed all the hungry and shelter the homeless. And that's just the beginning. In a country of nine million, about 230,000 died. Everyone knows someone who died. I had friends who died. Everyone there has a hole in his heart. Of the many emergency situations in Haiti right now, one of the biggest is helping the 200,000 people who have lost limbs in the aftermath of the quake.
NEWS
February 22, 2009 | By Walter F. Naedele INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
John Wesley Dean III, 80, the fourth-generation owner of a Philadelphia funeral home, a lawyer, and a nationally prominent Shriner, died of Parkinson's disease Feb. 12 at his home in Largo, Fla. His daughter, Katharine Mervine, said the original firm, John W. Dean Funeral Director, was founded in 1883 in Fox Chase. Dean's son, Warren, was followed by John W. Dean Jr. and then Mrs. Mervine's father. In the mid-1980s, she said, the firm, still in Fox Chase, was sold and now operates as Dean Geitner Givnish Funeral Homes.
BUSINESS
November 4, 2007 | By Stacey Burling INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
If you gave your work away, would you advertise for more customers? That's what the Shriners Hospitals for Children are doing this month as they begin their first marketing campaign since their founding in 1922. The $14-million-a-year advertising effort - meant to attract patients and, more obviously, donations - is a sign of how much society and medical care have changed since the Shriners entered the hospital business. Membership in the fraternal organization - known for the archaic red hats, fezzes, its members wear - has dwindled.
NEWS
September 29, 2005 | By Bonnie L. Cook INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A little-known Pennsylvania law that makes it illegal to transport horses in double-decker trailers has lassoed a crew of Iowa cowboys trucking rodeo animals into Montgomery County for a Shriners fund-raiser. Now, the cowboys are due in court. Acting on a tip, Whitemarsh Township police pulled over two double-decker tractor trailers carrying steers and horses on Sept. 18. The cowboys, who had just completed a fund-raising rodeo at the Shriners LuLu Temple in Plymouth Meeting, were accused of transporting the horses in a cruel manner.
NEWS
May 26, 2005 | By George Anastasia INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Legendary radio talk-show host Mary Mason, public-relations guru R. Bruce Crawley, and the imperial potentate of the African American Shriners headed a parade of character witnesses who testified yesterday at the racketeering trial of Imam Shamsud-din Ali. Mason, who hugged Ali after she completed her brief stint on the witness stand in U.S. District Court, said the imam had "an impeccable reputation in the community. " And while she said she was aware of the charges leveled against him from reading media accounts of the case, she quickly added: "I don't believe everything I read in the newspapers.
NEWS
June 29, 2004 | By Terry Bitman INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Richard and Dawn Lavinthal sashay past each other on the large floor, in perfect unison with 30 other couples switching spots as they line dance to the strains of '60s-era Motown. They have followed the two good-humored South Jersey disc jockeys known as Lou Costello and Billy from Philly to a new home in another state, about 35 miles from where home used to be. Exactly 52 weeks ago, the Lavinthals and about 300 other baby-boomer regulars at the DJs' monthly soirees thought they might be dancing their last dance.
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