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SPORTS
December 5, 1995 | by Bill Fleischman, Daily News Sports Writer
Sports fans eager to know who Sports Illustrated's Sportsman of the Year is before reading it in next week's issue can watch a prime-time special Sunday (Channel 29, 7 p.m.). That's right: An SI television show will scoop the magazine, which won't be available until Dec. 13. SI managing editor Mark Mulvoy is not happy about that, but is playing the loyal corporate suit. "As editors," Mulvoy said yesterday, "we prefer the television show to follow the magazine. But the decision has been made.
NEWS
March 5, 2003
IN Michael Smerconish's column (Feb. 27), he states that barrier was broken during the Grammys when a commercial was aired about Crest toothpaste in Spanish. He seems to be kind of shaken, but seeing it from a Hispanic's eyes, I'm very proud. I won't call Mr. Smerconish Archie Bunker because Archie made me laugh. Michael's statements sadden me. For years, Hispanics have had limited representation in commercials. Now, all of a sudden, Procter & Gamble airs a commercial with a few Spanish words, and our favorite columnist is all shook up. The Hispanic people love the English language and those who do not speak it make an effort to learn it. By learning this golden language, they can get ahead in life economically and socially.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 7, 2013
LET'S FACE IT, the real question here is: Does Rocky's cheesesteak live up to the high standards we natives set for this most Philadelphian of delicacies? The answer, in short, is no. The combination of machine-processed cheese and mayonnaise glopped onto the steak is distinctly un-Philadelphian. (Argentines have a love affair with mayo, so its presence here is not surprising.) These ingredients create a topping you'd be more likely to get at a bar in Davenport, Iowa, or Omaha, Neb., than on a steak from an authentic joint in the City of Brotherly Love.
NEWS
June 8, 2003 | By Donna Bleznak Keller FOR THE INQUIRER
It was the beginning of our lives together and already we were on each other's nerves. There we were, humping along a Costa Rican road in a taxi the size of a coffee can, wishing we had learned to speak Spanish. Whose idea was it to honeymoon in Costa Rica anyway? (Answer: his.) Our plan was to spend one night in the capital, San Jose, pick up our rental car, and set out the next morning for Tamarindo, a beach town about three hours away. Although he knew about the country's notoriously bad roads, my new husband had decided we should drive to the beach; to fly would mean telling his new wife that in-country flights enforced an impossible 40-pound weight limit on luggage.
SPORTS
December 12, 1997 | by Bill Fleischman, Daily News Sports Writer
Anniversaries are occasions to celebrate. People at CNN/SI won't be drenched in champagne showers today, but they feel their first-year mission has been accomplished. CNN/SI, a co-venture of the cable news network and Sports Illustrated magazine, launched a year ago. Unlike ESPN and Fox Sports Net, CNN/SI does not carry games. CNN/SI's programming is strictly information: covering breaking news, analysis and features. The major problem for CNN/SI, as for most new cable networks, is distribution.
SPORTS
April 29, 1997 | Daily News Wire Services
Titleist has pulled more than $1 million in advertising from Sports Illustrated over its coverage of the lesbian party scene at the Dinah Shore tournament. The story on the tournament - a longtime chic vacation place for lesbians - was a feature accompanying the magazine's regular coverage of the tournament. The piece was illustrated with a photo of a woman in a thong bikini locked in embrace with another woman and another picture of a gathering place at which women were apparently watching a female exotic dancer.
NEWS
February 23, 1993 | By LARRY PLATT
Last week, I took my copy of Sports Illustrated's infamous swimsuit issue into my office. Within minutes, three male co-workers were gathered around my desk to inspect the pictorial. No disparaging or offensive comments were made, but I was struck at the issue's ability to draw a crowd. But then, the swimsuit issue has been drawing a crowd for 29 years. According to the magazine's public relations department, the issue will be viewed by 41 million Americans, almost double SI's average weekly audience.
NEWS
July 19, 2011
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NEWS
February 22, 2003
Two of America's most familiar magazines shed a pretense this month. In doing so, they met in the middle - or shall we say, midriff. Sports Illustrated issued its famous swimsuit issue, that annual midwinter cavalcade of bared beauty, strained poses, unwearable fashions, and arch prose that stuffs AOL-Time Warner's needy coffers and boggles adolescent brains. No surprise there. More impressive was columnist Rick Reilly's tongue-in-cheek admission on the back page that SI has just about run out of journalistic veneer to slap onto this profitable exercise in ogling.
SPORTS
August 31, 2015 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, Inquirer Columnist
Recently, casually lifting a Sports Illustrated out of a magazine rack in a physician's waiting room, I nearly had a heart attack. Fortunately, it was my cardiologist's office. I don't know how long it had been since I last held a copy of the magazine I'd grown up adoring, but this one was frighteningly emaciated, a slight and insubstantial version of its once-robust self. Even the frail old men surrounding me seemed healthier. Time - both the passing years and the magazine's parent company - clearly had not been kind to SI. The issues I eagerly consumed as a boy used to have a tangible heft.
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SPORTS
August 31, 2015 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, Inquirer Columnist
Recently, casually lifting a Sports Illustrated out of a magazine rack in a physician's waiting room, I nearly had a heart attack. Fortunately, it was my cardiologist's office. I don't know how long it had been since I last held a copy of the magazine I'd grown up adoring, but this one was frighteningly emaciated, a slight and insubstantial version of its once-robust self. Even the frail old men surrounding me seemed healthier. Time - both the passing years and the magazine's parent company - clearly had not been kind to SI. The issues I eagerly consumed as a boy used to have a tangible heft.
NEWS
August 16, 2014 | By Joseph A. Gambardello, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Archdiocese of Philadelphia was forced to respond again Thursday to a reported off-the-cuff remark indicating that Pope Francis will come to Philadelphia for the World Meeting of Families in September 2015. This time, the speaker was the pope himself, answering a question about whether he would attend the international gathering. "In Italian, I asked him if he would come to Philadelphia," NBC reporter Anne Thompson said of the question she asked the pontiff on the papal plane to South Korea.
NEWS
March 10, 2014
Despite substantial revisions to a psychedelic redistricting plan rejected by Pennsylvania's highest court, State Rep. Ed Neilson's Northeast Philadelphia district is still being jettisoned to York County. That stranded the lawmaker in fellow Rep. John Sabatina Jr.'s turf, and it left Philadelphia Democrats with two incumbents poised to do battle for the same seat in something called a competitive election. The horror! Not to worry: Party bosses have hatched a scheme to head off the unthinkable prospect of giving voters a choice.
NEWS
March 7, 2014 | By Elizabeth Wellington, Inquirer Fashion Writer
This year's Sports Illustrated swimsuit issue features a real Philly girl next door. Doylestown's Samantha Hoopes is one of 12 rookies - meaning, new to the SI swimsuit scene - in the issue's 50th anniversary edition. "People actually know my name now," Hoopes, 23, said in a telephone interview while on a Malibu Beach in between taking pictures for the Latin version of Esquire magazine. "It's all been very unreal. " In the sure-to-be-a-collectors-item issue, Hoopes tapped her inner temptress in a breast-baring black one-piece bathing suit, a one-shouldered version of the white fishnet suit worn in the 1978 issue by Cheryl Tiegs (also featured in the "Legends" portion of this issue)
SPORTS
December 13, 2013 | BY JOHN MURROW, Daily News Staff Writer murrowj@phillynews.com
MICHAEL JORDAN was on the cover of Sports Illustrated an even 50 times during his decorated NBA career. Boxing legend Muhammad Ali's image was displayed 38 times. Yet, both went on to finish their careers at the top of their respective sports, never once worrying about "the jinx. " With Nick Foles joining the list of SI cover boys this week, the laid-back, calm and collected quarterback believes there really is not much to the jinx, other than the fact that he will be on newsstands around the Northeast, with the Auburn Tigers making SI 's national cover.
NEWS
September 6, 2013 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Dancing With the Stars has announced its cast for its new season, and, as usual, many are the surprises. Example: Bill Nye the Science Guy will wax terpsichorean with Tyne Stecklein ; Nicole "Snooki" Polizzi of Jersey Shore will sashay with Sasha Farber . And amazing Valerie Harper , whose brain cancer, once thought terminal, is said to be in some kind of abeyance, will trip it with Tristan MacManus . Wow. Other pairings:...
ENTERTAINMENT
March 7, 2013
LET'S FACE IT, the real question here is: Does Rocky's cheesesteak live up to the high standards we natives set for this most Philadelphian of delicacies? The answer, in short, is no. The combination of machine-processed cheese and mayonnaise glopped onto the steak is distinctly un-Philadelphian. (Argentines have a love affair with mayo, so its presence here is not surprising.) These ingredients create a topping you'd be more likely to get at a bar in Davenport, Iowa, or Omaha, Neb., than on a steak from an authentic joint in the City of Brotherly Love.
NEWS
September 23, 2012 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Dr. Si-Chun Ming, 89, of Bryn Mawr, a pathology professor at Temple University School of Medicine from 1971 to 1992, died Tuesday, Sept. 18, of complications from a stroke at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania. Dr. Ming was acting chairman of the pathology department at Temple from 1978 to 1980. Temple honored him in 2003 by placing his portrait on permanent display in the main corridor of its hospital, at the same time it gave that honor to his wife, Pen-Ming Lee Ming, a professor of pathology and obstetrics-gynecology there.
SPORTS
December 6, 2011 | STAFF AND WIRE REPORTS
COLLEGE basketball coaches Pat Summitt (Tennessee women) and Mike Krzyzewski (Duke men) were selected yesterday as Sports Illustrated's sportswoman and sportsman of the year. Summitt, who announced in August she had been diagnosed with early onset dementia, earned her 1,075th career victory Sunday. Krzyzewski passed Bob Knight as winningest men's coach on Nov. 15. In other college news: * Quarterbacks Robert Griffin III (Baylor) and Andrew Luck (Stanford)
NEWS
November 13, 2011 | By Al Haas, For The Inquirer
And now, by the authority vested in me by no one in particular, I pronounce the Civic Si the most fun you can have in a Honda. Until the performance-minded Si was redesigned for the 2012 model year, I would have placed this compact's fun quotient a tad below its midsize corporate kin, the Accord V-6 coupe with the manual gearbox. The Accord, after all, extracted 271 horsepower from its 3.5-liter V-6. The Civic got 197 from a 2-liter four. The Accord's 74-horse edge translated into a lot more green-light gumption.
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