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Siamese

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NEWS
August 18, 1993 | by Edward Moran, Daily News Staff Writer
Reitha and Ken Lakeberg decided months ago that the possibility that one of their infant Siamese twins could be saved was better than aborting both. Yesterday, the task of making the young Indiana couple's decision prove worth the heartache was passed to doctors at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia. The life-and-death decision the parents and doctors now face will depend on whether the organs the twins share have a chance to keep at least one of them alive. Angela and Amy Lakeberg, born seven weeks ago, are joined at the chest and share a heart and a liver.
NEWS
May 16, 2002 | Written by staff writer Dan D. Wiggs based on truth, justice, the American way and Daily News wire services. Send insults to dwiggs@phillynews.com
Catastrophe You've heard the song. "We are Siamese if you please. We are Siamese if you don't please. " Perfect example of that cattiness occurred this week in Dartmouth, Nova Scotia. A family's pet Siamese went on a rampage and chased the entire clan from its home. The cat had earlier attacked a baby sitter. The family called police, who needed a blanket, clothes hamper and 20 minutes to subdue the fiend. Cocoa (that being the cat's name) was taken to the vet, and from there . . . do all cats go to heaven?
NEWS
July 12, 2013
Cat Circus So what if the Belieber Nation is taking over town? Everybody knows there's nothing like a guitar-playing cat, a skateboarding cat and a cat acrobat to showcase true talent. Samantha Martin's talented feline troupe is, amazingly, just your run-of-the-mill tabbies and such. Still, they've wowed the world via YouTube and are playing to sellout crowds in Old City. Note: Yesterday's planned visit to Philly was cancelled because of tour bus troubles. They should never have let the Siamese drive.
NEWS
February 4, 1988 | By RON AVERY, Daily News Staff Writer
He has scientifically studied fish in tanks, lions at the zoo, riders on the Broad Street Subway and students in his own lectures. At this point, Dr. Ronald Baenninger can authoritatively report that they all yawn - probably for the same reason. Sadly, the informal five-year study clearly demonstrates that Temple University math students out-yawn fish, lions, mandrills (baboons), subway riders and cafeteria diners by a wide margin - a very wide margin. Well, that's not important.
NEWS
June 14, 1995 | by RON AVERY, Daily News Staff Writer
Today's Poor Ronald's Almanac considers two interesting but totally unrelated Philadelphia tales. FOUND IN THE DUNGEON: Eastern State Penitentiary in Fairmount was abandoned 20 years ago, and most everything of value was removed. Still, fascinating artifacts keep surfacing at the grim national landmark. Found recently in an area where the roof partially collapsed was a classic prison "shank. " The homemade knife is a sharpened piece of metal with a handle made of black tape.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 12, 1986 | By SUSAN STEWART, Daily News Staff Writer
Before air time, it was impossible to begin to figure out Richard Bey. The host of Channel 3's morning show, "People Are Talking," was in his high energy mode, dashing in and out of the "private and secure" dressing room that was part of his last contract, which raised him from $60,000 a year to a "fair" amount, privately applying Clinique blush in shades of Fig and Extra Rose, hitching up the pants that are two sizes too big for him at his present weight,...
ENTERTAINMENT
September 24, 2011 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Movie Critic
Harry Eastlack, whose tissue turned to bone, lives again. So, too, do Chang and Eng Bunker, the Siamese twins who fathered 21 children between them. And Chenallier, a 19th-century French basket-maker whose tumor was so large it resembled a giant pillow - all have been returned to life, in a manner of speaking, in "Through the Weeping Glass: On the Consolations of Life Everlasting (Limbos & Afterbreezes in the Mütter Museum). " This cinematic celebration of the "cruel beauty" of the vast collection of objects housed at the Mütter had its world premiere Thursday evening, as several hundred guests were treated to Stephen and Timothy Quay's unique take on the museum's trove of medical oddities and marvelous, albeit morbid, artifacts.
NEWS
August 2, 1992 | By Jennifer Reid Holman, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Patricia Chico had hoped the day would never come. But the sadness in her dog's faithful, yellowing eyes and the pain that contorted its body told her it was time to put her dear companion to sleep. It was the hardest decision she ever made, Chico said. And the loss of a pet she had owned for more than 14 years sent her into a severe depression. She also felt angry and alienated because few people expressed sympathy for her loss, or understood why she could not seem to cheer up. Chico found some comfort, however, when she decided to attend a local support group.
NEWS
March 25, 2011 | By TED SILARY, silaryt@phillynews.com
UNIVERSITY PARK - Thomas Moore took a few steps back, pounded his chest three, four, five times while backing away at the edge of the court, then stormed forward to accept two things from coach Danny Jackson - a powerful hug and a gold medal. Standing right nearby, having just accepted his special prize, was another senior and starting member of Math, Civics & Sciences Charter's basketball team, Warren Dogan. It was a shame the lanyard wasn't a little bigger. Jackson could have grouped his co-point guards and awarded them one gold medal to share.
SPORTS
December 28, 1988 | By Ted Silary, Daily News Sports Writer
Jason and Carlin Warley, it has been decreed, are more than brothers where basketball is concerned. They are Siamese twins. Last night, after the Warleys helped Frankford make a bid for national recognition by overtiming St. Nicholas of Tolentine (Bronx, N.Y.), 78-74, in a crowd-titillating Seagull Classic XV semifinal at St. Joseph's University, their father made an announcement that also might have countrywide implications. "If you don't want one," said Ben Warley, a former 76er, "you don't get the other.
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NEWS
July 12, 2013
Cat Circus So what if the Belieber Nation is taking over town? Everybody knows there's nothing like a guitar-playing cat, a skateboarding cat and a cat acrobat to showcase true talent. Samantha Martin's talented feline troupe is, amazingly, just your run-of-the-mill tabbies and such. Still, they've wowed the world via YouTube and are playing to sellout crowds in Old City. Note: Yesterday's planned visit to Philly was cancelled because of tour bus troubles. They should never have let the Siamese drive.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 24, 2011 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Movie Critic
Harry Eastlack, whose tissue turned to bone, lives again. So, too, do Chang and Eng Bunker, the Siamese twins who fathered 21 children between them. And Chenallier, a 19th-century French basket-maker whose tumor was so large it resembled a giant pillow - all have been returned to life, in a manner of speaking, in "Through the Weeping Glass: On the Consolations of Life Everlasting (Limbos & Afterbreezes in the Mütter Museum). " This cinematic celebration of the "cruel beauty" of the vast collection of objects housed at the Mütter had its world premiere Thursday evening, as several hundred guests were treated to Stephen and Timothy Quay's unique take on the museum's trove of medical oddities and marvelous, albeit morbid, artifacts.
NEWS
March 25, 2011 | By TED SILARY, silaryt@phillynews.com
UNIVERSITY PARK - Thomas Moore took a few steps back, pounded his chest three, four, five times while backing away at the edge of the court, then stormed forward to accept two things from coach Danny Jackson - a powerful hug and a gold medal. Standing right nearby, having just accepted his special prize, was another senior and starting member of Math, Civics & Sciences Charter's basketball team, Warren Dogan. It was a shame the lanyard wasn't a little bigger. Jackson could have grouped his co-point guards and awarded them one gold medal to share.
NEWS
May 16, 2002 | Written by staff writer Dan D. Wiggs based on truth, justice, the American way and Daily News wire services. Send insults to dwiggs@phillynews.com
Catastrophe You've heard the song. "We are Siamese if you please. We are Siamese if you don't please. " Perfect example of that cattiness occurred this week in Dartmouth, Nova Scotia. A family's pet Siamese went on a rampage and chased the entire clan from its home. The cat had earlier attacked a baby sitter. The family called police, who needed a blanket, clothes hamper and 20 minutes to subdue the fiend. Cocoa (that being the cat's name) was taken to the vet, and from there . . . do all cats go to heaven?
NEWS
June 14, 1995 | by RON AVERY, Daily News Staff Writer
Today's Poor Ronald's Almanac considers two interesting but totally unrelated Philadelphia tales. FOUND IN THE DUNGEON: Eastern State Penitentiary in Fairmount was abandoned 20 years ago, and most everything of value was removed. Still, fascinating artifacts keep surfacing at the grim national landmark. Found recently in an area where the roof partially collapsed was a classic prison "shank. " The homemade knife is a sharpened piece of metal with a handle made of black tape.
NEWS
October 16, 1993 | by Barbara Laker, Daily News Staff Writer The Associated Press contributed to this report
Kenneth Lakeberg, who was on the lam for several hours yesterday, finally turned himself in to authorities last night and was promptly put in jail. Lakeberg, the 26-year-old father of the conjoined twins recently separated at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, had been scheduled to appear in an Indiana courtroom yesterday to answer charges that he violated probation by using drugs and alcohol. But Lakeberg, of Wheatfield, Ind., surprised authorities by not showing up. Newton Superior Court Judge Daniel Molter issued a warrant for Lakeberg's arrest and revoked his probation.
NEWS
September 4, 1993 | by Barbara Laker, Daily News Staff Writer The Associated Press contributed to this report
When Kenneth Lakeberg walked into a packed Indiana courthouse yesterday clad in shorts and a T-shirt, it was as if he were a star. Reporters shoved microphones under his nose; the questions came in rapid fire. Talk of movie contracts. Big money. "He made Burt Reynolds look like a rookie," Newton Superior Court Judge Daniel Molter said with a laugh in a phone interview yesterday after the hearing. But as he left the courthouse, Lakeberg quickly went from star to bit actor when a relative, still angry over a fight last Christmas in which Lakeberg wounded a cousin with a knife, yelled, "You're nothing but scum.
NEWS
August 18, 1993 | by Edward Moran, Daily News Staff Writer
Reitha and Ken Lakeberg decided months ago that the possibility that one of their infant Siamese twins could be saved was better than aborting both. Yesterday, the task of making the young Indiana couple's decision prove worth the heartache was passed to doctors at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia. The life-and-death decision the parents and doctors now face will depend on whether the organs the twins share have a chance to keep at least one of them alive. Angela and Amy Lakeberg, born seven weeks ago, are joined at the chest and share a heart and a liver.
NEWS
August 2, 1992 | By Jennifer Reid Holman, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Patricia Chico had hoped the day would never come. But the sadness in her dog's faithful, yellowing eyes and the pain that contorted its body told her it was time to put her dear companion to sleep. It was the hardest decision she ever made, Chico said. And the loss of a pet she had owned for more than 14 years sent her into a severe depression. She also felt angry and alienated because few people expressed sympathy for her loss, or understood why she could not seem to cheer up. Chico found some comfort, however, when she decided to attend a local support group.
FOOD
May 17, 1992 | By Elaine Tait, INQUIRER RESTAURANT CRITIC
It's difficult to count a restaurant's chairs without attracting attention - and that's the last thing a reviewer wants to do - so I'm not absolutely certain that I got the exact count of those packed into the Siamese Princess' single, small dining room. What I can say, without fear of contradiction, is that crowding roughly 36 in this pretty little restaurant makes it almost essential to love your neighbors. The Princess, a new-style Thai restaurant with printed cloths on the tables and interesting art on the walls, arrived on Manayunk's Main Street late in 1991 and quickly found a following.
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