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NEWS
November 1, 2015 | By Craig LaBan, Inquirer Restaurant Critic
It can be a risky proposition to name a restaurant after a single dish. Because that dish had better be good. And so on cue, as though to illustrate the pitfalls of the proverb, the stylish new Chinese restaurant called DanDan serves a version of its namesake noodle dish that is decidedly . . . so-so. What's frustrating is that DanDan, in so many other ways, is a welcome dose of authentic Sichuan and Taiwanese flavors near Rittenhouse Square, with a sharp contemporary space, ambitious owners, and the potential to become an adventurous new favorite in a posh zip code that can always benefit from a little more earthy spice.
NEWS
April 22, 2013 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
LUSHAN, China - Luo Shiqiang sat near chunks of concrete, bricks and a ripped orange sofa and told how his grandfather was just returning from feeding chickens when their house collapsed and crushed him to death in this weekend's powerful earthquake in southwestern China. "We lost everything in such a short time," the 20-year-old said Sunday. He said that his cousin also was injured in the collapse, but that other members of his family were spared because they were out working in the fields of hard-hit Longmen village in Lushan county.
NEWS
April 23, 2013 | By Gillian Wong, Associated Press
YA'AN, China - Rescuers and relief teams struggled to rush supplies into the rural hills of China's Sichuan province Sunday after an earthquake left at least 180 people dead and more than 11,000 injured and prompted frightened survivors to spend a night in cars, tents, and makeshift shelters. The earthquake Saturday morning triggered landslides that cut off roads and disrupted phone and power connections in mountainous Lushan county, in Sichuan's Ya'an city area, which is farther south on the same fault line where a devastating quake wreaked widespread damage five years ago. Hardest hit were villages farther up the valleys, where farmers grow rice and vegetables on terraced plots.
FOOD
February 3, 2005 | By Marilynn Marter INQUIRER FOOD WRITER
When the dinner gong sounds on Tuesday at the Chinese Cultural and Community Center in Chinatown, it will mark not just the eve of the new year, the Year of the Rooster, 4703 on the lunar calendar, but also the center's 50th anniversary and the renewal of a New Year's banquet tradition that started here in 1960 at a dinner honoring author Pearl S. Buck. The banquets, on hold since the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks curtailed efforts to bring guest chefs here from China, are back on track.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 8, 2010 | By Carrie Rickey, Inquirer Movie Critic
Last Train Home , Lixin Fan's compelling documentary portrait of the human sacrifice behind China's economic miracle, begins with a startling statistic. At Chinese New Year, 130 million migrant workers journey from factories in industrial cities to make their way back to rural villages and towns for an annual visit. It is the world's largest human migration, unfathomable in scope, engorging trains, buses, and boats to the degree that America's Thanksgiving commute looks like an easy hop. The jostle and bustle is not the point of Fan's emotionally involving film, which is to show the enormous gulf between the workers and the families left behind, the collateral damage of industrialization.
NEWS
August 11, 1995 | By Robert Moran, INQUIRER HARRISBURG BUREAU
A pesky bug - the six-legged hemlock woolly adelgid - is sucking the life out of thousands of hemlock trees in Pennsylvania. "The adelgid sucks the sap out of the twigs," said E. Michael Blumenthal, a forest entomologist with the state Department of Conservation and Natural Resources. "It causes the needles to turn yellow and fall off," which causes the trees to wither. Eventually, the trees can die. So what's a state entomologist to do? Go to China. Blumenthal and a researcher with the U.S. Forest Service recently journeyed to the remote Chinese province of Sichuan, just east of Tibet, and up into mountains near the Himalayas as part of a federal scientific exchange program.
NEWS
April 23, 2013 | By Gillian Wong, Associated Press
LUSHAN, China - The tent village that sprang up in two days to house quake survivors in mountain-flanked Lushan is no ordinary refugee camp. China's full range of disaster response is on display: Trucks with X-ray equipment, phone-charging stations, bank tellers-on-wheels - even a tent for insurance claims. The efforts under way Monday in mountainous Sichuan province after a quake Saturday that killed at least 188 people showed that the government has continued to hone its disaster reaction - long considered a crucial leadership test in China - since a much more devastating earthquake in 2008, also in Sichuan, and another one in 2010 in the western region of Yushu.
NEWS
June 4, 2008 | By Trudy Rubin
Every day when I sit down at my desk, I look straight at the Tankman. The Tankman is the unbelievably brave Chinese man who stood before a line of tanks near Tiananmen Square in Beijing, as the Chinese government moved to crush pro-democracy demonstrators in June 1989. An estimated 2,000 unarmed people were killed. The Tankman - whose fate isn't known - was immortalized in a famous black and white photo. It hangs, as a poster, on my office wall. This week marks the 19th anniversary of the Tiananmen massacres.
NEWS
October 20, 1994 | By Thomas J. Brady, with reports from Inquirer wire services
EXTRA! EXTRA! NEWSSTAND OPERATOR HELPS SAVE THE DAY Newsstand operator Richard Stanger got involved with a breaking story Tuesday and got his mug on Page One yesterday. Seems he and another New Yorker threw themselves against a bank door and trapped a stabbing suspect in the lobby. It all happened near Bloomingdale's on New York's Upper East Side, one of the Big Apple's safest areas. An assortment of other people also comported themselves heroically in the incident.
SPORTS
August 9, 2008 | Daily News Wire Services
China didn't just walk onto the world stage, it soared over it. In its long-awaited role as Olympic host, China opened the Summer Games in spectacular fashion yesterday with an extravaganza of fireworks and pageantry dramatizing its ascendance as a global power. Disasters, environmental problems and human-rights disputes preceded the games, but for one evening, at least for the 91,000 people packed into the National Stadium, it was an interlude of fervor and magic, capped by the spellbinding sight of a skywalking, torchbearing gymnast floating around the stadium's top rim before sending a torrent of fire upward to light the Olympic flame.
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FOOD
June 16, 2016
Makes 4 servings 11/2 pounds tuna steak, cut into small chunks 1 tablespoon red miso paste 1/2 teaspoon prepared wasabi 1 teaspoon soy sauce 4 green onions, white and pale green parts, cut into 1/2-inch pieces For pickled ginger relish: 1/2 cup pickled ginger for sushi, finely chopped Finely chopped zest and juice of 1/2 lemon 3 green onions, white and pale green parts, halved lengthwise and thinly sliced ...
NEWS
November 1, 2015 | By Craig LaBan, Inquirer Restaurant Critic
It can be a risky proposition to name a restaurant after a single dish. Because that dish had better be good. And so on cue, as though to illustrate the pitfalls of the proverb, the stylish new Chinese restaurant called DanDan serves a version of its namesake noodle dish that is decidedly . . . so-so. What's frustrating is that DanDan, in so many other ways, is a welcome dose of authentic Sichuan and Taiwanese flavors near Rittenhouse Square, with a sharp contemporary space, ambitious owners, and the potential to become an adventurous new favorite in a posh zip code that can always benefit from a little more earthy spice.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 16, 2014 | By Rick Nichols, For The Inquirer
One recent morning, Susanna Foo could be found, bundled in a quilted jacket, picking out boxes of butternut squash, cauliflower, and sweet potatoes at the chilly wholesale produce market in Southwest Philadelphia. The weekly shopping dates to her days on Walnut Street, when for 25 years her eponymous restaurant was the toast of the town. She'd pioneered a new cuisine, a blend of Chinese sensibility and French technique. And even after decamping five years ago to a cafe in suburban Radnor, she remains picky about her vegetables.
NEWS
April 23, 2013 | By Gillian Wong, Associated Press
LUSHAN, China - The tent village that sprang up in two days to house quake survivors in mountain-flanked Lushan is no ordinary refugee camp. China's full range of disaster response is on display: Trucks with X-ray equipment, phone-charging stations, bank tellers-on-wheels - even a tent for insurance claims. The efforts under way Monday in mountainous Sichuan province after a quake Saturday that killed at least 188 people showed that the government has continued to hone its disaster reaction - long considered a crucial leadership test in China - since a much more devastating earthquake in 2008, also in Sichuan, and another one in 2010 in the western region of Yushu.
NEWS
April 23, 2013 | By Gillian Wong, Associated Press
YA'AN, China - Rescuers and relief teams struggled to rush supplies into the rural hills of China's Sichuan province Sunday after an earthquake left at least 180 people dead and more than 11,000 injured and prompted frightened survivors to spend a night in cars, tents, and makeshift shelters. The earthquake Saturday morning triggered landslides that cut off roads and disrupted phone and power connections in mountainous Lushan county, in Sichuan's Ya'an city area, which is farther south on the same fault line where a devastating quake wreaked widespread damage five years ago. Hardest hit were villages farther up the valleys, where farmers grow rice and vegetables on terraced plots.
NEWS
April 22, 2013 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
LUSHAN, China - Luo Shiqiang sat near chunks of concrete, bricks and a ripped orange sofa and told how his grandfather was just returning from feeding chickens when their house collapsed and crushed him to death in this weekend's powerful earthquake in southwestern China. "We lost everything in such a short time," the 20-year-old said Sunday. He said that his cousin also was injured in the collapse, but that other members of his family were spared because they were out working in the fields of hard-hit Longmen village in Lushan county.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 10, 2012 | By Molly Eichel and Daily News Staff Writer
WHEN Alison Klayman graduated from Brown University, she decided to go abroad to China for a five-month trip. That extended stay morphed into four years living in the People's Republic. That's where the Wynnewood native, who attended Akiba Hebrew Academy, met the international art superstar and activist Ai Wei Wei, the subject of her new documentary, "Ai Wei Wei: Never Sorry. " Klayman knew she wanted to profile Wei Wei when he told her that he was going to start an investigation around the Sichuan earthquake that killed an estimated 68,000 people, including many children who died when the shoddy infrastructure of their schools collapsed.
NEWS
November 13, 2011 | By Christopher Bodeen, Associated Press
BEIJING - China may make its neighbors nervous with its robust military buildup, but it is also increasingly using the army as part of its charm offensive abroad. The People's Liberation Army, in a cultural shift for an institution known for strident nationalism and unbending loyalty to the Communist Party, is expanding overseas aid missions and military exchanges in a major way. It sent 50 medics to flood-hit Pakistan recently and dispatched a hospital ship in September on a 105-day trip to poor nations in the Caribbean - right in America's backyard.
NEWS
August 19, 2011 | By Christopher Bodeen, Associated Press
BEIJING - Vice President Biden waxed glowingly about China's vice president Thursday at the start of a five-day visit that will give them some serious bonding time. Xi Jinping, the country's expected future leader, seemed to return the warm feelings, with both men emphasizing the importance of personal ties in international relations and the need for their countries to work together on the world's problems. Thursday's meetings between the two, followed by a formal banquet, began to reveal a bit about the personal style of a man who has so far given little indication of how he will rule the world's most populous country, the No. 2 economy, and a powerful potential rival to the United States.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 8, 2010 | By Carrie Rickey, Inquirer Movie Critic
Last Train Home , Lixin Fan's compelling documentary portrait of the human sacrifice behind China's economic miracle, begins with a startling statistic. At Chinese New Year, 130 million migrant workers journey from factories in industrial cities to make their way back to rural villages and towns for an annual visit. It is the world's largest human migration, unfathomable in scope, engorging trains, buses, and boats to the degree that America's Thanksgiving commute looks like an easy hop. The jostle and bustle is not the point of Fan's emotionally involving film, which is to show the enormous gulf between the workers and the families left behind, the collateral damage of industrialization.
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