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Sick Child

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NEWS
December 15, 2000 | By Brendan January, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
On Wednesday night, Andrew Pack was watching a news report about a thief who had stolen a jar of money from a deli. The money had been donated by customers for Jessica Gale, a 4-year-old Pennsauken girl who has spent her entire life on a ventilator. Pack is executive director of the Variety Club, a not-for-profit organization that provides support for disabled children and their families in the Philadelphia region. "It was just that this child had obviously been through a lot - and the fact that someone stole their money," he said.
NEWS
March 23, 1991 | By ELLEN GOODMAN
Try to think of it as good news. The Minnesota Court of Appeals has just ruled that motherhood is not a form of misconduct. This verdict, worthy of one slightly choked cheer of approval, comes courtesy of Diane McCourtney who lost her job when her baby got sick. No, McCourtney is not some star on the Celebrity Working Mother Circuit. She's no Meredith Vieira, who asked for an extension of her part-time gig at 60 Minutes and got a pink slip instead. The Vieira story has all the glitzy elements of class and choice that get the editorial juices stirring.
NEWS
August 18, 2016 | By Mike Newall, Columnist
They came to the cemetery on a broiling afternoon to mourn a little boy most of them had never known. They came one by one and in groups. They came out of anger and sadness and grief. They came, they said, because they felt as if they had to do something for a child so many had failed - and this was all there was left to do. They came to honor Ethan Okula. I wrote about Ethan's short, sad life last month. About how the sweet, intellectually disabled 10-year-old foster child died in February after he fell ill at school.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 22, 2011 | By Carolyn Hax
Question: I have been seeing the same guy for three years. He has made me feel really happy and great about myself, makes me laugh, and we have a very fulfilling relationship. The one problem has been our trust issues. He had a history as a cheater, and I have a history as a cheat-ee. This summer, he was unemployed, and I worked long hours. I felt something was wrong most of the summer ... and finally snooped, only to find out about a few lies he told, and a sketchy message from a girl.
NEWS
December 27, 1992 | By Terri Sanginiti, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
A child's illness can be worrisome in more ways than one for a working parent. If a child can't go to day care, some parents have no choice but to stay home. Now area parents have an alternative. An innovative new child-care program developed by the Greater Cherry Hill Chamber of Commerce in conjunction with Archway Programs may spell relief for a parent who has a mildly sick child but can't afford to miss a day of work. The program is called Helping Homes. Offering sick child care for working parents, it picks up where ordinary day-care programs leave off. "We realized that a need increasingly existed in the business community because business was losing time to employees who were responsible for child care," said chamber president Fran Burnstein.
NEWS
March 22, 2011
The Chamber of Commerce is trying to stop tens of thousands of working Philadelphians - nearly half of the city's workforce - from getting paid sick days ("Business opposes sick-leave proposal," Friday). It is a shameful position that cannot be justified on moral, public health, or business grounds. All too often, Philadelphia workers must go to work ill because they can't afford to lose a day's pay when they are barely able to make ends meet and support their family. Responsible businesses understand that no worker should have to choose between losing a day's pay and coming to work sick or not caring for a sick child, and that paid sick days don't harm the economy.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 5, 1986 | By KAREN KENNEY, Los Angeles Daily News
Two of the difficult questions for working mothers to answer are when to keep a child home from day care or school and what to do if they do have to keep the youngster home. Dr. Miriam Stoppard, a British health educator and mother of four boys, has written her answer to those questions in a book of common sense called the "Baby & Child A to Z Medical Handbook" (Body Press, Tucson; $9.95). "I wanted it to be the most helpful book I could have if it were 2 a.m., I lived a distance from a doctor and I was faced with a sick child," she said.
NEWS
May 23, 2013 | By Mike Newall, Inquirer Staff Writer
The death of the 8-month-old son of a Northeast Philadelphia faith-healing couple already on probation for the negligence death of another child has been ruled a homicide by a medical examiner, law enforcement sources said Tuesday. Brandon Scott Schaible died last month of bacterial pneumonia, severe dehydration, and infection at his parents' Rhawnhurst home after the parents withheld medical care, according to a report by Assistant Medical Examiner Gary Collins. The baby had had difficulty breathing, was irritable, and had little appetite for three days before his death, the report said.
NEWS
January 11, 2002 | By Robert Moran INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Eagles-Buccaneers playoff game tomorrow is sold out, but 500 lucky "everyday heroes" will get tickets courtesy of the Eagles organization. Forty tickets were given to the Philadelphia Fire Department and many are going to hazardous-materials responders stationed at 24th and Wolf Streets in South Philadelphia. "They've been busier than hell since the anthrax scare started," said Timothy McShea, spokesman for Local 22, the firefighters' union. Members of Engine 60 and Ladder 19 joined rapid-assessment teams and responded to 1,263 reports of suspicious packages and powders - "anything the public had a concern about," Executive Chief William Brightcliffe said.
NEWS
March 22, 2002
IT WAS heartbreaking to hear about little Marcus Dunson (March 20). I don't believe that the people from the ambulance company who responded to the call would tell his parents that it would cost $300 to take the baby to CHOP and that they should take the baby to the clinic. Who cares how much it costs to transport a baby to the hospital in an emergency? What kind of people have jobs like this? That baby's health was supposed to be more important than the money. My condolences and prayers to the family!
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 18, 2016 | By Mike Newall, Columnist
They came to the cemetery on a broiling afternoon to mourn a little boy most of them had never known. They came one by one and in groups. They came out of anger and sadness and grief. They came, they said, because they felt as if they had to do something for a child so many had failed - and this was all there was left to do. They came to honor Ethan Okula. I wrote about Ethan's short, sad life last month. About how the sweet, intellectually disabled 10-year-old foster child died in February after he fell ill at school.
NEWS
February 14, 2014 | BY GARY THOMPSON, Daily News Staff Writer thompsg@phillynews.com, 215-854-5992
THE Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology recently reported that couples can cut their divorce rate dramatically by watching romantic movies and talking about them. In fact, the movie approach is just as good as intensive therapy, say psychologists, who measured results after prescribing therapy to one group, a pool of 87 love stories to another. And, frankly, you don't have to give a damn if the movies are any good. One was "Gone with the Wind," one was "Please Don't Eat the Daisies.
NEWS
May 23, 2013 | By Mike Newall, Inquirer Staff Writer
The death of the 8-month-old son of a Northeast Philadelphia faith-healing couple already on probation for the negligence death of another child has been ruled a homicide by a medical examiner, law enforcement sources said Tuesday. Brandon Scott Schaible died last month of bacterial pneumonia, severe dehydration, and infection at his parents' Rhawnhurst home after the parents withheld medical care, according to a report by Assistant Medical Examiner Gary Collins. The baby had had difficulty breathing, was irritable, and had little appetite for three days before his death, the report said.
NEWS
March 6, 2013
SHOULD HOURLY workers be able to earn paid sick days? A bill in City Council that mandated businesses to provide paid sick leave was vetoed by Mayor Nutter in 2011, but it may be having a second wind: Council holds hearings Tuesday on an amended bill. Back when the bill was first promoted by Councilmen Darrell Clarke and Bill Greenlee, many business leaders complained that it would be another obstacle to job creation in a city that already has a punishing wage tax to contend with.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 22, 2011 | By Carolyn Hax
Question: I have been seeing the same guy for three years. He has made me feel really happy and great about myself, makes me laugh, and we have a very fulfilling relationship. The one problem has been our trust issues. He had a history as a cheater, and I have a history as a cheat-ee. This summer, he was unemployed, and I worked long hours. I felt something was wrong most of the summer ... and finally snooped, only to find out about a few lies he told, and a sketchy message from a girl.
NEWS
June 29, 2011 | By JAN RANSOM, ransomj@phillynews.com 215-854-5218
Just as expected, Mayor Nutter yesterday smacked down a bill that would require most city employers to provide paid sick leave. The bill, introduced in 2008 by City Councilmen Bill Greenlee and Darrell Clarke, barely made it out of Council nearly two weeks ago with a 9-8 vote. It remains unclear whether Council can pull the necessary 12 votes to override Nutter's veto. A vote to override cannot be made until Council's next session on Sept. 8. Nutter made the announcement inside the Chamber of Commerce, where he said that the bill would put city businesses at a competitive disadvantage.
BUSINESS
June 16, 2011 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Dewetta Logan and Bill Mignucci both own businesses in Philadelphia. Both give their employees paid time off. How the employees use that time is up to them. They can call in sick. They can stay home to care for a sick child. They can go to the beach. It doesn't matter. "It's simpler," said Mignucci, president of Di Bruno Bros., the gourmet food-and-cheese company with stores in South Philadelphia and Center City. Di Bruno Bros. employs about 200. Logan, who employs eight at her West Philadelphia day-care center, Smart Beginnings Early Learning Center, agrees.
NEWS
June 7, 2011
By requiring that all Philadelphia companies provide paid sick leave to their employees, City Council would be putting the city and local businesses at a further competitive disadvantage with communities in the suburbs and beyond. City firms already coping with a job-killing wage tax and a thicket of regulations don't need another albatross in the form of an employee benefit that's not required just across City Avenue. For low-wage workers, supposedly the biggest beneficiaries of the proposal, the impact at small firms could be just the opposite - as businesses struggling with a new expense are forced to lay off workers.
NEWS
May 24, 2011
IT'S COMPLETELY unfair that some workers don't get paid sick days. We can commiserate with parents who are faced with the choice of staying home to care for a sick child and losing a day's pay, or sending the child to school; likewise, for someone who is ill and has to drag himself to work because he can't afford to have one unpaid day. That said, City Council has no business mandating that employers offer paid sick days to their employees....
NEWS
March 22, 2011
The Chamber of Commerce is trying to stop tens of thousands of working Philadelphians - nearly half of the city's workforce - from getting paid sick days ("Business opposes sick-leave proposal," Friday). It is a shameful position that cannot be justified on moral, public health, or business grounds. All too often, Philadelphia workers must go to work ill because they can't afford to lose a day's pay when they are barely able to make ends meet and support their family. Responsible businesses understand that no worker should have to choose between losing a day's pay and coming to work sick or not caring for a sick child, and that paid sick days don't harm the economy.
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