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Sid Mark

ENTERTAINMENT
May 17, 1998 | By Tanya Barrientos, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER Staff writers Dan DeLuca and Dianna Marder contributed to this story
Not long after 29-year-old Ernest Foundas learned that Frank Sinatra had died, Foundas was planning a wake at his Queen Village home. He and 30 of his closest friends intended to have cocktails at 9 p.m. Friday, and a eulogy at midnight. Earlier in the evening, other young people gathered for happy hour at the 700 club, where the music was all Sinatra. Tonight at the Five Spot in Old City, there will be a special Sinatra tribute dinner. If you thought only the over-60 crowd revered Sinatra, think again.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 17, 1998 | By Michael L. Rozansky, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER Photographs used in this section are from the Associated Press, Reuters and Inquirer archives
Rocky from Hammonton was on the line to WRDR-FM (104.9), in Egg Harbor. He'd seen Frank at Palumbo's in South Philly, at the Latin Casino in Cherry Hill, at the Spectrum with Sammy and Liza. "Love is something you give away," said Rocky, his voice cracking, "and he gave a lot of it away. " It's all right to cry, the radio host said. Rocky wept: "I'm 62 years old, and I can do what I want to. " With Frank Sinatra's death, fans have turned this weekend to their radios and their televisions to connect and reminisce.
NEWS
May 17, 1998
Francis Albert Sinatra, the 20th century's most celebrated saloon singer and a swaggeringly lovable tough guy to several generations, left us with so many melodic fantasies and real-life memories that he'll never really be gone. He left behind a couple hundred songs that radio personalities such as Philadelphia's own Sid Mark will play for another hundred years. And with his passing Thursday at age 82, Sinatra movies, including The Manchurian Candidate, Some Came Running and the Oscar-winning From Here To Eternity, will no doubt fly out of video stores.
NEWS
May 16, 1998 | by Theresa Conroy, Daily News Staff Writer
During the last 43 years, Sid Mark has spent more weekends with Frank than any of Sinatra's wives have. Fridays with Frank, Saturdays with Sinatra, Sundays with Sinatra - Mark shared hours upon hours of singular musical devotion to Ol' Blue Eyes. It's no wonder then, that Philadelphia's Sinatra guru was deeply, inconsolably wounded by the death of a man who was like a brother. "He is family," said Mark, who first met Sinatra in 1966. "There is really no difference than the passing of a member of my family.
NEWS
May 16, 1998 | By Kevin L. Carter and Dianna Marder, INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS Inquirer Staff Writer Michael Rozansky contributed to this article
For Sid Mark, there will be life after Sinatra. Mark's lonnnng-running (43 years worth) Sinatra-only radio shows on WWDB-FM (96.5) will continue, and probably even flourish, as new generations discover Ol' Blue Eyes and as concert recordings that had been held back are posthumously released. But for now, Mark is among the mourning, finding it hard to believe that one of his best friends is gone. Yesterday, faced with the contradiction of being stunned by the expected, Mark - always a gentleman on-air - was a little quieter, his voice more somber.
NEWS
September 4, 1997 | By Kevin Carter, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Philly's a good talk-radio town, but lots of the best talk comes from elsewhere. And when you think about nationally syndicated radio in Philadelphia, the first thing that comes to mind is Howard Stern. Stern, America's morning id who shows us his private parts figuratively and literally as much as possible, rules the Philadelphia morning airwaves on WYSP-FM (94.1) from 6 a.m. until well past 10. Fellow New Yorker Don Imus, at one time one of Stern's most bitter radio enemies, brings his acerbic wit and political satire to the morning show at WPHI-AM (1210)
ENTERTAINMENT
July 3, 1997 | By Kevin L. Carter, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In radio, no program is safe from moving or cancellation. Not even a show that has been on the air in the same time slot for 42 years. Starting Saturday, Sid Mark's Friday With Frank, which had aired between 5 and 9 p.m. since the mid-'50s on FM station 96.5 will become Saturday With Sinatra, airing from 8 p.m. to midnight. Mark's other show, Sunday With Sinatra, will continue in its same time slot: 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Mark, who has been in love with the music of Frank Sinatra since he was a kid in Camden named Sidney Mark Fliegelman, said the new time period was fine with him. "It was a very pleasant meeting," said Mark of his sit-down with management.
NEWS
November 10, 1991 | By Laurie Hollman, Inquirer Staff Writer
Frank Sinatra is the George Washington of our generation. Only instead of where George slept, in South Philadelphia, it's where Frank ate. In pictures and photographs, he's everywhere. Walk into Nick's Roast Beef, and there's Frank next to the bar in a large photograph taken by a friend of the owner's which shows an older, wiser Francis Albert in tuxedo singing - microphone in one hand, knee up. Someone taped a little green shamrock to his breast pocket, a reminder that you don't have to be Italian to like Sinatra.
NEWS
July 18, 1991 | By Louis R. Carlozo, Special to The Inquirer
A blond woman in a bright orange jumpsuit grabs your wrist, asking you to look straight into her powder-blue eyes while she confesses just how deeply her feelings run for Frank Sinatra: "He teaches life," she says. "It's like he was the teacher and I was the student. " Alice Frascella of Philadelphia is one of many worshipers. "He's Babe Ruth when it comes to music," said Marty McCrossen, 37, of South Philadelphia. "He's probably the best thing to happen to popular music.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 12, 1990 | By Mark de la Vina, Daily News Staff Writer
The moment Frank Sinatra's voice hit the airwaves, Betty Brown broke into hysterics, falling to her knees in front of the radio and screaming as if her heart was being ripped from her body. That was 1941. "I don't know when I stopped screaming when he sang," Brown, 65, said. "It just petered out. I matured. " Brown reclined in her "inner sanctum," a living room that doubles as a Sinatra shrine. Autographed photos, posters and a bronze statuette from the late '40s were scattered along the one wall.
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