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Sidearm

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SPORTS
April 2, 1996 | By Brian Miller, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Coatesville's Lance Ziegler stepped up to the plate, and Steve Fitch wanted to get him out. Badly. The two players are friends. But they're also fierce competitors. And on this special April night last year, in the Ches-Mont League opener for both Coatesville and West Chester Henderson, Fitch figured a little extra heat was needed to bury the Raiders slugger deep in the count. So with the count 1-1, Fitch dropped down, threw a hard, sidearm fastball, and ended his season. The ball left his hand, and Fitch heard a sickening pop in his right elbow.
NEWS
October 28, 2011
IN WASHINGTON, Congress has under development a federal bill seeking states' reciprocity rules for granting the individual's "right to carry" sidearm guns. In Pennsylvania, any resident who, by legal scrutiny, has forfeited his right to carry concealed sidearm weapons could go to some other state, pass a less-strenuous background check followed by lesser firearm regulations and then return to Pennsylvania's cities legally armed and dangerous. All the while, nationally, city populations are under siege with the growing menace of lethal weapons.
NEWS
June 28, 1990 | By Larry Borska, Special to The Inquirer
West Chester American Legion baseball coach Keith Helfant had not seen Steve Catrambone pitch before, so he didn't know what to expect when he scheduled the recent Bishop Shanahan graduate to start against rival Downingtown. Helfant was impressed. In his first start of the American Legion season, Catrambone allowed just 1 unearned run on 3 hits and struck out 10 to lead first-place West Chester (11-1) to a 3-1 victory over second-place Downingtown (9-3) on Monday. "He was throwing a lot of sidearm stuff - a sidearm fastball that was sinking and a sidearm curve - and it was unhittable," said Helfant, the Haverford School baseball coach who is in his first year as the West Chester American Legion coach.
SPORTS
December 29, 1995 | By Tim Panaccio, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
As he watches film of Scott Mitchell, Kevin Johnson of the Eagles wonders if he and his defensive-line mates will ever get to the Detroit Lions' quarterback in tomorrow's NFC wild-card playoff game. Johnson sees the tall lefthander take a three-step drop, make a quick read downfield, then sling the ball sidearm toward Herman Moore, Brett Perriman or Johnnie Morton. Johnson worries because the Eagles' defensive line didn't get a single sack on the Bears' Erik Kramer in Sunday's regular-season-ending loss.
SPORTS
September 7, 1991 | By Dave Caldwell, Inquirer Staff Writer
Was that a great Manute Bol impersonation the Eagles' defense showed us on Sunday or what? Green Bay quarterback Don Majkowski must have thought he was playing in the pro beach-volleyball league, because a lot of the passes that he tried to loft over the Eagles' pass rush were spiked right back at him. The Eagles knocked down 14 passes in the 20-3 victory, seven at the line of scrimmage. On one play, a Majkowski pass was slapped in the air by Reggie White, knocked in the air again by Majkowski, then hauled in by Eagles defensive tackle Mike Golic, who lumbered 13 yards to the Green Bay 26-yard line.
SPORTS
February 2, 1998 | Daily News Wire Services
Anna May Hutchison, a star in the women's professional baseball circuit immortalized in the film "A League of Their Own," has died at the age of 73 in Racine, Wis. Services will be held today for Hutchison, known as "Hutch" when she played in the All-American Girl's Professional Baseball League. Hutchison, as a member of the Racine Belles, rose from obscure catcher to ace pitcher in 1946 and '47. She mastered the new sidearm delivery and won 53 games with it. Her delivery method eventually caused arm problems that shortened her career.
SPORTS
November 23, 2011 | BY ZACH BERMAN, bermanz@phillynews.com
SURPRISE, Ariz. - The few batters who reach first base when Jake Diekman pitches usually greet Cody Overbeck with a similar refrain: "I don't like facing him. " Diekman, a lefthanded reliever in the Phillies organization, has ascended in the minor leagues with first baseman Overbeck, who's encountered enough baserunners wanting to let off steam after 90 feet to share their unrest. "I've never heard as many batters get on first and complain about facing someone," Overbeck said of Diekman before a recent Arizona Fall League game.
NEWS
April 4, 1994 | By Brian Miller, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Successful baseball pitchers have a rhythm, a flow, a tempo on the mound. It's a rhythm that assures that the mechanics of the delivery will stay sound and true throughout the pitching motion. A pitcher can't rush his delivery. In the jargon of baseball, rushing "breaks down" a pitcher's delivery, usually resulting in a high pitch out of the strike zone. The Haverford School's Tom Curtiss knows all about rushing his delivery since that is about his only flaw on the mound. Yet if Curtiss stays in his groove all season, his talented left arm should give the Fords a real shot at the Inter-Academic League title this spring.
SPORTS
August 25, 1999 | Daily News Wire Services
Standing at his locker with a bulky bag of ice atop his right shoulder, John Smoltz struggled to recall his last victory. "Uh, let me think," Smoltz said, stammering for the answer. "That seems so long ago. " The Atlanta righthander won for the first time in more than two months last night, allowing just four hits in eight innings to keep the host Braves atop the NL East with a 6-4 victory over the Cincinnati Reds. The Braves scored four runs in the sixth to overcome a 3-2 deficit and snap Pete Harnisch's eight-game winning streak.
SPORTS
September 20, 1989 | By Les Bowen, Daily News Sports Writer
Bruce Ruffin perfectly symbolizes the frustrating 1989 Phillies. At various times this season, Ruffin has been alarmingly awful and encouragingly good. But mostly, he has been mediocre to bad, as he was in last night's clumsy, 4-2 loss to the Pirates. Just a few weeks ago, Phils manager Nick Leyva felt Ruffin might have turned yet another corner in this rat's maze of a season. Ruffin had won two starts in a row and given up a total of two earned runs in those 16 innings. The breakthrough came after the lefthander started feeling soreness in his pitching shoulder, which only hurt when he dropped his motion to three- quarters.
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SPORTS
November 23, 2011 | BY ZACH BERMAN, bermanz@phillynews.com
SURPRISE, Ariz. - The few batters who reach first base when Jake Diekman pitches usually greet Cody Overbeck with a similar refrain: "I don't like facing him. " Diekman, a lefthanded reliever in the Phillies organization, has ascended in the minor leagues with first baseman Overbeck, who's encountered enough baserunners wanting to let off steam after 90 feet to share their unrest. "I've never heard as many batters get on first and complain about facing someone," Overbeck said of Diekman before a recent Arizona Fall League game.
NEWS
October 28, 2011
IN WASHINGTON, Congress has under development a federal bill seeking states' reciprocity rules for granting the individual's "right to carry" sidearm guns. In Pennsylvania, any resident who, by legal scrutiny, has forfeited his right to carry concealed sidearm weapons could go to some other state, pass a less-strenuous background check followed by lesser firearm regulations and then return to Pennsylvania's cities legally armed and dangerous. All the while, nationally, city populations are under siege with the growing menace of lethal weapons.
NEWS
September 14, 2010 | By Daniel R. Biddle and Murray Dubin
The 15th Amendment gave Negro men the vote, and they cast ballots for the first time in a major Philadelphia election in 1871. They were expected to vote Republican, the party of Lincoln. In this excerpt from "Tasting Freedom," William McMullen, a powerful South Philadelphia Democratic ward leader and head of the volunteer Moyamensing Hose Company, knew he had to stop these new voters. Between 7 and 8 on the night before the election, a colored stevedore left his home just below Bainbridge Street.
NEWS
December 15, 2005 | By Kathleen Brady Shea INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Police believe a Bucks County man facing substantial prison time in Montgomery County saw an opportunity to flee in Chester County and violently seized it on June 30. Yesterday in Chester County Court, Chad Daher Myers, 26, of Quakertown, received 13 to 26 years in prison on charges that included aggravated assault, escape, carjacking, and theft of a firearm. Under a plea bargain, Myers admitted freeing a hand from his cuffs, lunging for a constable's gun, firing shots, stealing a nearby vehicle, speeding from police, and crashing the stolen black Jeep into a beer truck in Narberth.
NEWS
October 4, 2000 | By Kristen A. Graham, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Recalling the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.'s assassination, relatives of five Gloucester County youths who were reportedly shot at by two off-duty East Greenwich police officers called for justice from the Prosecutor's Office yesterday. A phalanx of nine family members and neighbors stood in front of a soldiers' memorial at the Justice Complex, where the officers are on trial in the shootings, and said the young men, who are black, were targeted because of their race. The two white officers, Fred Gismondi, 29, of National Park, and Steven Thayer, 27, of West Deptford are charged with driving a pickup truck through the Thorofare section of West Deptford on April 4, 1998, and firing 10 shots from Thayer's .40-caliber police sidearm at the five cousins.
SPORTS
August 25, 1999 | Daily News Wire Services
Standing at his locker with a bulky bag of ice atop his right shoulder, John Smoltz struggled to recall his last victory. "Uh, let me think," Smoltz said, stammering for the answer. "That seems so long ago. " The Atlanta righthander won for the first time in more than two months last night, allowing just four hits in eight innings to keep the host Braves atop the NL East with a 6-4 victory over the Cincinnati Reds. The Braves scored four runs in the sixth to overcome a 3-2 deficit and snap Pete Harnisch's eight-game winning streak.
SPORTS
June 17, 1999 | by Ted Silary, Daily News Sports Writer
If Mike Koplove reaches the major leagues, he'll enter through the side door. Koplove, a South Philadelphia resident and 1995 Chestnut Hill Academy graduate, is pitching "pretty close to sidearm" in his second season as an Arizona Diamondbacks farmhand. So far, so great. Koplove's setup work for the South Bend (Ind.) Silver Hawks has earned him a spot in the Class A Midwest League All-Star Game, set for Tuesday in Lansing, Mich. I'd messed around with throwing sidearm all along, but then I decided to resort to it full time," Koplove said.
NEWS
January 15, 1999 | By Robert Moran, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Two days after an off-duty officer who had allegedly abused his wife shot her and then killed himself, Police Commissioner John F. Timoney ordered yesterday that department-issued sidearms be taken from any officer who is the subject of a protection-from-abuse order. Such officers will be taken off the street and assigned to desk duty until the domestic-abuse allegations that led to the court orders have been resolved, Timoney said. Timoney said his order, which was several months in the making, would not have prevented Tuesday's incident, in which Officer George Burella, 35, shot his wife Jill, 33, and then turned the gun on himself in the couple's Somerton home.
SPORTS
February 2, 1998 | Daily News Wire Services
Anna May Hutchison, a star in the women's professional baseball circuit immortalized in the film "A League of Their Own," has died at the age of 73 in Racine, Wis. Services will be held today for Hutchison, known as "Hutch" when she played in the All-American Girl's Professional Baseball League. Hutchison, as a member of the Racine Belles, rose from obscure catcher to ace pitcher in 1946 and '47. She mastered the new sidearm delivery and won 53 games with it. Her delivery method eventually caused arm problems that shortened her career.
SPORTS
August 4, 1996 | By Jayson Stark, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Imagine it is 1964 again, and you are a righthanded hitter standing 60 feet, 6 inches from James Paul David Bunning. Good luck. There is a glare on his face that suggests you will be lucky to dribble one three inches in front of home plate. Then he rocks into that big, deliberate windup, arms wheeling up to the brim of his cap, then flying behind his back. Now here comes the baseball - out of a sidearm delivery so exaggerated, Bunning's right arm looks as if it must be 11 feet long.
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