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Sidewalks

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NEWS
June 18, 1989 | By J. F. Casale, Special to The Inquirer
The Langhorne Borough Council has instructed Solicitor C. Anne Porter to draft specifications for installing brick sidewalks in the historic borough, despite a 10-year-old ordinance prohibiting new brick sidewalks. Council Vice President Tom Court questioned the need for the action in light of a statement from the building inspector that brick sidewalks were hazardous. Council President Kathy Horwatt said brick sidewalks enhanced the borough's historic ambience, and she cited the requests of several residents to replace their concrete sidewalks with brick.
NEWS
September 10, 1989 | By Christine Hausman, Special to The Inquirer
More than 60 Ivyland residents have been told to fix their sidewalks, or the borough will hire someone to do it and send them the bills. On Aug. 7, 67 homeowners, about 40 percent of all the property owners in the borough, were sent notices telling them they had 90 days to repair portions of their sidewalks that a Borough Council member had deemed dangerous. Borough Council President John Hall said the measure was meant to ensure the safety of pedestrians. He said the Borough Council was worried that someone who tripped on a sidewalk could sue the borough for failing to ride herd on property owners.
NEWS
September 6, 1990 | By Ward Allebach, Special to The Inquirer
When gas was cheap and the air was cleaner in the 1970s, local people didn't think much about walking in Montgomery Township, according to Supervisor Chairman Robert R. Kuhn. Traffic wasn't bad, either, so people could drive down the street and drive around the corner without a hassle. Supervisors didn't want sidewalks then. Who needed them? "Back in those days, we were still a rural community . . . and sidewalks weren't considered rural," said Daniel P. Olpere, the township manager.
NEWS
September 19, 1991 | By Sandra Sardella, Special to The Inquirer
Although some parents are still upset over Lindenwold's on-again, off-again busing for students who live within 2 miles of school, those who have accepted their children's pedestrian fate are upset that some students have no sidewalks on which to walk. Egg Harbor, Chews Landing, Gibbsboro and Laurel Roads - all county highways that serve as direct routes to either Lindenwold Elementary Schools No. 4 or 5 - have no sidewalks, for the most part. "The kids need a safe way to get to school, whether it be by bus or by sidewalk," said Susan Malick, whose child walks about a mile to School No. 4 along winding, narrow, two-lane Egg Harbor Road.
NEWS
July 8, 1987 | By Bob Tulini, Special to The Inquirer
Because of contradictory language in an ordinance, the Borough of Magnolia must pay for last year's installation of curbs and sidewalks in front of about 17 homes on West Atlantic Avenue. The Borough Council made the announcement at last Wednesday's meeting. Council member Denis Reid said that ordinarily the borough bills homeowners for curbs and sidewalks that are installed in front of their homes while road improvements are being made. But not in this case, borough officials said.
NEWS
March 17, 1986
I commend the Greater Philadelphia Chamber of Commerce for its well- considered proposal about how the city ought to deal with "vent people" (Op-ed Page, March 4). I'll bet there are many people like me, who, when we see vent people in the middle of the sidewalks, day after day, as we walk to work, first feel angry at them for being there (for making our world look as dismal as they do) - and then we feel angry at ourselves for our lack of compassion. Malcolm Lazin is right: The vent people do not belong on our sidewalks.
NEWS
December 6, 1987 | By Shelly Phillips, Special to The Inquirer
The board sidewalks in downtown West Chester in the 1870s were a disaster. In the spring, mud oozed over the wood, making walking precarious and long skirts unspeakably dirty. And so it was that merchants followed the 1840s lead of many homeowners by installing brick sidewalks in front of their stores. Brick sidewalks are once again a subject of controversy in West Chester, but this time the issue is one of contract compliance rather than aesthetics or muddy clothes. At a meeting Nov. 24, Borough Council members rejected a request from the developers and homeowners of Brinton Square at Church, Biddle and Washington Streets to leave intact a mistakenly laid portion of brick-striped concrete sidewalk on Biddle Street when plans called for all-brick sidewalks.
NEWS
April 26, 1990 | By Joe Ferry, Special to The Inquirer
Darryl Beltz and his wife, Patti, have lived in their turn-of-the-century, three-story Victorian house on Shearer Street in North Wales for five years. Part of the reason they moved into the quaint section of the borough was its towering maple and oak trees and its distinctive slate, brick and concrete sidewalks. They sensed the neighborhood would have a character all its own. But the reconstruction and widening of Shearer Street has claimed the stately shade trees. And now the Borough Council has sounded the death knell for some of its more distinctive sidewalks as well.
NEWS
November 12, 1992 | By Dominic Sama, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A Radnor Township commissioner who calls himself "Mr. Sidewalk" continued his crusade Monday night for better walkways in the township and was promised that his proposal would be discussed at a future meeting. Commissioner Bill Spingler has been trying to push through a certificate of occupancy ordinance that he said would ensure safer sidewalks at the cost of the homeowner. The current ordinance on sidewalks, he said, is weak and difficult to enforce. Only 5 percent of Radnor has sidewalks, said Township Engineer B. Duncan Hubley, and most are in commercial areas.
NEWS
April 9, 1989 | By Gina Esposito, Special to The Inquirer
Aldan Borough Councilman Joseph A. McCollian Jr. is going to be watching his step this week. McCollian will be inspecting the borough's sidewalks to ensure that residents are maintaining their properties. The inspection, which is done annually by the chairman of the highway and sewer committee and the code inspection officer, includes checking for broken sidewalks that are deemed potential hazards to pedestrians. "The people that want to take care of their property usually maintain it without prompting," McCollian said at a council meeting Wednesday night.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
May 23, 2016 | By Mike Newall, Columnist
The homeless outreach teams arrived at Rittenhouse Square just before the morning rush hour. They had come to check in on familiar faces, park regulars who have refused to come inside for years - or even decades. Like Aaron, a paranoid schizophrenic who will soon turn 50, and whose matted dreadlocks have formed into a solid, winding cable of hair. He wanted to be left the hell alone, he said. But the team had come intent on engaging new faces, too. Like the cursing man wearing a heavy coat, a stethoscope, and rubber gloves and carrying a bulky photo album.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 2, 2016 | Jennifer Adams, For The Inquirer
Q: I saw your article about outdoor lighting. Do you do consults? I'm in a three-story condo building in a downtown location, and we want to light the sidewalk along the entrance to our building. It's very dark there at night. - K.W. A: Thank you so much for writing. Unfortunately, for many reasons, I can't personally consult on a project like this. But I can provide some ideas that you can discuss with a local landscape contractor or electrician, as well as your building manager or homeowners' association.
NEWS
March 17, 2016 | By Stu Bykofsky
THE FIRST TIME, she walked around for 45 minutes to work up the nerve to do it. As someone who shuns the spotlight, approaching a homeless person with an offer of food, a handout, was outside her comfort zone. "I thought people would be resentful," Sharon Suleta says. The first time was nine weeks ago this very night, in the Suburban Station underground concourse. Dragging a food-filled luggage cart behind her, with a socks-stuffed canvas bag over her arm, she approached those who appeared to be homeless and asked, "Would you like a dinner bag?"
NEWS
March 10, 2016
Random stabbings by a 55-year-old unidentified man in Southwest Philadelphia on Tuesday left one man dead and two hospitalized, police said. The first victim, a 31-year-old man was paying his bill at a Cricket Wireless store in the 5500 Block of Baltimore Avenue when the assailant walked in and, unprovoked, stabbed him in the chest, said Lt. John Walker of Southwest Detectives. The second victim, a 51-year-old man, was sitting in his car outside the store when the assailant climbed into the passenger side of the car. The man suffered stab wounds in both hands as he struggled with the assailant, Walker said.
NEWS
September 11, 2015
I TOOK A WALK in the sun a few days back with the Dynamic Duo, looking for sidewalk hazards. The Dynamic Duo are Debby Schaaf and Pamela Freyd, unpaid volunteer co-chairwomen of the 4-year-old Feet First Philly, which is sponsored by the Clean Air Council. Feet First Philly promotes the novel idea that sidewalks belong to the people who walk them. Crazy, isn't it? Feet First has done surveys (you can volunteer or chime in at www.feetfirstphilly.org ) of sidewalk obstacles.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 11, 2015 | Inga Saffron, Inquirer Architecture Critic
Jim Kenney's famous temper was on full view the day we strolled around Center City, looking at construction sites. More specifically, we were looking at construction sites where the sidewalks had been blocked. There aren't many things that make the Democratic mayoral candidate madder than having to cross the street because of a sidewalk closure - except when contractors treat the cordoned-off space as free parking. "Tell me why that's necessary," Kenney sputtered as we reached the corner of 15th and Chestnut, where the 51-story W Hotel is going up. His face reddened, his eyes flashed.
NEWS
March 28, 2015 | By Sarah Smith, Inquirer Staff Writer
By summertime, even the streets of the Gayborhood will be covered in rainbows. The crosswalks on 12th and Locust and 13th and Locust will be permanently painted over with rainbows, thanks to a partnership between the LGBT organization Philly Pride Presents and the city. While the final date for the installation hasn't been set, the sidewalks will be dedicated July 5, according to the organization's Facebook post. Philly Pride Presents executive director Franny Price said there were a few issues left to iron out with the city's Streets Department, but said the rainbow sidewalks were absolutely going forward.
NEWS
June 29, 2014 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
Southeastern Pennsylvania's recreational trail network - already the envy of many other metro areas - is getting a $7.5 million infusion through a federal program aimed at providing alternatives to vehicle-based transportation. The money will fund 11 projects in all five counties, closing a gap in a Central Bucks trail, building a multiuse trail in Lansdale, putting sidewalks in Swarthmore, and adding $1.25 million to the city's bike share program, launching next spring. Completion may be several years off, but ultimately, "what this will do is help get people out of their cars and onto sidewalks and multiuse trails," said Joseph Banks, a project implementation coordinator at the Delaware Valley Regional Planning Commission.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 21, 2014 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Architecture Critic
More than a month later, the horror of Zachary Woods' death still sends a chill down a pedestrian's spine. The 27-year-old Wharton student was walking along Walnut Street toward the Penn campus on a bright Tuesday morning when an out-of-control motorist slammed into another car at the 30th Street intersection. Spinning like a top, the car jumped the sidewalk on the south side and sent Woods plunging over the railing into Penn Park, 38 feet below. While news reports called it a "freak accident," you can't help wondering if it was entirely unpredictable.
NEWS
December 26, 2013 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Architecture Critic
Jason R. Nathan, 84, a government official who oversaw the construction of public housing projects throughout the Northeastern United States during the 1960s, but also went out of his way to fund Society Hill's colonial-style lamp posts and brick sidewalks, died Tuesday, Dec. 17, of heart failure at a Haverford nursing home. Mr. Nathan, who spent most of his adult life in Philadelphia, was running the mid-Atlantic office of the Department of Housing and Urban Development during the period when cities across the country were clear-cutting old neighborhoods and replacing them with cookie-cutter housing towers.
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