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Sidney Kimmel

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NEWS
November 13, 2002
"It was morning in the valley of the Great River," writes author James Vollbracht in his children's book, The Way of the Circle. As the sun rose over the river, an old man in ancient China ferried visitors - young and old, rich and poor - from one side of the water to the other. On these trips, he gently reminded his passengers about "the Way of the Circle, the way of life. " "See how the circles flow from the center of my staff and out into the river? Each circle grows larger and larger as it moves across the water, touching all that is in its path.
BUSINESS
May 16, 1994 | by Francesca Chapman, Daily News Staff Writer
Music buffs know Sidney Kimmel as the guy who jump-started the Philadelphia Orchestra's lagging development drive with a $12 million grant to help build a $140 million concert hall. But they may not know he's also the guy who brought us Mickey Rourke melting an ice cube on Kim Basinger in "9 1/2 Weeks. " He brought us Famous Amos cookies, for a while. He's also has outfitted millions of women in snappy business suits and elegant sportswear. And with the money he's worth from all that - a little more than $465 million, according to Forbes' latest list of the 400 richest Americans - Kimmel has joined an exclusive club of Philadelphia philanthropists.
NEWS
October 17, 2001 | By Stephan Salisbury INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Sidney Kimmel, supporter of the performing-arts center on South Broad Street that now bears his name, has given $5 million to the National Constitution Center, under construction at the north end of Independence Mall, and will have that facility's theater named in his honor. The Constitution Center is slated to open July 4, 2003. Joseph M. Torsella, president of the center, said that funding for the "hard costs" of building the center was now virtually complete. Construction is expected to cost about $105 million.
NEWS
March 20, 1996 | By Michael Vitez, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Sidney Kimmel, an area clothing manufacturer and philanthropist, has given $10 million to Thomas Jefferson University for cancer research and treatment, the university announced yesterday. In honor of Kimmel's gift, the largest ever received by Jefferson from an individual, the university has renamed its cancer center and research institute the Kimmel Cancer Center of Jefferson Medical College and the Kimmel Cancer Institute. Kimmel is founder and chairman of Jones Apparel Group, a manufacturer of women's clothing based in Bristol.
NEWS
April 17, 2002 | Daily News wire services
Sidney Kimmel received $2.5M bonus last year Sidney Kimmel, chairman and CEO of Bristol-based Jones Apparel Group Inc., received a bonus of $2.5 million in 2001, up 85 percent from $1.4 million in 2000. According to a proxystatement filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission, Kimmel received a salary of $1.2 million in 2001, up from $1.1 million in 2000. Born in Philadelphia, Kimmel is one of the region's biggest philanthropists. His company designs women's apparel.
BUSINESS
May 16, 1994 | DAILY NEWS GRAPHIC
In the almost 50 years since graduating from West Philadelphia High (above), Sidney Kimmel has pursued numerous opportunities. His most successful is the Jones Apparel Group (left), which has a plant in Bristol. Other investments include Famous Amos cookies and the movies "Blame It On Rio" (top) and "9 1/2 Weeks. " He was unable to buy the Miami Heat NBA franchise last year.
NEWS
March 14, 2013 | By Peter Mucha, Philly.com
Over the last dozen years, Philadelphia has lost so many billionaires - 10 names in all - it no longer has sole bragging rights in Pennsylvania. Judging from Forbes' latest list of the world's wealthiest people, the Pittsburgh and Philly areas are now tied with three residents apiece with 10-figure fortunes. If not for newcomer Michael Rubin , e-commerce whiz and 76ers part-owner, Pittsburgh would have been first - just as it is in Super Bowls (six to zip). Although more than a dozen billionaires either grew up in the Philadelphia area (like newly listed Valley Forge-born designer Tory Burch , investor/philanthropist Ronald Perelman , apparel-and-entertainment tycoon/philanthropist Sidney Kimmel , and ex-Eagles owner Norman Braman )
NEWS
June 20, 2014
It's important that a man remember his roots, which is exactly what Sidney Kimmel did in announcing that the foundation that bears his name is donating $110 million to Thomas Jefferson University. "If it wasn't Philadelphia, I probably would not have considered the gift," said Kimmel, who in 1970 launched the Jones New York women's clothing brand. "I feel good about Philadelphia. It's my home. " The donation arrives as the university and Thomas Jefferson University Hospital are being reunited under a new leader, Stephen K. Klasko, who says his goal is a "revolution in academic health care.
NEWS
June 14, 2000
It's traditional to name public venues for benefactors, individual or corporate. Without their big bucks, the projects may not materialize. The Regional Performing Arts Center this afternoon becomes the Kimmel Center for the Performing Arts, and it couldn't happen to a more deserving philanthropist. Manufacturer, movie mogul, sports executive and humanitarian (there are Kimmel Cancer Centers at Thomas Jefferson University and in San Diego), Sidney Kimmel has not only contributed millions to the center - due to open next year at Broad and Spruce - but he came to its rescue when the project was in danger of self-destructing.
NEWS
July 26, 1995 | by Dave Davies, Daily News Staff Writer
It's a good week for the city's struggling Avenue of the Arts. A key project, the proposed new orchestra concert hall has avoided a disastrous setback, and the University of the Arts, a major force on South Broad Street, has gotten a $22 million grant. The Sidney Kimmel Foundation, named for the Jones New York clothing magnate, yesterday announced it will extend the deadline on its September 1993 promise to give $12 million toward the construction of an orchestra concert hall.
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NEWS
October 13, 2014 | By Paul Jablow, For The Inquirer
Stephen Klasko hadn't been running the Thomas Jefferson University empire for long before his thoughts turned to Sidney Kimmel. A Philadelphia native who became a billionaire in the fashion industry, Kimmel had given generously to Jefferson in the 1990s but not much since despite funding the performing arts center that bears his name. But Klasko, who last month hit the one-year mark as university president and health system chief executive officer, knew Kimmel had built Jones New York by aggressively expanding and thinking outside the box. So his hunch was the two would get along.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 30, 2014 | BY JONATHAN TAKIFF, Daily News Staff Writer takiffj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5960
"HOW do you get to the Academy of Music?" asked the shaggy-haired musician toting an electric guitar. "You can't," was the unfunny reply we ruefully used to share. "Rock's not allowed in our hallowed hall. " That's how it was for decades. But the times, as Bob Dylan sang, are finally a-changin'. Dylan himself returns to the Academy of Music for the first time since 1966 for a series of three electric shows Nov. 21 to 23. Fellow "classic rockers" Neil Young and Jackson Browne play the gorgeous concert hall even sooner: baleful-voiced Young for two nights of career reflections on Oct. 8 and 9; then Browne, running on premium (and all eight cylinders)
NEWS
July 22, 2014
ISSUE | OBAMACARE On Corbett's watch, benefits go to others A recent White House Council of Economic Advisors report details the impact of states' decisions not to expand Medicaid under the Affordable Care Act. In Pennsylvania, the report notes, that has meant 11,100 women have not been eligible for mammograms, and 17,600 did not receive a cervical cancer test. To that, add another 44,400 men and women who did not receive cholesterol-level screenings, along with about 824,000 yearly physician visits that are not happening because Gov., Corbett refuses to expand Medicaid.
NEWS
June 20, 2014
It's important that a man remember his roots, which is exactly what Sidney Kimmel did in announcing that the foundation that bears his name is donating $110 million to Thomas Jefferson University. "If it wasn't Philadelphia, I probably would not have considered the gift," said Kimmel, who in 1970 launched the Jones New York women's clothing brand. "I feel good about Philadelphia. It's my home. " The donation arrives as the university and Thomas Jefferson University Hospital are being reunited under a new leader, Stephen K. Klasko, who says his goal is a "revolution in academic health care.
BUSINESS
December 22, 2013 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Jones Group, the women's clothing wholesaler and retailer started by Philadelphia investor Sidney Kimmel in the late 1960s, has agreed to be bought by Sycamore Partners, a New York buyout firm, for $15 per share in cash. The sale values Jones stock at $1.2 billion. Sycamore will also take on Jones' $1 billion in debt. The company was run from offices in New York and warehouses in Bristol, Bucks County. Jones employs about 6,000 people. In a note from Sycamore Thursday night, Jones workers were told there were no plans to close facilities or cut jobs.
NEWS
March 14, 2013 | By Peter Mucha, Philly.com
Over the last dozen years, Philadelphia has lost so many billionaires - 10 names in all - it no longer has sole bragging rights in Pennsylvania. Judging from Forbes' latest list of the world's wealthiest people, the Pittsburgh and Philly areas are now tied with three residents apiece with 10-figure fortunes. If not for newcomer Michael Rubin , e-commerce whiz and 76ers part-owner, Pittsburgh would have been first - just as it is in Super Bowls (six to zip). Although more than a dozen billionaires either grew up in the Philadelphia area (like newly listed Valley Forge-born designer Tory Burch , investor/philanthropist Ronald Perelman , apparel-and-entertainment tycoon/philanthropist Sidney Kimmel , and ex-Eagles owner Norman Braman )
NEWS
December 31, 2012
ANOTHER YEAR! Can it really be We're about to start 2-0-1-3? We survived a Superstorm named Sandy , Renamed Obama Yankee Doodle Dandy. The Phils and Iggles let us down - So who's on first in our hometown? Happy New Year, Mayor Nutter , And every New Year Mummers strutter; You, too, Andy Reid , while you're still around, Chief Charles Ramsey (keep us safe and sound), Schools boss Bill Hite , please take a bow. Bart Blatstein (it's YOUR Tower now)
ENTERTAINMENT
March 18, 2011 | By HOWARD GENSLER, gensleh@phillynews.com 215-854-5678
Brad Furman had a dilemma. His low-budget indie debut, "The Take," starring John Leguizamo, had received good reviews and positive buzz at the Toronto International Film Festival, and Furman was being considered a director on the rise. After years directing shorts and music videos and working behind-the-scenes for Julia Roberts, he didn't want to make a bad decision on his follow-up project. "I was struggling not to make the wrong choice," Furman said this week by phone from Los Angeles.
NEWS
November 28, 2008 | By Harris M. Steinberg
With the recent news that the Kimmel Center for the Performing Arts has hired a local architectural firm to reimagine its public spaces, there is reason to be hopeful. After all, how often do we get a mulligan on a $235 million project that's less than seven years old? The hiring of KieranTimberlake Associates is a good move for a building that has been fraught with problems from Day One. Started modestly as a new home for the Philadelphia Orchestra, the concert hall originally planned for the Kimmel site was designed by the world-renowned, Philadelphia-based architects Robert Venturi and Denise Scott Brown.
NEWS
November 6, 2008 | By GARY THOMPSON, thompsg@phillynews.com
Charlie Kaufman's "Synecdoche, New York" turns out to be just as off-putting and as baffling as its title. It's the long, labored story of Caden Cotard (Philip Seymour Hoffman), a director of regional theater whom we meet as he's about to lose his restless, painter wife (Catherine Keener). At couples therapy, she confesses that she fantasizes about his death, and when she goes to Europe for a two-week exhibition, it turns into a year and a divorce, leaving a bereft Cotard to mope in Schenectady.
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