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Sightseeing

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SPORTS
November 23, 1994 | by John Smallwood, Daily News Sports Writer
When Villanova coach Steve Lappas accepted the invitation for his team to play in the Great Alaska Shootout, he saw it not only as an opportunity for his Wildcats to play against top-level competition, but also for them to experience the wonder of the 49th state. That's why between practice sessions, the Wildcats were scheduled to visit some attractions. But in Alaska in November, timing is everything, and the timing of this trip wasn't conducive for sightseeing. The last days of a near-record snowfall canceled most of the extracurricular activities the Wildcats had planned for earlier in the week, and, with the Shootout tipping off tonight, sightseeing is no longer an issue for the 'Cats.
NEWS
February 28, 1999 | By Donald D. Groff, FOR THE INQUIRER
For years Europe has had tour bus companies that haul visitors around the continent for a single fare that includes sightseeing services and off-and-on privileges, but it's a concept mostly foreign to the United States - until now. Starting next month, a new company called AmeriBus plans to introduce a coach travel and tour service on three U.S. routes. If it works, it will give domestic and foreign travelers an economical alternative to other forms of touring in this country. Ameribus, based in Hollywood, Fla., will offer flat-fee fares for each route that allow riders to disembark in a city and catch another bus days later to continue their journey along the designated route.
NEWS
January 26, 1999 | MICHAEL MALLY / Inquirer Staff Photographer
From the shelter of the Liberty Bell pavilion, two tourists from Boston plan their itinerary during a drizzly day in Philadelphia. Today should be better for sightseeing, with more sunshine and cooler temperatures.
NEWS
May 21, 1993 | By Richard V. Sabatini, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A decision to go sightseeing in Philadelphia cost a Des Moines, Iowa, couple about $75,000 and lots of hard work. Police said that's what Mary Lou Weilbrenner, 61, and her husband, Spencer, 66, lost this week in Bensalem Township when a box trailer containing handmade jewelry that they sold at trade shows was stolen outside a motel on U.S. Route 1. The loss brought Mary Lou Weilbrenner, a retired art teacher who designed and made all of...
NEWS
July 2, 2000 | By Doug Lansky, FOR THE INQUIRER
Anyone who's ever been sightseeing knows that these days it's no longer good enough to just see the sight. You have to capture the image, take it home with you, get it developed, then try to figure out what your little finger is doing on top of the Eiffel Tower. For the last decade or so, tourists and their cameras have been as inseparable as yuppies and their humidors, whether they spring for a $10,000 set-up with a lens the size of Arizona or a $15 disposable number with an attached rubber band so they can wear the thing fashionably on their wrist.
NEWS
March 20, 1988 | By Steve Birnbaum, Special to The Inquirer
I'm taking my boys to Washington. Are there any books that would have an itinerary for a kids' trip to that city? One helpful book, easy to read or scan, is Going Places With Children in Washington, published by Green Acres School in Rockville, Md. There are several pages of information sources and phone numbers, followed by a suggested three-day itinerary for families with children. The bulk of the book is devoted to descriptions of the myriad sightseeing attractions that Washington has to offer, along with pertinent information for visiting them.
NEWS
July 19, 1987 | By Maria Archangelo, Inquirer Staff Writer
For the Hoffer family, each sailing of the Miss Northeast is a victory at sea. "We have had to overcome so many obstacles to finally own this boat and find a place to dock it," said co-owner Nancy Hoffer. "We wanted a place where we could take people out on the Delaware in the Northeast section of the city, so they wouldn't always have to go downtown. " The Hoffer family wanted to dock its boat at the Linden Avenue docks that are owned by the city, but they spent two years trying to get permission.
NEWS
August 26, 1990 | By Donald D. Groff, Special to The Inquirer
My daughter will be attending the University of Melbourne next year and we would like to visit her there. Should we consider trips to San Francisco and Hawaii on the way? - N.R., West Chester A typical ticket from the East Coast to Australia includes stopovers, if you want them, in California, Hawaii, Fiji or Tahiti, perhaps New Zealand and sometimes Hawaii on your return trip. It's a long trip by any standard, and stopovers help the body adjust; if you have the time, you ought to take advantage of them.
NEWS
September 25, 1988 | By John Ellis, Special to The Inquirer
The battle that was expected in the men's 400-meter individual medley never materialized. Tamas Darnyi finished in a world-record time of 4:14.75, almost three seconds ahead of Warminster's David Wharton. The Hungarian swam the race of his life, and Wharton had to settle for the silver medal. Still, second in the world is nothing to laugh at, and Wharton is proud of his performance - and so are his parents. "The whole day was very exciting," his mother, Nancy, said in a telephone interview Wednesday night from Seoul.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 27, 2015 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
KURORT RATHEN, Germany - Even on days when the Philadelphia Orchestra doesn't have to move around Europe, some rogue contingent does so anyway, popping over to some neighboring city to meet an old teacher, or, more ambitiously, going in search of the Grand Budapest Hotel. The actual hotel exterior in the super-scenic, Oscar-winning film of that name was a made-for-studio model, obviously not to be found in quaint Kurort Rathen, a half-hour's train ride from Dresden. But the film was shot in the Saxony region, one of whose most spectacular outdoor locations is the bizarrely gnarled sandstone mountains overlooking an ex-duchy known as Königstein.
SPORTS
October 8, 2013 | BY MARK PERNER, Daily News Staff Writer pernerm@phillynews.com
AS A NATIVE of Manchester, England - Mancunians, they call us - I felt a responsibility to provide anyone going to my place of birth to catch the Sixers play the Thunder tomorrow with sightseeing tips. Since I have only visited Manchester on so very few occasions over the past soooooo many years, I recruited my childhood pal, Ian Goldstone, who just so happens to be a limo driver in Manchester, to be our tour guide. Of course being a Manchester City football fan, Ian highly recommends that you check out Etihad Stadium, home of the boys in blue.
NEWS
July 10, 2010 | By WILLIAM BENDER & REGINA MEDINA, benderw@phillynews.com 215-854-5255
THEY TOUCHED down at JFK Airport about 2 p.m. on July 2 to begin their "American adventure," eager to learn all they could about our culture before returning to Hungary in three weeks. Among the items on their packed itinerary was a trip to Nyack, N.Y., where the group of 13 students and two teachers was scheduled to go rowing on the Hudson River. Instead, they were thrown into the Delaware River Wednesday afternoon, when a 250-foot sludge barge owned by the city plowed over an amphibious sightseeing boat that had stalled.
NEWS
July 9, 2010 | By Melissa Dribben, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The first seconds underwater seemed "like forever" to Ruby Grace. "It was cold and looked kind of blurry, but I could see the light, so that was good. " The 9-year-old from suburban St. Louis swam to the surface and looked around frantically for her father. Kevin Grace was right beside her. Just before the boat had reared up and tipped, he tried to shove a life preserver over her head and hold on to her. But in the churning river, she slipped from his grip and went under. He reached down and grabbed her hair.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 22, 2010 | By Robert Strauss FOR THE INQUIRER
West Chester is a city with just enough distance from Philadelphia to establish its own identity and individuality. As the Chester County seat it has a congenial mix - the home of West Chester University and an area where entrepreneurs, restaurateurs and shop owners have banded together to survive. That mix, combined with some offbeat attractions, both around the central business district along Gay Street and beyond, makes West Chester a fun destination for a day trip. Here are some suggestions: Helicopter Museum Adjacent to West Chester Airport, the American Helicopter Museum & Education Center is a thrill-pilot's dream.
SPORTS
June 23, 2007 | By Rick O'Brien INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
On the 15-minute bus ride from City Hall to the Liberty Bell Center, Emily Friedman worked on breaking down the communication barrier with the Chinese national softball team. Friedman, a second baseman for the Philadelphia Force, compared arm muscles with the player seated next to her, sampled a Chinese snack food, and made a serious effort to correctly pronounce the names of a few players, including Mi Renrong and Tan Ying. "It's a bit difficult because of the language barrier," Friedman, 23, said.
NEWS
August 27, 2006 | By Howard Shapiro INQUIRER TRAVEL EDITOR
During his entire 22 years as a tour guide in New Orleans, no one ever asked Stanley Bergeron to go into the Ninth Ward, where many of the poorest residents of the city lived. Or Chalmette, or Gentilly, or Lakeview. Those neighborhoods are not the New Orleans that brought in about 10 million people a year for carefree crawling in a legendary historic quarter where tourists amble with open drinks in their hands. These neighborhoods are where people bedded down at night, every night of their residential lives.
BUSINESS
July 29, 2005 | By Patricia Horn INQUIRER BUSINESS WRITER
Salvador Dal? was always known for his flair for making money. Philadelphia just got a whiff of it. The retrospective of Dal?'s works held at the Philadelphia Museum of Art from Feb. 16 through May 30 boosted the region's economy by nearly $55 million, according to an analysis of the exhibit's financial side by Urban Partners, an economic development consulting firm in Philadelphia. The exhibit created the equivalent of 830 full-time jobs, sold more than 20,700 hotel rooms, and added $4.46 million in city and state tax revenue, the study said.
NEWS
June 11, 2005 | By Marcia Gelbart INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Attention tourists: There's something new in the water - and it's not a duck. Nor a frog. Nor a hippo. Philadelphia's newest land-to-sea sight-seeing vessel is (drum-roll, please) . . . a shark. A landshark, to be specific. "It's a smiley shark," said Michael Kates, director of operations for Philadelphia Trolley Works. After years as a major city tour operator - its fleet includes more than 35 trolleys and 25 horse-drawn carriages - the local company is taking its business to the Delaware River.
NEWS
January 23, 2005 | By Kay Rosier FOR THE INQUIRER
At first I wasn't sure I'd survive. After only four years of schooling in Spanish 50 years ago, I had decided it was time to get serious about the language. Although over the years I had traveled briefly in six Spanish-speaking countries and had a modest language ability, I was by no means fluent. A tip in the travel section led me to an intermediate/advanced total-immersion program in Oaxaca, Mexico, under the enthusiastic direction of Ronda Calef, a talented teacher and owner of Weekend en Espa?ol, a Spanish-language school in San Francisco.
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