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Sign Language

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NEWS
December 11, 1987 | By ROSE DeWOLF, Daily News Staff Writer
When a deaf child tells Santa Claus what he or she wants for Christmas, Santa has to read what the child is saying in sign language - and be able to respond in sign language too. And where can you find a Santa who knows sign- language? At the Montgomery Mall on Saturday mornings. This Santa can and does talk to any child - those who can hear, those who can't, those who talk, those who sign. This Santa sometimes goes by the name of Hank Fox, a Prudential insurance agent from Warminster.
NEWS
December 2, 2010
EVEN AFTER the mayor backtracked yesterday, it's hard to imagine a dumber move than trying to take the "Christmas" out of the Christmas Village market at Dilworth Plaza - at least once it was already there. Anyone who knows about the cable-TV/talk- radio crusade against an alleged secular-Jewish-Muslim-atheist "War on Christmas" could have told Managing Director Richard Negrin that the picture of workers removing the word "Christmas" from the sign was guaranteed to go viral. And so it did, stirring up an unnecessary controversy wrapped up in lots of misunderstanding and divisiveness.
NEWS
January 24, 2014 | BY JENNY DeHUFF, Daily News Staff Writer dehuffj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5218
JUST LIKE PRESIDENT Obama and former New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg, Mayor Nutter was joined by a sign-language interpreter during his last two news conferences, but the question remains: Is he here to stay? Everett Gillison, Nutter's deputy mayor for public safety and chief of staff, told the Daily News that having a sign-language interpreter was important during severe-weather events to better inform the public. "This is not the first time that we have used an interpreter," Gillison said.
NEWS
February 12, 2014 | By Michael Boren, Inquirer Staff Writer
MEDFORD A Burlington County nursing facility says it will offer a certified sign-language interpreter to deaf patients after a complaint alleging that one of its patients was often denied that resource. The decision is part of a settlement announced Monday involving the Medford Care Center. In 2012, the family of Mary Jane Barton, a former patient who is deaf, alleged that the facility offered a sign-language interpreter only twice and based other conversations on lip reading and handwritten notes.
NEWS
September 30, 1987 | By Charlotte Kidd, Special to The Inquirer
High-tech jargon - hard enough to understand even after close listening - poses special problems for Gary Behm. So Behm is tackling the task in a special way. He's helping to devise a new language. Behm, 31, is an IBM engineer and specializes in manufacturing systems engineering (MSE) at Lehigh University. He has also been deaf since birth, and out of necessity, he and translator Nancy Abreu are creating new sign language for advanced technology, a career area few deaf people have explored.
NEWS
October 20, 1995 | by Earni Young, Daily News Staff Writer
In the '60s, angry and frustrated homeowners packed Philadelphia Commission on Human Relations hearings to complain about "blockbusting. " That's the practice of real-estate firms' papering neighborhoods with "For Sale" and "SOLD" signs to panic whites, afraid of racial change, into selling cheap. After hundreds of complaints and several lawsuits, the commission in 1970 persuaded City Council to approve an ordinance banning "SOLD" signs on residential properties and requiring "For Sale" signs to be removed within seven days after the agreement of sale is signed.
NEWS
March 14, 1991 | By Sandra Sardella, Special to The Inquirer
Educators at Camden County College are seeking approval for a sign-language program that would enable students to obtain an associate's degree in interpreter education. Officials for the New Jersey Board of Higher Education are expected to make a decision tomorrow. If the program is approved, it will become the second of its kind in the state. Union County College in Cranford is currently the only school to offer a degree in sign language. "There is a tremendous shortage of interpreters in this area, and interpreting for the hearing impaired is really an emerging profession," said program director Robert Kaczorowski, who also is dean of liberal arts and social service careers.
NEWS
March 4, 2013
* SWITCHED AT BIRTH. 8 p.m. Monday, ABC Family.   WARNING: The commercials may seem louder during ABC Family's "Switched at Birth" this week. That's because most of the episode will be in American Sign Language. (There will be subtitles.) Now in its second season, the show about two teens - one deaf, Daphne (Katie Leclerc), and one hearing, Bay (Vanessa Marano) - who were accidentally raised by one another's biological families has intensified its focus on the deaf community.
NEWS
November 11, 1993 | By Laurent Sacharoff, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Perhaps it's his status as a starter on the boys' soccer team. Definitely, sixth grader Matt Kochie has a lot of friends in town. Whichever, his transfer this fall to Samuel M. Ridgway from the Marie Katzenbach School for the Deaf in Trenton had an interesting side effect: More than 50 students tried to get into the middle school's sign-language class. About 25, all fellow sixth graders, eventually were allowed to enroll. "The other kids see he's not handicapped, that he gets out there and plays an excellent game of soccer," said Glenn Edwards, a math teacher at Ridgway and a girls' soccer coach, "and it carries right over to the school system.
NEWS
April 5, 1994 | By Gloria A. Hoffner, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Whirling and twirling like a flower in the wind, Kalin Morrell danced across the floor of her kindergarten classroom to the music of "Be Our Guest. " Joining her were seven other 5- and 6-year-olds, each following in the footsteps of dance teacher Beth Ann Finisdore. A special guest instructor visiting the Wallingford-Swarthmore kindergarten center on Wednesday, Finisdore shared not only a love of movement with her students, but also the disability of being hearing-impaired. "I'm severely to profoundly deaf, but my parents believed in my being exposed to music, dance and sports," Finisdore said.
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NEWS
June 15, 2015 | By Francesca Serritella, For The Inquirer
As a bridesmaid at a bachelorette party, you are part dance partner and part security guard to the bride-to-be. You want the bachelorette to have a VIP experience, and you are the velvet rope. But in order to do that, you have to master the art of bar sign language. Last weekend, 10 friends and I celebrated my BFF's bachelorette party at a beachside bar. On the dance floor, we formed a protective circle around the bride-to-be, ready to wrangle, distract, and, if need be, repel incoming males.
NEWS
May 4, 2014 | By Matt Breen, Inquirer Staff Writer
The third quarter ended, and Washington boys' lacrosse coach Jack Creighton turned toward his bench in search of his starting goalie. Robert Franklin sat there alone, with ice on one of his shins. Creighton asked him to walk onto the field. The coach did not need Franklin to reenter the game. "Need you to sign for me, please," Creighton said. Franklin's replacement, sophomore Paul Thiergartner, is deaf. And the Eagles coach wanted to give him instructions before the fourth quarter began.
NEWS
February 12, 2014 | By Michael Boren, Inquirer Staff Writer
MEDFORD A Burlington County nursing facility says it will offer a certified sign-language interpreter to deaf patients after a complaint alleging that one of its patients was often denied that resource. The decision is part of a settlement announced Monday involving the Medford Care Center. In 2012, the family of Mary Jane Barton, a former patient who is deaf, alleged that the facility offered a sign-language interpreter only twice and based other conversations on lip reading and handwritten notes.
NEWS
January 24, 2014 | BY JENNY DeHUFF, Daily News Staff Writer dehuffj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5218
JUST LIKE PRESIDENT Obama and former New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg, Mayor Nutter was joined by a sign-language interpreter during his last two news conferences, but the question remains: Is he here to stay? Everett Gillison, Nutter's deputy mayor for public safety and chief of staff, told the Daily News that having a sign-language interpreter was important during severe-weather events to better inform the public. "This is not the first time that we have used an interpreter," Gillison said.
NEWS
August 29, 2013
BEFORE the first speech was uttered on the National Mall on Saturday, marchers from all over America commemorating the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom had already spelled out their demands in signs. They marched behind banners and placards calling for increased education spending, an end to discriminatory voting restrictions and for more and better jobs. Fifty years after the 1963 March on Washington, those are still signs of the times. The commemorations staged Saturday and again with today's presidential speech were and will be fueled by the same determination that marked the original march.
NEWS
March 4, 2013
* SWITCHED AT BIRTH. 8 p.m. Monday, ABC Family.   WARNING: The commercials may seem louder during ABC Family's "Switched at Birth" this week. That's because most of the episode will be in American Sign Language. (There will be subtitles.) Now in its second season, the show about two teens - one deaf, Daphne (Katie Leclerc), and one hearing, Bay (Vanessa Marano) - who were accidentally raised by one another's biological families has intensified its focus on the deaf community.
NEWS
February 1, 2013 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
LaNieta "Niety" Garbutt, 69, of Abington, a sign-language interpreter in Montgomery County schools, died Thursday, Jan. 24, of pancreatic cancer at her home. Mrs. Garbutt spent 27 years as a sign-language interpreter for the Montgomery County Intermediate Unit. She was so popular with deaf students and her teaching colleagues that they turned out in droves to her signed memorial service Monday, Jan. 28. "She gave generously of her time and herself to the many deaf students for whom she was an interpreter," her family said.
NEWS
December 21, 2012
* PROJECT NIM. 9 p.m. Thursday, HBO. IF NIM Chimpsky were alive today and his life had gone a little differently, he might have his own raucous "reality" show on MTV instead of just the occasional appearance on "Sesame Street. " Maybe even a clothing line. And thanks to the American Humane Association's production guidelines, he'd likely have a saner life than he did at the hands of the people who, in the name of science, took a baby chimpanzee from his mother to be raised like a human child, taught him to speak in sign language - and to smoke pot - and then passed him along like an outgrown toy. That, at least, was what I took away from "Project Nim," a fascinating, infuriating 2011 documentary about a sloppily run 1970s experiment that makes its television debut on HBO Thursday.
NEWS
November 23, 2012 | BY JAN RANSOM, Daily News Staff Writer ransomj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5218
IT'S BEEN ROUGH going for Hubert Washington. He served two tours in Iraq, has struggled with post-traumatic stress disorder and drug addiction, and last year celebrated Thanksgiving in jail for possession of a firearm. But Thursday morning, Washington, 29, stood at a lectern before a crowd that gathered for Project HOME's 21st annual Thanksgiving Day service at its headquarters, on Fairmount Avenue near 15th Street, and shared reasons why he's thankful. "I'm thankful to be alive, for having a roof over my head, for people that care about me," Washington said.
NEWS
November 3, 2012 | By Sam Wood, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
An international team of researchers is claiming that a captive 22-year-old elephant in a South Korean zoo can speak . Granted, Koshik the elephant doesn't have a large vocabulary. But scientists have confirmed that the 5.5-ton behemoth can imitate five Korean words by speaking through his trunk. Koshik can say "annyong" ("hello"), "anja" ("sit down"), "aniya" ("no"), "nuo" ("lie down"), and "choah" ("good"). (Don't think that's much? Well, how much Korean can you speak?
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