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Signage

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NEWS
July 30, 1987 | By FRANK DOUGHERTY, Daily News Staff Writer
Sid F. Gitterman, the man with nine natural funny faces, is wearing a frown. "This is no laughing matter," said Gitterman, referring to missing street signs at 4th and Vine. "It's a comedy of errors that isn't funny at all. " In May, Gitterman's family opened SUJi designs, an upscale dress distribution firm in an Old City warehouse at 408 Vine St. "Very old warehouse, too - it was built in 1873," quipped Gitterman. But the street identification signs down the block read 4th Street and York Avenue.
NEWS
June 19, 1986 | By Theresa Conroy, Special to The Inquirer
The Plymouth Township Zoning Hearing Board has approved the Avellino's Tire & Auto Centers Inc.'s request to install an additional 111 square feet of illuminated signs on its property at 500 S. Gravers Rd. At a hearing Monday night, the board voted unanimously to grant a special exception permitting the signs to measure 68 square feet more than that allowed by township zoning laws. The company will now have a total of 368 square feet of signage on its property. In handing down its decision, however, the zoning board required the company to turn off signs at 11 p.m. each night, zoning board member Joanna Sica said.
NEWS
July 18, 2014 | BY SEAN COLLINS WALSH, Daily News Staff Writer walshSE@phillynews.com, 215-854-4172
FOLLOWING through on regulations passed after last year's deadly building collapse on Market Street, Mayor Nutter yesterday unveiled new signage requirements for demolition and construction sites to make it easier for residents to alert the city about unsafe projects. For buildings three stories or higher, contractors must pay for a 3-by-5-foot sign showing a copy of the permit, a rendering of the project, its expected completion date, contact information for the owner and contractor, and instructions for reaching the city.
NEWS
March 22, 1994 | By Galina Espinoza, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
As if the Cherry Hill Mall wasn't enough, township residents will soon have a new shopping mecca to call their own. The Planning Board last night approved building the proposed $25 million, 382,000-square-foot Cherry Hill Town Center on an unused parking lot at Garden State Park. After two hours of discussion, board members voted to grant relief from township codes pertaining to open space, signage and loading docks. The developers, International Thoroughbred Breeders Inc., which owns the site, and Gale & Wentworth of Florham Park, asked that just 19 percent of the project be open space instead of the required 25 percent.
NEWS
March 26, 1995 | By Ty Tagami, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The township Planning Commission has approved what could become the first revisions to the local zoning ordinance since 1969, and has sent them on to the Township Council. The revision would allow builders to construct homes on smaller lots. In addition, developers could preserve open space in exchange for the right to build cluster housing. The proposal also would restrict commercial signage. The ordinance has traveled a twisting path through developer appeals and changes in the makeup of the council.
NEWS
June 25, 2010 | By DAN GERINGER, geringd@phillynews.com 215-854-5961
While cash-strapped public-transit systems in Connecticut, Miami and Chicago have talked about selling their stations' naming rights to private corporations, the SEPTA board went ahead and did it yesterday. The board unanimously approved a $5.4 million deal with AT&T to rename Pattison Avenue Station after the telecommunications giant. AT&T Station is scheduled to debut in August as the South Philly sports-complex gateway formerly known as Pattison Avenue Station. The board's approval was no surprise, given SEPTA's need for operating cash and the willingness of AT&T - the only wireless carrier that provides underground service in the subway system - to pay $3.4 million to the transit agency and $2 million to its ad agency, Titan Outdoor LLC, over the next five years.
NEWS
February 11, 1999 | BY ROBERT BERRYHILL
What is wrong with us? When will the public realize that any public entity is established for the public's use? All too often, the very entities created to serve us forget that we are the consumer. Just because there isn't any private competition, they decide on (or do not realize the importance of) having efficient, cost-effective programs.It's too bad that all government entities are monopolies for specific consumers. We need to remind ourselves that all such agencies are completely accountable to the public.
NEWS
June 17, 2010 | By DAN GERINGER, geringd@phillynews.com
Philadelphia sports fans and other Broad Street Line riders could be getting off at "AT&T Station" by August to attend events at the South Philly stadium complex. The SEPTA board is expected next week to approve a historic $5 million deal to rename Pattison Avenue station for the telecommunications giant. "Pattison Avenue station" will cease to exist on SEPTA signage and maps, although Pattison Avenue will remain Pattison Avenue and the Phillies' beloved catcher, Carlos Ruiz, will not change his name to "AT&T Presents Chooch!"
NEWS
October 22, 2004 | By Ira Porter INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
William Mulleney reclined in the front seat of his black van on Interstate 95 near Philadelphia International Airport the other night, waiting for his cell phone to ring with the word that relatives had arrived on their flight from Oklahoma. He had no idea he could have parked for free near the airport itself and avoided risking a traffic ticket. "That's why I'm waiting here," said Mulleney, of Smyrna, Del., as his vehicle idled on the shoulder of the ramp for about 45 minutes.
NEWS
July 21, 2004 | By Bill Rickett
Most of the thousands who drive Route 13 daily between Tullytown and Bensalem in Bucks County take little notice of the blighted, disaffected or unused structures that line much of the highway. Built for 1950s traffic, the corridor has become a dangerous, outdated and unattractive thoroughfare crying for help. The opportunity now exists to provide that help. The Route 13 Revitalization Plan, released in April, provides a blueprint for converting what many believe to be the most dangerous road in Bucks County into a model for enhancing community character while also improving safety and attracting economic development.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 18, 2014 | BY SEAN COLLINS WALSH, Daily News Staff Writer walshSE@phillynews.com, 215-854-4172
FOLLOWING through on regulations passed after last year's deadly building collapse on Market Street, Mayor Nutter yesterday unveiled new signage requirements for demolition and construction sites to make it easier for residents to alert the city about unsafe projects. For buildings three stories or higher, contractors must pay for a 3-by-5-foot sign showing a copy of the permit, a rendering of the project, its expected completion date, contact information for the owner and contractor, and instructions for reaching the city.
BUSINESS
January 10, 2013 | By Suzette Parmley, Inquirer Staff Writer
The high-ceilinged grand entrance to the expanded Convention Center at 111 N. Broad St. made its debut in spring 2011. Nearly two years later, it's still hard to tell. There's nothing to indicate that the building is, indeed, the Convention Center. To change that, the Convention Center Authority board is pushing to install digital signs above the three entrances facing North Broad Street. The signs could be changed for different events, such as the annual Philadelphia Auto and Flower Shows - the two largest draws every year - and could potentially generate revenue if the board decided to charge groups to use them to advertise their events at the center.
NEWS
June 25, 2010 | By DAN GERINGER, geringd@phillynews.com 215-854-5961
While cash-strapped public-transit systems in Connecticut, Miami and Chicago have talked about selling their stations' naming rights to private corporations, the SEPTA board went ahead and did it yesterday. The board unanimously approved a $5.4 million deal with AT&T to rename Pattison Avenue Station after the telecommunications giant. AT&T Station is scheduled to debut in August as the South Philly sports-complex gateway formerly known as Pattison Avenue Station. The board's approval was no surprise, given SEPTA's need for operating cash and the willingness of AT&T - the only wireless carrier that provides underground service in the subway system - to pay $3.4 million to the transit agency and $2 million to its ad agency, Titan Outdoor LLC, over the next five years.
NEWS
June 17, 2010 | By DAN GERINGER, geringd@phillynews.com
Philadelphia sports fans and other Broad Street Line riders could be getting off at "AT&T Station" by August to attend events at the South Philly stadium complex. The SEPTA board is expected next week to approve a historic $5 million deal to rename Pattison Avenue station for the telecommunications giant. "Pattison Avenue station" will cease to exist on SEPTA signage and maps, although Pattison Avenue will remain Pattison Avenue and the Phillies' beloved catcher, Carlos Ruiz, will not change his name to "AT&T Presents Chooch!"
NEWS
July 29, 2008 | By Jeff Hurvitz
While driving a taxi during my college years in the early 1970s, I would regularly take a temperature on new arrivals to our area. Invariably, upon driving from the airport, passengers would ask me to identify the letters PSFS and PNB that adorned the skyline. Upon being told that they were monikers for banking institutions, a tacit sign of approval was then met by: "Where's the best place to eat here?" and "How are those Phillies doing?" There were no major markers identifying our great institutions of higher education, our wonderful teaching hospitals or most of our major industries.
NEWS
October 22, 2004 | By Ira Porter INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
William Mulleney reclined in the front seat of his black van on Interstate 95 near Philadelphia International Airport the other night, waiting for his cell phone to ring with the word that relatives had arrived on their flight from Oklahoma. He had no idea he could have parked for free near the airport itself and avoided risking a traffic ticket. "That's why I'm waiting here," said Mulleney, of Smyrna, Del., as his vehicle idled on the shoulder of the ramp for about 45 minutes.
NEWS
July 21, 2004 | By Bill Rickett
Most of the thousands who drive Route 13 daily between Tullytown and Bensalem in Bucks County take little notice of the blighted, disaffected or unused structures that line much of the highway. Built for 1950s traffic, the corridor has become a dangerous, outdated and unattractive thoroughfare crying for help. The opportunity now exists to provide that help. The Route 13 Revitalization Plan, released in April, provides a blueprint for converting what many believe to be the most dangerous road in Bucks County into a model for enhancing community character while also improving safety and attracting economic development.
NEWS
February 11, 1999 | BY ROBERT BERRYHILL
What is wrong with us? When will the public realize that any public entity is established for the public's use? All too often, the very entities created to serve us forget that we are the consumer. Just because there isn't any private competition, they decide on (or do not realize the importance of) having efficient, cost-effective programs.It's too bad that all government entities are monopolies for specific consumers. We need to remind ourselves that all such agencies are completely accountable to the public.
NEWS
April 9, 1996 | By Lisa Kozleski, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
It's a small sign, really, and rather unassuming, except in its remarkable ability to provoke a quip, a smile, and lately, a fervent, old-fashioned debate. The crux of the controversy is a chalkboard display in front of Cabbages and Kings bookstore and the concern by some that it violates a new borough ordinance. The sign, bearing quotations of writers past and present, has incited the first public protest since the sidewalk-display and sign ordinances were adopted earlier this year.
NEWS
March 26, 1995 | By Ty Tagami, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The township Planning Commission has approved what could become the first revisions to the local zoning ordinance since 1969, and has sent them on to the Township Council. The revision would allow builders to construct homes on smaller lots. In addition, developers could preserve open space in exchange for the right to build cluster housing. The proposal also would restrict commercial signage. The ordinance has traveled a twisting path through developer appeals and changes in the makeup of the council.
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