CollectionsSilence
IN THE NEWS

Silence

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
September 22, 1990
When it comes to Center City's proposed special services district, no news was definitely good news this week. On Monday the deadline passed for property owners to object to paying a 4.5 percent property tax surcharge to fund extra cleaning and security for the city's commercial core, and only a relative handful said no. That means that this crucial program has surmounted its major hurdle and now needs only final City Council approval, which we...
ENTERTAINMENT
January 31, 2012
WHEN THE Oscar nominations were released last week, the silence was deafening. Three actors were nominated for saying virtually nothing - two for the silent movie "The Artist," and Max Von Sydow, who was anything but extremely loud in "Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close. " He plays a mute. Von Sydow was mum on the subject of his nomination, but issued a photostat of a handwritten note: "I don't know what to say. " Last year, everyone was talking about performers who didn't talk.
NEWS
June 29, 1994 | By Gail Stephanie Miles, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Led by their valedictorian, the 194 members of the senior class at Camden County Vocational-Technical School observed a moment of silence last night during the school's commencement exercises. The pause, which brought an automatic stillness to the crowd of several hundred, was called for by Loreli Liebermann shortly after she began to give her commencement address. It had been expressly forbidden by the vocational- technical school's Board of Education during a public meeting last month after Liebermann requested permission.
NEWS
September 7, 2002 | By Clea Benson INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Mayor Street is calling on Philadelphians to leave their offices and homes on Sept. 11, join hands and observe a citywide moment of silence. The observance, to take place at 10 a.m., will follow a memorial march organized by firefighters and police. "After Sept. 11, you saw total strangers on the street saying hello, holding doors for people," said Frank Keel, Street's spokesman. "The mayor's feeling was maybe if some of that spirit of brotherhood has subsided over the past year, maybe this kind of citywide bonding in silence and remembrance can rekindle some of that sense of goodwill and brotherhood.
NEWS
July 31, 1986
Andy Rooney's July 22 Op-ed Page column "Street musicians are not music to his ears" hit home. Once a street musician, I played the horn with classmates in front of Woolworths on Chestnut Street, near Broad Street. We were students of the Philadelphia College of the Performing Arts, and we needed the extra money. At $10 each per hour, I couldn't think of a better way to spend my free class periods. But today, after seven years of studying to be a priest, I find that silence is a friend I see too seldom.
NEWS
July 31, 2008
WHY COULDN'T Page 1 Sexy Single Nefertiti Jaquez (as beautiful as she is) list an e-mail address like everyone else did? Not even an account set up just to see the public reaction? You are a truly blessed, gorgeous woman. But you're shedding light as to why you may still be single! Ken Belneau, Philadelphia
NEWS
March 11, 2002
THE MANNER in which Navy SEAL Neil Roberts died last week and the response to it reveals a lot more about the international community and the press than meets the eye. What is noticeably present in the reaction to this incident is the unmistakable sound of silence. On March 12, Mr. Roberts was seen on video being dragged away after falling from a helicopter that was under attack by enemy soldiers in Afghanistan. He was later found to be shot to death. Where is the outrage over this flagrant and wanton disregard of the Geneva Convention?
NEWS
November 4, 1996
A year ago next Sunday, Ken Saro-Wiwa and eight other human-rights activists were hanged in Nigeria for nothing more than peaceful protest against the decades-long practice of usurping and making uninhabitable private lands in the government-sponsored pursuit of oil. A year later, the Nigerian government continues to abuse its citizens' rights. Those who speak out risk imprisonment and death. Other than the release of a few political prisoners, the bulk of Nigeria's civic leaders, environmentalists and well-known government critics remain behind bars.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
May 3, 2015 | By Katherine K. Dahlsgaard, For The Inquirer
A set of young twins entered my office as though they were there to be executed - silent and grim-faced. In fact, they were there merely for a psychological evaluation. And my office is bright and filled with toys - hardly a dungeon. Nonetheless, their mother had to drag them in. I couldn't make them laugh, smile, answer my questions - or even look at me. Their mother explained their strange silence was the main reason she had brought her twins to the appointment. Although they were "chatterboxes" at home, talking easily to both parents, other family members, and each other, they had never talked at their elementary school.
SPORTS
May 1, 2015 | By Mike Sielski, Inquirer Columnist
BALTIMORE - Everything was so clear and sharp: the crack of the bat, the thwock of the ball into the catcher's mitt, the clip-clop of cleats against a dugout's concrete steps and floor. Every noise had an easily identifiable source. You could hear a photographer's camera click and know exactly where he was positioned. You could hear an infielder call for a pop-up and feel as if you, too, should peel off and let him take it. You could see a home run cut through the sky, clear the right-field bleachers, land on a city street . . . and hear nothing in the aftermath.
SPORTS
April 21, 2015 | BY JOHN SMALLWOOD, Daily News Staff Writer smallwj@phillynews.com
WASHINGTON, D.C. - Considering that Stephen Strasburg had struggled in his first two starts, the Washington Nationals righthander could not have picked a better opponent than the Phillies to shake the early doldrums. In 11 career starts against the Phillies, Strasburg was 4-1 with a 2.09 ERA. He had 82 strikeouts in 69 innings. Last season, Strasburg was 2-0 with a 1.42 in five starts against the Phillies with the Nationals going 4-1 in those games. So when Strasburg started yesterday's game at Nationals Park by setting the Phillies down on eight pitches in a 1-2-3 first inning, he had to be feeling good about the way things were headed.
NEWS
April 16, 2015 | Inquirer Editorial Board
Government secrecy can be revealing in that officials who avoid the public usually have something to hide. The suppression of information about the deaths of New Jersey political insider John Sheridan and his wife, Joyce, seems to have been just that sort of telling silence. The Sheridans' sons this week raised more questions about the Somerset County Prosecutor's Office's investigation of the deaths and its conclusion last month that John Sheridan, the CEO of Cooper Health System and a former cabinet member, killed his wife and then himself.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 26, 2015 | By Howard Gensler
IT'S BEEN nearly 33 years since Mumia Abu-Jamal was convicted of murdering police officer Daniel Faulkner , and although the case has been a hot-button issue because of the trial's fairness and death-penalty sentence, it has come to the fore again in one of the most unlikely places: "The Voice. " As Nick Vadala reported on Philly.com, Philadelphia street performer Anthony Riley has left the show, despite an amazing chair-turning audition that landed him Pharrell Williams as coach.
NEWS
January 29, 2015 | Inquirer Editorial Board
On a mild morning back in October, four New Jersey governors joined a host of dignitaries and hundreds of other mourners at a memorial service for political insider John Sheridan and his wife, Joyce, near the Statehouse in Trenton. Former Gov. Christie Whitman remembered Sheridan as an "indispensable adviser": "You could count on him. " Democratic mover George Norcross, who employed Sheridan as chief executive of Camden-based Cooper Health System, declared that "his legacy will continue.
NEWS
January 9, 2015
YESTERDAY I LOST four brothers - none of whom I'd ever met. Stephane Charbonnie; Jean Cabut, a/k/a "Cabu"; Georges Wolinski; and Bernard Verlhac, a/k/a "Tignous," were the cartoonists assassinated along with their journalism colleagues at the French satire magazine, Charlie Hebdo . "Charlie" was named after Charlie Brown, but it is related more closely to The Onion or Mad magazine than the Peanuts comic strip. It certainly could not be confused with straight newspapers, like the New York Times . But, when it came time to defend free speech after the infamous Danish cartoons about Muhammad were published in 2005, Charlie Hebdo ran the cartoons, while the New York Times refrained, primly telling readers that they were essentially "gratuitous assaults.
NEWS
November 26, 2014
REGARDING your article "GOP-led House report debunks Benghazi allegations," let's hope the truth will finally silence right-wing conspiracy zealots. After the tragic 2012 attack on our embassy, Republican leaders could have joined their fellow Americans in uniting behind the cause of finding the killers and seeking justice. Instead, they wasted millions of taxpayer dollars attempting to blame the deaths on the CIA, U.S. military and Obama administration officials. Seven prior investigations that rebuked their allegations weren't enough to silence Fox News, Limbaugh, Hannity and other fake-news sources.
NEWS
November 26, 2014 | By Julia Terruso, Tricia L. Nadolny, and Mike Newall, Inquirer Staff Writers
Protesters shouted in anger while others pleaded for calm Monday night at Philadelphia City Hall after learning of a Missouri grand jury's decision not to indict Police Officer Darren Wilson for the shooting death of Michael Brown. In anticipation of the announcement, Police Commissioner Charles H. Ramsey said he had officers "standing by" to assist with what he expected to be "peaceful rallies. " Demonstrators began after 8 p.m. to gather at City Hall, where police had already assembled en masse and where ice skaters were enjoying the new rink at Dilworth Park.
NEWS
October 28, 2014 | Inquirer Editorial Board
New Jersey political fixture John Sheridan and his wife, Joyce, died a month ago today as emergency workers fought a deliberately set fire in their home and tried to revive the couple. And yet almost as little is known about who or what killed them now as on the morning of Sept. 28. Especially in light of Sheridan's long-standing prominence as chief executive of Camden-based Cooper University Health System and a onetime member of New Jersey's cabinet, the dearth of information about his death is remarkable and disturbing.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|