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NEWS
April 7, 2006 | By Steve Ferry
Sometimes, I hate being an adult. I long for the days of having to hold hands crossing streets, being lifted up to water fountains to get a sip, or having my name stitched into my coat so I'd take the right one when leaving school. Life seemed simpler then. There were no worries, unless it was trying to decide which show to watch on TV or what cereal to eat for breakfast (the one with the best toy in the box, of course). Where have those days - anxiety-free, stress-free, care-free - gone?
LIVING
August 1, 1997 | By Paddy Noyes, FOR THE INQUIRER
Watching a handful of beads roll from his hands, and pulling blades of grass to see them taken away by the wind are some of the simple pleasures that fill 10-year-old Jeffrey's world. Jeffrey has autism and often seems self-absorbed. Yet, despite his challenges, Jeffrey learned many life skills. With supervision, he can dress, feed and bathe himself, and brush his teeth. Jeffrey responds well to structure, repetition and direction. He knows to buckle up when he goes for a ride in the car. He also is learning to do chores like folding his clothes and setting the table.
NEWS
February 2, 1990 | By Paddy Noyes, Special to The Inquirer
Even though Jocelyn is only 17 months old, she shows every sign of someday becoming an efficient career woman. When she decides it's time to leave the house, she determinedly stations herself at the front door and says "bye-bye. " For her outing, she's wearing bangle bracelets and a baseball cap, with sunglasses perched upside-down on her nose, and her dimples are in fine working order. A handbag, which she keeps well-organized, is hanging from her shoulder. It usually contains scraps of paper, barrettes and her bottle of juice.
NEWS
July 29, 1987 | By Andy Rooney
People who think that those of us who enjoy following professional sports are simple-minded are right, of course. The time we spend watching or reading about sports might better be spent accomplishing something. We appreciate that those who don't follow sports are superior people. They're no doubt doing something while we're wasting our time having fun. I hate to think of all the time I've spent watching or reading about my favorite sports (in order of preference) - football, track, tennis, swimming, basketball, baseball, hockey and golf.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 24, 2011 | BY BETSY SHARKEY, Los Angeles Times
IT TAKES A special skill to make a film feel as soft and light as a summer breeze, and yet that is what French director Jean Becker accomplishes with "My Afternoons With Margueritte," a glimpse into the everyday of two ordinary lives. This little gem is all about the nature of chance encounters and how they can change us in unexpected ways. The one on which this story hangs begins on a park bench in a small village in the French countryside. It is a place patina-ed by the years, as are the two main characters, a fragile bird-thin woman named Margueritte (Gisele Casadesus)
NEWS
July 16, 1992 | By Catherine Quillman, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Chester County at the turn of the century was a paradise for sportsmen and sportswomen. There were plenty of spring-fed streams and creeks for trout fishing, and the open, rolling terrain crisscrossed with hedgerows that were natural attractions for pheasants and foxes . . . and hunters. For those who favored less solitary pursuits, there was baseball, the game that blossomed in Chester County and most other parts of America in the decades after the Civil War. How sports mirrored life in the county can be seen in a new exhibit titled, "Sports Legacy," which opens Saturday at the Chester County Historical Society, 225 N. High St., West Chester.
FOOD
April 18, 2001 | By Marilynn Marter INQUIRER FOOD WRITER
In Italy, people care about food. The whole culture revolves around food. You don't "grab" a cup of coffee in the morning. You go to a cafe . . . you sit down . . . and you sip your morning coffee while you talk with your neighbors, even if only for 10 minutes. So says Sharon Sanders, author of Cooking Up an Italian Life (Pergola West, $26.95). "That's something we all can enjoy. It's like a minivacation," says Sanders, recalling the two years she lived in Italy.
NEWS
May 5, 1991 | Special to The Inquirer / JONATHAN WILSON
It's spring-training time for the Devon-Strafford Little League, which plays on Old State Road in Devon. Last weekend, the Cubs took on the Patriots. The eight-team league stresses the simple pleasures of smart baseball and having fun. All players are guaranteed an at-bat and two innings on the field in each game. "If you win," says Cubs coach Winthrop "Win" Clarke, "that's gravy. " (The Patriots took the gravy on this outing.)
FOOD
October 10, 1990 | By Bonnie Tandy Leblang and Carolyn Wyman, Special to the Daily News
Lender's Soft Bagels. $1.09 to $1.19 per 12.5-ounce bag of five, pre-sliced frozen bagels. Bonnie: Lender's has a winner with its new soft bagel. There are no objectionable ingredients - just ones you'd find in most breads. But those familiar with the crusty outside and soft inside of fresh-baked bagels may object to their softness. When choosing a bagel in place of bread, keep in mind that one bagel is approximately equivalent in calories, fat and sodium to three slices of bread.
FOOD
May 1, 1991 | by Bonnie Tandy Leblang and Carolyn Wyman, Special to the Daily News
SIMPLE PLEASURES FROZEN DAIRY DESSERT. Vanilla. $2.19 to $2.49 per pint. BONNIE: Simple Pleasures has added vanilla to its frozen confection line made with Simplesse, the first approved fat substitute. Simplesse is made from milk protein and egg whites that have been reformed into round particles that should fool your tongue into believing you are eating fat. Simplesse is considered safe. Although Simple Pleasures is fat-free, it is not without calories. A 4- ounce serving provides about 120 calories, about the same as in a 3-ounce serving of Haagen-Dazs' new yogurt.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 25, 2015 | By Jim Rutter, For The Inquirer
There's a certain type of American man who never changes and never disappears. Often overlooked, and even looked down upon, he nonetheless degrades himself in humiliating jobs to support his family while clinging to dreams of wealth and fame. On television, this man has appeared by many names: Al Bundy, Homer Simpson, Fred Flintstone, and Ralph Kramden. The latter finds life on stage as Scottie (Scott Greer) in 1812 Productions' To the Moon. Jen Childs and her creative team wrote To the Moon as an homage to the comedy style of Jackie Gleason, with Greer standing in for The Honeymooners star in a number of respects.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 24, 2011 | BY BETSY SHARKEY, Los Angeles Times
IT TAKES A special skill to make a film feel as soft and light as a summer breeze, and yet that is what French director Jean Becker accomplishes with "My Afternoons With Margueritte," a glimpse into the everyday of two ordinary lives. This little gem is all about the nature of chance encounters and how they can change us in unexpected ways. The one on which this story hangs begins on a park bench in a small village in the French countryside. It is a place patina-ed by the years, as are the two main characters, a fragile bird-thin woman named Margueritte (Gisele Casadesus)
NEWS
September 17, 2010
James P. "Jinx" Lake, 82, formerly of Drexel Hill, a top car salesman, died of cancer Tuesday, Sept. 14, at Brandywine Senior Living in Kennett Square. Mr. Lake was a salesman at McGowen Ford in Ardmore from 1952 to 1985 and then at Frankel Chevrolet, also in Ardmore, until retiring in 1997. He had generations of loyal customers, said a son, Brendan. At one point in the 1970s, he was selling 30 to 40 cars a month, his son said. The walls of his den were covered with award plaques, including for selling the most Ford Thunderbirds in the country for five years.
NEWS
June 21, 2010
RE YOUR June 14 editorial ( "It's Kind of a Done Deal" ): Saying that the sheriff and his office are "unnecessary" is to say democracy itself is unnecessary! The very things that make us the country we are with the form of government we enjoy are the checks and balances included in the Constitution and our City Charter that are designed to ensure a fair way to administer the law. The business of the sheriff's office is to execute law for the courts and carry out their judgments, be it serving writs and warrants, conducting sheriff's sales or prisoner transport and court security.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 13, 2010 | By Craig LaBan, Inquirer Restaurant Critic
The bentwood chairs at Mr. Martino's wobble and creak with various degrees of age and comfort. And though the staff is graciously patient with those who fuss and switch until they find the perfect seat, don't expect a decor makeover anytime soon at this South Philly classic. "We couldn't bring ourselves to buy new chairs," owner Marc Farnese said as he swapped out my chair for one that still had a back. "It just wouldn't feel right. " After 18-plus years inside this dimly lit haven of homey Italian cooking, a former 19th-century hardware store whose chestnut-paneled room is hung with antique paintings, lacy curtains, and old family photos, a few quirks are to be expected.
NEWS
May 18, 2007 | By Joseph A. Gambardello INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Anthony Edwards' family will bury him today. To the people of Philadelphia, he was homicide victim No. 142 of 2007. As such, it is easy to forget that he, like other victims of the city's murder epidemic, was more than a statistic; that his life, even in its ordinariness, had an impact. He was 49, and he was shot dead at lunchtime May 10 in West Oak Lane for the $60 he had in his pocket. Relatives - who do not want his life reduced to the hyphen between 1958 and 2007 - say he would have handed over the money without a fight.
NEWS
May 18, 2007 | By Joseph A. Gambardello INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Anthony Edwards' family will bury him today. To the people of Philadelphia, he was homicide victim No. 142 of 2007. It is easy to forget that he, like other victims of the city's murder epidemic, was more than a statistic; that his life, even in its ordinariness, had an impact. He was 49, and he was shot dead at lunchtime May 10 in West Oak Lane for the $60 he had in his pocket. Relatives - who do not want his life reduced to the hyphen between 1958 and 2007 - say he would have handed over the money without a fight.
NEWS
June 4, 2006 | By Michele Foy FOR THE INQUIRER
One of our family vacations was spent on a barrier island off the coast of southern North Carolina called Holden Beach. We had the pleasure of staying with friends. There were no amusement parks on the island, no miniature golf courses, and no noisy planes pulling banners across the sky. Although this is my idea of paradise, I thought my children would be bored. I was wrong. It was memorable for its simplicity. There was the beach, the ocean and quiet, dark nights. Our days were filled with collecting seashells on the beach, watching the shrimp boats come and go in the Intracoastal Waterway, and taking bike rides to explore the island with our children, Tommy, then 11, and Katie, then 8. The most important event of the day was identifying the objects we found on the beach.
NEWS
April 7, 2006 | By Steve Ferry
Sometimes, I hate being an adult. I long for the days of having to hold hands crossing streets, being lifted up to water fountains to get a sip, or having my name stitched into my coat so I'd take the right one when leaving school. Life seemed simpler then. There were no worries, unless it was trying to decide which show to watch on TV or what cereal to eat for breakfast (the one with the best toy in the box, of course). Where have those days - anxiety-free, stress-free, care-free - gone?
NEWS
December 17, 2002
The Inquirer asked readers to recall their holidays, sharing events that have remained the same over the years, and those that have changed. Here is what four residents had to say: After countless trips to Kiddie City, our living room looked like a toy store on Christmas morning during the years when our children were small. Their pleasure was real, but the glow faded after a while. When our 5-year-old, unwrapping her last present, wailed, "Is that all there is?" it was as if a light bulb flickered on. Is that all there is?
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