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Simpson

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NEWS
September 16, 1994 | BY SHAUN D. MULLEN The Los Angeles Daily News, Associated Press and Wall Street Journal contributed to this report
WHAT WOULD UNCLE WALT SAY? Turning away complaints that it would hinder the already dicey task of picking a jury in the real case, Walt Disney's Buena Vista Television unit is airing "Judge for Yourself: O.J. Simpson, Guilty or Innocent?" Disney brought together nine audience-member jurors, lawyers and "witnesses" and put the Juice on trial. "Witnesses" included feminist lawyer Gloria Allred, who thinks O.J. should get the hose because of his record of spousal abuse, and L.A. television personality Cyndy Garvey, a friend of Nicole's who worked through her grief by testifying about their final conversation.
BUSINESS
May 16, 1995 | By Rhonda Goodman, FOR THE INQUIRER
The Simpson Paper Co. will shut down its Whitemarsh Township plant Aug. 18 and lay off 272 employees, the company said yesterday. The move to close the Montgomery County facility was spurred by a need to save on operating costs and make better use of manufacturing capacity at Simpson's other sites, according to Diane L. Anderson-Stowe, a company executive. "The paper industry for the last five years has been extremely stressed, and everyone has been looking at the most cost-effective way to do business," Anderson-Stowe said.
NEWS
September 24, 2000 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
O.J. Simpson, former football great and celebrity crime suspect, has bought a five-bedroom, four-bath home in the Miami suburb of Kendall, the Miami Herald reported yesterday. The sellers were asking $625,000, but neither they nor the buyer would confirm Friday's sale price. The grounds include a swimming pool and a guest house. Also Friday, Simpson's former girlfriend Christie Prody reported to police that Simpson had burglarized her home. Simpson said she gave him a key and he did some laundry and took out the trash.
NEWS
June 24, 1994 | BY MIKE ROYKO
Only one issue interests me in the O.J. Simpson case: Is he or is he not a brutal, nightmarish murderer? Everything else is a lot of silly babble. We keep hearing that this is the "fall of an American hero. " Hero? O.J. Simpson was very good at running, especially clutching a football while being chased by 11 other players. He was paid handsomely because at both the college and professional level, the ability to run with a football sells tickets and increases TV viewership.
NEWS
December 20, 1999 | By Tom Infield, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
J. Robert Simpson, 78, a longtime activist against war and the death penalty, died Saturday at Martha House, a Catholic Worker Movement residence in the Germantown section of Philadelphia. Mr. Simpson, who at one time owned an engineering sales company in his hometown of Ambler, was involved in public demonstrations to call attention to myriad causes starting with opposition to the Vietnam War in the 1960s. A veteran of armed conflict himself - he was a pilot in World War II - he worked throughout the 1970s and '80s to block development of nuclear weapons, to help the homeless, and to end U.S. economic sanctions against Cuba.
NEWS
May 15, 1996 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
O.J. Simpson drew both laughs and jeers last night at his appearance before the Oxford Union debating society. Expectations had been high that the students would put Simpson under the toughest questioning since his acquittal on charges of murdering his ex-wife and her friend. He opened the one-hour session, which was closed to U.S. reporters, by decrying the "selective prosecution" of minorities. He also said that "America has lost all integrity in its media. " He said he had been comforted in jail by reading the Book of Job and made a passing reference to "getting into the Koran.
NEWS
October 27, 1994 | By LEON FRIEDMAN
During the past year more than 9,000 black men were arrested and charged with murder in the United States. One of those was O.J. Simpson. There is little question that Simpson will get as fair a trial as our system can offer. How will the courts treat the 8,999 other African American nobodies in comparison to Simpson? We cherish the notion that all citizens stand equal before the law. But Simpson is more equal than others accused of murders in at least five ways. First, he is not a nameless black face who would trigger society's unconscious fears about black men raping and pillaging - the stereotype that allows us to turn our backs on those accused of terrible crimes and to ignore all the unfair shortcuts that the system uses to send them away.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 22, 1994 | By Andy Wickstrom, FOR THE INQUIRER
Video, like other branches of the media, is in a marketing frenzy over the O.J. Simpson case. About a dozen tapes on Simpson and his troubles have been rushed into stores, some under the imprimatur of network news organizations and all playing off the sensational double murder of which he stands accused. But videotape now has an "instant publishing" rival from an even higher- tech plane: The People v. O.J. Simpson, an "interactive" casebook on the affair put together on CD-ROM for the computer crowd by Turner Home Entertainment.
LIVING
November 20, 1997 | By W. Speers This article contains material from the Associated Press, Reuters, Kansas City Star, New York Post, New York Daily News and USA Today
O.J. Simpson appeared Monday night on the pilot of a proposed TV talk show hosted by documentary filmmaker and author Michael Moore. They eased into chit-chat about football - Moore noting the "tight-fitting gloves" now worn by players - but once the 276 audience members got over the shock of the billed "surprise guest," there was visible squirming and a mini-rebellion. "You beat Nicole," one shouted. Another yelled: "Did you kill her?" When Moore asked how many believed Simpson was guilty, about 70 percent of hands went up. Simpson submitted to an audience Q&A, taking on all comers.
SPORTS
January 16, 1998 | By Raad Cawthon, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
O.J. Simpson has already shattered F. Scott Fitzgerald's credo that there are no second acts in American lives. Yesterday, Simpson had another of his ongoing days in court. This time it was in the court of public opinion as he sat for an hourlong live interview on the ESPN interview show Up Close. As he answered questions, Simpson, the former Heisman Trophy winner and NFL Hall of Famer who was found not guilty some 2 1/2 years ago of killing his wife, Nicole, and Ron Goldman, twice compared himself to the biblical Job while saying that a recent flurry of publicity, including an article in February's Esquire magazine, is not an attempt to rebuild the shattered celebrity of his life.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 16, 2015 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Shearer's 'Simpsons' shocker Doh! Harry Shearer , who voices some of our fave characters on The Simpsons - Ned Flanders, Principal Skinner, Kent Brockman, and Mr. Burns among them - has left Fox's animated masterpiece. It sounds like a bad breakup: The news comes via a terse announcement from exec producer James L. Brooks ' lawyer. (His lawyer?!). For his part, Shearer tweets, "I wanted what we've always had: the freedom to do other work. " Some critics say it's time the show, which has been renewed through the 28th season, should be put down.
NEWS
May 15, 2015 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Now, this is a cast! The O.J. Simpson story is coming (again) to a TV near you. But we're not talking about a new TV movie. Oh, no. Ryan Murphy , the guru behind Nip/Tuck , Glee , and American Horror Story , is making an entire series about Simpson's trial for the 1994 murder of his onetime soul mate, Nicole Brown . Simpson was acquitted. Called American Crime Story: The People v. O.J. Simpson , the FX drama will star Cuba Gooding Jr. as Simpson, Jordana Brewster as Brown, Courtney B. Vance as legal maestro Johnnie Cochran , John Travolta as that other legal maestro, Robert Shapiro, and Hellboy beauty Selma Blair as Kris Jenner . Huh?
NEWS
August 18, 2014 | By Julia Terruso, Inquirer Staff Writer
The reports come in - more than a dozen a week - in frantic phone calls or teary-eyed trips to the police station: My son is missing. My granddaughter never came home . He ran away again. Sgt. Janell Simpson spends every day at work investigating missing persons cases in Camden as head of the department's unit. She knocks on doors, passes out fliers, chases juveniles who don't want to be found, and, in extreme circumstances, crosses state lines to bring home abducted children.
SPORTS
June 6, 2014 | BY TOM MAHON, Daily News Staff Writer mahont@phillynews.com
T HE FLYERS LOGO just got Simpsonized. Mark Avery-Kenny, a designer at AK47 Studios, didn't let the fact that ratings for the animated TV series "The Simpsons" are at an all-time low deter him from incorporating characters from the show into some of the more recognizable logos from the NHL. And he did it just in time for the Stanley Cup finals, featuring the Los Angeles Kings against the New York Rangers. The Kings logo shows Fat Tony wearing a crown and holding a cigar. The Rangers logo depicts a smiling Lisa.
NEWS
July 27, 2013 | By Sandra Chereb, Associated Press
CARSON CITY, Nev. - O.J. Simpson went before a parole board and pleaded for leniency on his armed robbery and kidnapping sentence Thursday as he expressed regret for his actions and described being an upstanding inmate who earns pennies an hour keeping gym equipment sanitized and umpiring and coaching games in the prison yard. Simpson also said he has become a counselor of sorts to fellow inmates doing time for similar crimes and noted that he has made amends with his victims in a botched heist of memorabilia in a hotel room in Las Vegas in 2007.
SPORTS
July 16, 2013 | Associated Press
The list reads like a Who's Who among the world's best sprinters: Jamaican Asafa Powell, the former world-record holder at 100 meters. American champion Tyson Gay, who went out of his way to promote himself as an anti-drug athlete. Jamaican Sherone Simpson, who has a gold and two silver Olympic medals to her credit. Word came Sunday that all three had failed drug tests. "A sad day," one former track official called it - and certainly a day that punctured the myth that the oft-troubled sport has cleaned up its act. "I am not now - nor have I ever been - a cheat," Powell said in a message released through his Twitter account.
SPORTS
June 12, 2013 | By Tim McManus, Inquirer Staff Writer
When people approach Webb Simpson to talk about his victory in last year's U.S. Open, there's one thing, he said, that they inevitably ask. What did he think of the so-called "Bird Man," the fan who interrupted his trophy presentation on live television by stepping onto the green at San Francisco's Olympic and making loud bird calls? Now a year removed from the title, however, the other questions facing Simpson are getting more serious. The defending champion comes into Merion this week winless since last year's Open victory.
SPORTS
May 23, 2013 | By Joe Juliano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Webb Simpson has enjoyed success with a belly putter in his five seasons on the PGA Tour, posting three victories, including the 2012 U.S. Open. He doesn't want to see his style of anchored putting stroke thrown out. The U.S. Golf Association and the Royal and Ancient Golf Club of St. Andrews adopted a rule banning the anchored putting stroke, effective Jan. 1, 2016. Simpson doesn't agree with the decision and hopes the PGA Tour will continue to allow anchored putting, which would create a rule that is different from what the rest of the world will follow.
NEWS
May 19, 2013 | By Ken Ritter and Linda Deutsch, Associated Press
LAS VEGAS - The lawyer who defended O.J. Simpson on armed robbery charges delivered a potentially heavy blow to the former football star's bid for a new trial Friday, testifying that Simpson knew his buddies had guns when they went to a hotel room together to reclaim some sports memorabilia. Miami lawyer Yale Galanter took the stand at an often combative hearing on Simpson's claim that he was so badly represented by his attorney that his conviction should be thrown out. Point by point, Galanter contradicted much of his former client's testimony and strongly defended himself.
NEWS
May 16, 2013 | By Linda Deutsch and Ken Ritter, Associated Press
LAS VEGAS - His leg shackles rattling as he shuffled to the witness stand, a grayer, bulkier O.J. Simpson made his case for a new trial on armed-robbery charges Wednesday, saying he had been relying on the advice of his trusted attorney when he tried to reclaim mementos from his football glory days. After more than four years in prison, Simpson seized the opportunity to recount how he and some friends confronted two sports-memorabilia dealers in a Las Vegas hotel room in 2007, and how he believed he had the right to take back what he said had been stolen from him, including photos and footballs.
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