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Sinfonia Concertante

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NEWS
March 26, 1990 | By Lesley Valdes, Inquirer Music Critic
The Academy Chamber Players group gave its Home-Aid III concert to benefit the homeless yesterday at St. Mark's Church. Riccardo Muti and soprano Barbara Hendricks were the featured performers in the all-Mozart program, whose clear musical values were complemented by its social usefulness. It was heartening, then, to see the Center City church packed to capacity for the event, which Academy Chamber Players music director Barbara Govatos and executives at the Rohm & Haas Co. have so enthusiastically promoted these past seasons.
NEWS
April 10, 2012 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Culture Writer
William de Pasquale, 78, whose regal visage held a magnetic, four-decade presence at the front of the Philadelphia Orchestra's first violin section and who was a member of a remarkable family of string players, died Sunday at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital of complications relating to prostate cancer. Though Mr. de Pasquale slipped into various titles with the orchestra - associate concertmaster, acting concertmaster, second concertmaster, and co-concertmaster - the job for him always amounted to being Mr. Dependable.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 28, 1986 | By Daniel Webster, Inquirer Music Critic
Mozart and the great outdoors would seem to be uncomfortable together, yet the Philadelphia Orchestra's second week at the Mann Music Center turned into an intriguing survey of early Mozart works. Riccardo Muti was on the podium for all three concerts, devoting half of his second concert to a symphony and three arias and, last night, making a disputed Mozart work the center of his final program. Four wind soloists from the orchestra were featured in the Sinfonia Concertante (K. 297b)
NEWS
August 3, 1988 | By Lesley Valdes, Inquirer Music Critic
After a summer of obvious abstinence by many Mann Music Center contributors, the packed-to-capacity theater for the Philadelphia Orchestra last night was gratifying. Itzhak Perlman was the big draw; his partnership with longtime colleagues Pinchas Zukerman and Zubin Mehta further goldplated the annual tribute to the late Fredric R. Mann. The program, entirely Mozart, was nearly as balmful as the breezes that wafted overhead. It offered in good measure gentility, grace - and particularly in Perlman and Zukerman's account of the Sinfonia Concertante for Violin and Viola - serenity.
NEWS
October 13, 1988 | By Daniel Webster, Inquirer Music Critic
London's Academy of St. Martin-in-the-Fields built its early reputation by commercially exporting the scholarly insights into classical music that blossomed in England before they did in this country. Because of its success, the ensemble now can play in the United States for audiences trained in its own image and convinced of its cause. The chamber orchestra played Tuesday in Wilmington's Grand Opera House, offering clear, bright Mozart performances that combined vigor with a refined breadth of sonic qualities.
NEWS
October 3, 1988 | By Daniel Webster, Inquirer Music Critic
The New Jersey Symphony is taking on a firm musical profile under the direction of Hugh Wolff, but the question remains as to whether Wolff will give the ensemble more than a mere outline. The symphony played at the War Memorial Auditorium here Saturday during its opening series of concerts. In that program, Wolff's vigor in programming unusual and contemporary works with standard repertoire was plain, and that plan is in place for the remainder of his concerts with the symphony.
NEWS
November 5, 1991 | By Peter Dobrin, Special to The Inquirer
Blandness characterized most of the Concerto Soloists' concert Sunday afternoon at the Church of the Holy Trinity on Rittenhouse Square. Safe works were played safely, and with one exception, the experience seemed to leave both listener and performer unburdened by the adrenalin of a good challenge. That exception came with the first performance of Concerto for Contrabassoon by Daniel Dorff, a local composer who has studied with George Rochberg, George Crumb, Karel Husa, Richard Wernick and others.
NEWS
January 14, 1992 | By Peter Dobrin, Special to The Inquirer
Antonio Salieri these days has a lot less in common with Mozart than Michael Jackson. Or Madonna. Or 2 Live Crew, for that matter. His music is little like theirs, of course, but Salieri's career is remarkably similar to those of some of today's pop stars in one important way: It has been bolstered by controversy. Who ever heard of Salieri before Amadeus? Outside of a few academics, no one - at least since his death in 1825. But now that he has been accused - quite wrongly - of being responsible for Mozart's death, he's being played, recorded and talked about.
NEWS
September 24, 1991 | By Lesley Valdes, Inquirer Music Critic
You can tell in less than 10 minutes if players are comfortable making music, if they're feeling good about it and themselves. It has nothing to do with the accuracy of the performance, let alone its finesse. Attacks can be slipshod, intonation variable, but if the psychic energy released is positive, the result is, inevitably, joy. And joy is what music should be about - the joy and the exhilaration that come from reaching for things higher, better, finer than ourselves; call it aesthetic or spiritual aspiration.
NEWS
March 12, 2012 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
Now in its third season, the Black Pearl Chamber Orchestra is finding itself a niche doing typically classical things with less-than-typical participants. Oriented toward African American musicians, founder/music director Jeri Lynne Johnson is creating audiences that seem new to Haydn and Mozart - and doing so with concerts that are first-class on every level. Though some listeners Saturday at the packed Philadelphia Episcopal Cathedral could be heard quietly humming along with Mozart's beloved Sinfonia Concertante for violin, viola, and orchestra, others applauded between movements - showing not just appreciation, but that lots of listeners were new to classical concerts.
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NEWS
June 8, 2014 | BY TOM DI NARDO, For the Daily News
IN THIS CITY OF orchestras, Philadelphia Sinfonia has earned a reputation for musical excellence and for shaping young lives. Its performance tomorrow of Beethoven's mighty Ninth Symphony, with the Mendelssohn Club chorus and soloists from the Academy of Vocal Arts, marks its season finale in Kimmel Center's Verizon Hall. Founded 17 years ago, the youth orchestra has been led for 15 years by Gary White. A guest conductor of many regional orchestras and past chair of music at Germantown Friends School, White also was a working French horn player familiar with what orchestral musicians require from a conductor.
NEWS
April 10, 2012 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Culture Writer
William de Pasquale, 78, whose regal visage held a magnetic, four-decade presence at the front of the Philadelphia Orchestra's first violin section and who was a member of a remarkable family of string players, died Sunday at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital of complications relating to prostate cancer. Though Mr. de Pasquale slipped into various titles with the orchestra - associate concertmaster, acting concertmaster, second concertmaster, and co-concertmaster - the job for him always amounted to being Mr. Dependable.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 24, 2012 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
Irving Ludwig, 83, of Ardmore, longtime violinist of the Philadelphia Orchestra and music director of the Lansdowne Symphony Orchestra, died Tuesday at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania after a 19-year battle with lymphoma. "Music and family was the center of his life. They were inextricably intertwined," said his son Mark Ludwig, now a violist with the Boston Symphony Orchestra. To that end, Mark and his violinist brother Michael (now concertmaster of the Buffalo Philharmonic)
NEWS
March 12, 2012 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
Now in its third season, the Black Pearl Chamber Orchestra is finding itself a niche doing typically classical things with less-than-typical participants. Oriented toward African American musicians, founder/music director Jeri Lynne Johnson is creating audiences that seem new to Haydn and Mozart - and doing so with concerts that are first-class on every level. Though some listeners Saturday at the packed Philadelphia Episcopal Cathedral could be heard quietly humming along with Mozart's beloved Sinfonia Concertante for violin, viola, and orchestra, others applauded between movements - showing not just appreciation, but that lots of listeners were new to classical concerts.
NEWS
April 20, 2010 | By Peter Dobrin INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
At the Mann Center this summer, the Philadelphia Orchestra will host Aretha Franklin, jazz/pop trumpeter Chris Botti and pianist Andr? Watts. Regis and Joy Philbin will narrate Prokofiev's Peter and the Wolf. And Condoleezza Rice - yes, the 66th U.S. secretary of state but also a pianist of a certain level of accomplishment - joins the orchestra for the middle movement of Mozart's Piano Concerto in D minor. This season the Mann Center is taking a moment to celebrate 75. But 75 what?
ENTERTAINMENT
April 12, 2004 | By TOM DI NARDO For the Daily News
Seventeen concerts will fill the Philadelphia Orchestra's summer slate after returning from a European tour, the first led by music director Christoph Eschenbach. Before heading to the Mann Center for the Performing Arts for a more pop-oriented schedule than usual, they'll remain at the Kimmel Center for the third annual Absolutely Mozart festival. Once again conducted by Peter Oundjian, the five programs will explore the Austrian, exotic and Parisian styles of Mozart's music. Superb symphonies Nos. 29 and 36 ("Linz")
ENTERTAINMENT
June 29, 2002 | By Peter Dobrin INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Normally at this time of year, the Philadelphia Orchestra has long cleared out of Center City, having ended its regular season in early May and already spent three weeks breezing through concert halls in Buenos Aires, Tokyo or Ames. But scheduling issues, including a late opening of the Kimmel Center, kept the orchestra at home this spring, extending its downtown season well into this month. Orchestra leaders also bet that demand to hear the new concert hall would be sufficient to add a three-concert coda, which came in the form of the "Absolutely Mozart" festival that opened Thursday night.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 27, 2002 | By TOM DI NARDO For the Daily News
Remember Mozart in the Square, the late-May 1980s dessert of concerts after the season? Truth is, any time is perfect for Mozart, and the Philadelphia Orchestra has squeezed in a mini-festival of Wolfgang Amadeus between their regular and Mann seasons. Philly favorite Pamela Frank was to act as artistic director and host as well as performer, but the hand injury which put her out of commission last fall is healing much more slowly than doctors thought. The 8 p.m. Kimmel Center programs will go on as planned.
NEWS
January 14, 1992 | By Peter Dobrin, Special to The Inquirer
Antonio Salieri these days has a lot less in common with Mozart than Michael Jackson. Or Madonna. Or 2 Live Crew, for that matter. His music is little like theirs, of course, but Salieri's career is remarkably similar to those of some of today's pop stars in one important way: It has been bolstered by controversy. Who ever heard of Salieri before Amadeus? Outside of a few academics, no one - at least since his death in 1825. But now that he has been accused - quite wrongly - of being responsible for Mozart's death, he's being played, recorded and talked about.
NEWS
November 5, 1991 | By Peter Dobrin, Special to The Inquirer
Blandness characterized most of the Concerto Soloists' concert Sunday afternoon at the Church of the Holy Trinity on Rittenhouse Square. Safe works were played safely, and with one exception, the experience seemed to leave both listener and performer unburdened by the adrenalin of a good challenge. That exception came with the first performance of Concerto for Contrabassoon by Daniel Dorff, a local composer who has studied with George Rochberg, George Crumb, Karel Husa, Richard Wernick and others.
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