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NEWS
March 21, 2013
Bobbie Smith, 76, a former lead singer of the Spinners, has died in Orlando, Fla. A statement released Monday by the manager of the rhythm-and-blues group said Mr. Smith died Saturday of complications from pneumonia and influenza. The statement said he had been diagnosed with lung cancer in November. Mr. Smith was the group's original lead singer and was the voice on its first hit, "That's What Girls Are Made For. " The group earned nearly a dozen gold records and a half-dozen Grammy nominations.
NEWS
November 14, 2012 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
HERE'S HOW A FAN commented on a couple of hit songs by Major Harris: " 'Love Won't Let Me Wait' and 'I Believe in Love' were two of his biggest hits that we played so much, my parents wanted to break the records. " Such devotion was a typical reaction of R&B fans to the lead singer of Philadelphia's own Delfonics, a group graced by the Major's dulcet tones in the 1970s. He was a major player in the success of the iconic "Philadelphia Sound," as promoted by the songwriting and producing team of Kenny Gamble and Leon Huff and their Philadelphia International Records.
NEWS
November 22, 2012
Rhythm-and-blues singer Billy Scott, 70, died from pancreatic and liver cancer Saturday at his home in Charlotte, N.C. Born Peter Pendleton in Huntington, W.Va., he sang with various groups while in the Army. After he was discharged in 1964, he changed his name, and with his wife, Barbara, began recording in 1966 as the Prophets. The band's first gold record was 1968's "I Got the Fever. " Other hits included "California" and "Seaside Love" as the Georgia Prophets. The group recorded a number of hits in the 1970s in the beach-music genre, a regional variant of R&B. In 1999, Mr. Scott was inducted into the North Carolina Music Hall of Fame.
NEWS
December 29, 2012
Ray Collins, a singer whose dispute with one guitarist led him to hire another, Frank Zappa, with whom he would go on to form the avant-garde rock group the Mothers of Invention, died Monday in Pomona, Calif. The death of Mr. Collins, who was in his mid-70s, followed his admission to Pomona Valley Hospital Medical Center a week earlier for cardiac arrest, according to local news accounts. Mr. Collins entered the national spotlight with the Mothers of Invention, an outlet for Zappa's unique sense of humor and challenging, unorthodox compositions.
NEWS
August 13, 2011
Jani Lane, 47, former lead singer of the metal rock band Warrant, has died in Los Angeles. Officer Sara Faden said Mr. Lane's body was found Thursday in a Woodland Hills hotel. She had no immediate information on the cause or circumstances of his death. Assistant Chief Coroner Ed Winter said Friday that an autopsy did not reveal what killed the rocker and that the cause would be determined after results from toxicology and other tests are received. With his long blond hair and tight leather outfits, Mr. Lane, born John Kennedy Oswald in Akron, Ohio, embodied the excess of 1980s "hair metal" rock bands.
NEWS
February 6, 2013
Reg Presley, 71, lead singer of the Troggs on hit songs including the garage-rock classic "Wild Thing," died Monday at his home in Andover, England, after a yearlong bout with lung cancer. Mr. Presley and the Troggs scored their breakthrough hit in the early days of the British music invasion. The song, a cover of a version by Jordan Christopher and the Wild Ones, was later picked up not only by garage bands the world over - the lead guitar riffs were easily copied - but also by icons like Jimi Hendrix and Bruce Springsteen.
NEWS
November 20, 2012 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
CHARLOTTE, N.C. - Rhythm and blues singer Billy Scott has died in North Carolina at age 70. Scott died Saturday of pancreatic and liver cancer at his home in Charlotte, said Bill Kopald with the North Carolina Music Hall of Fame. Scott, who was born Peter Pendleton in Huntington, W. Va., sang with various groups while in the Army. After he was discharged in 1964, he changed his name, and with his wife, Barbara, in 1966 began recording as The Prophets. Their first gold record was 1968's "I Got the Fever.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 13, 2012 | By CHUCK DARROW and Daily News Staff Writer
This is getting to be routine. About four years ago, Chris Squire of the veteran progressive-rock band Yes called to explain why and how Benoit David had replaced original lead singer Jon Anderson in the then-40-year-old outfit. Recently, Squire, the group's charter bassist, was back on the blower, this time talking about David's replacement, Jon Davison, who over the next five days, will be introduced to local fans as Yes performs Friday at Tropicana Atlantic City and Wednesday at Sands Casino Resort in Bethlehem.
NEWS
September 1, 2004
A Convention Notebook item Tuesday gave an incorrect age for folk singer Pete Seeger. He is 85.
NEWS
August 22, 2012 | BY CHRIS BRENNAN, Daily News Staff Writer
CITY COMMISSION Chairwoman Stephanie Singer on Monday called on local colleges and polling firms to donate resources to identify city residents "least likely to be ready" with a state-approved identification for the Nov. 6 general election. Singer denounced a ruling last week by a state Commonwealth Court judge who refused to issue a preliminary injunction to prevent the new voter-ID requirement from being used in the upcoming election. "I need someone to step up," Singer said.
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NEWS
April 17, 2014 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
One significant voice will be absent Friday at the Los Angeles Philharmonic Orchestra's Minimalist Jukebox festival: Jeffrey Dinsmore, 42, a tenor with the Philadelphia choir the Crossing. He died Monday, April 14, of an apparent heart attack at Walt Disney Hall in Los Angeles, just before a rehearsal for the prestigious engagement he had helped arrange. "Observing Jeff's endlessly practical and pragmatic approach to life, Rebecca Siler, Jeff's partner, who is here with us, has asked us to stay with this project and sing Louis Andriessen's De Materie here on Friday," Crossing artistic director Donald Nally said Tuesday.
NEWS
April 11, 2014 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
ALBERT E. STEWART was a community organizer who helped countless poor and marginalized Philadelphians with housing and other problems, but, basically, he was a musician. "He believed in the revolutionary power of music," his family said. And he took that revolution throughout the U.S. and as far away as South Africa with a booming voice full of emotion. He traveled to the Midwest with the Philadelphia Boys Choir and sang in South Africa with a group that his family said performed for Nelson Mandela.
NEWS
April 6, 2014 | By Dr. Joseph Hassey, For The Inquirer
Bob was 70 when he developed persistent fever, night sweats, and weight loss. He had recently been admitted to a hospital for evaluation. A CT scan of the abdomen and pelvis showed an abnormality of the spleen that was concerning for a lymphoma. He then underwent surgical removal of his spleen. No malignancy was found. He continued to have fever for several more weeks and was sent to me for further evaluation. He had no significant past medical history. He was married and driving a shuttle bus for a car dealership.
NEWS
March 30, 2014 | By Toby Zinman, For The Inquirer
What a surprising show this is: first a vulgar farce, then a grim working-class drama, then a tender musical, The Rise and Fall of Little Voice at Walnut's Independence Studio on 3, turns and turns again, under the capable direction of Dan Olmstead. Written by Jim Cartwright, the British playwright best known for Road , the characters and set transfer easily to an American locale. Mari (Denise Whelan) is a loud, blowsy, over-the-hill broad, angry at the hand life has dealt her, but definitely not grieved to have lost her husband.
NEWS
March 28, 2014
HE WAS BORN a generation after its demise, but singer-pianist Mark Nadler has a deep emotional connection to the days of the Weimar Republic. That connection inspired "I'm A Stranger Here Myself," Nadler's survey of music from that era. It runs Wednesday through April 12 at the Prince Music Theatre. The Weimar (pronounced VY-mar ) Republic, roughly 1919-33 in Germany, was famously portrayed in the stage and film versions of "Cabaret. " It began in the wake of World War I and ended with the ascension of Adolph Hitler . Knowledge of it has long given Nadler a sense of pride and identification that was absent earlier in his life.
NEWS
March 21, 2014 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
PEGGY MORGAN had a big voice, easily projected over the crowds who came to see her at venues in Philadelphia and Atlantic City - appreciated by everybody. Except her nephew. Conrad Brown was a kid when his Aunt Peggy was at her prime. He called her "motormouth," explaining it was "because she was always talking and singing. " Maybe not appreciative as a child, Conrad became more fond of his aunt's talents when she would take him along to gigs. "She was like my second mother," Conrad said.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 19, 2014 | By John Timpane, Inquirer Staff Writer
Angélique Kidjo is a human explosion, in voice and in spirit. Talking to her is like surfing a creamy breaker that lifts you high and takes you far, but sets you down in a warm place. It's a Kidjo wave. On Jan. 17, Ifé , her collaboration with composer Philip Glass, debuted in Luxembourg. On Tuesday, she plays the Prince Music Theater, behind her new album Eve , which turns out to be - "But I never knew it at the time!" - a concept album "DEDICATED to the WOMEN of AFRICA/ to their RESILIENCE & their BEAUTY.
NEWS
January 16, 2014 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
MAUREEN GRAY was about 12 when she wandered into a record store at 60th and Market streets to listen to the music she had heard played on the air by such disc jockeys as Jocko Henderson and Georgie Woods. It was the famous Philadelphia Sound, launched on many a street corner in the '50s and '60s by kids harmonizing on doo-wop songs. Maureen liked to sing along with the records played in the store. But it was no ordinary store. A co-owner was John Madara, a songwriter and promoter.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 15, 2014 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
Resurrecting a possible masterpiece shouldn't come with all the difficulties of Randall Thompson's Requiem . Indeed, the tenacity required for the Philadelphia Singers to bring the piece out of obscurity through concerts and recordings tells much about why the piece needs rescuing. The hour-long, 245-page Requiem - to be performed Sunday at the Church of the Holy Trinity - seemingly arises from a parallel universe. America's best-known midcentury choral composer used many familiar elements in his 1958 Requiem . But he assembled them, creativity in full flight, with an impractical density running counter to his usual sense of populist responsibility.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 1, 2013 | By Ellen Gray
* INDEPENDENT LENS. DON'T STOP BELIEVIN': EVERYMAN'S JOURNEY. 10 tonight, WHYY12. * WE ARE MEN. 8:30 tonight, CBS3. What I know about the band Journey is pretty much limited to "Glee," the ending of "The Sopranos" and former "American Idol" judge and bass player Randy Jackson, who occasionally prefaced his assessments with the words, "When I was with Journey . . . " So maybe I'm the last person in the universe to hear about Arnel Pineda,...
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