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Single Parent

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NEWS
November 20, 1988 | By Lini S. Kadaba, Inquirer Staff Writer
Always, the simple situations get you, says Beverly Tucker. Going to a barbershop with your son. Buying him sneakers. Playing catch with him. Then come the big ones - fighting for child support, paying mounds of bills alone month after month, finding time to simply relax. They sometimes break you. Yesterday, Tucker and about 40 other black women, many raising children alone, gathered at Temple University to discuss such problems and find some solutions at a conference titled "A Call to Action: In Support of Black, Single Female Heads of Households.
NEWS
November 30, 1989 | By Jonathan Storm, Inquirer Staff Writer
NBC's new comedy, Ann Jillian, tries to be as spunky and cute as its star, but the spunk sinks and the cute curdles, and the show (8:30 tonight, Channel 3) turns out ordinary. Jillian is cute single parent Ann Malone, trying to raise cute daughter Lucy (Lisa Reiffel) in sunny California, where they've moved from tough New York. Now that her firefighter husband has been killed, she finds it hard to get credit to refinance the cute new house, so using her big-city spunk, she sets out to get a job. We've seen this stuff before.
NEWS
December 1, 1991 | By Shelly Phillips, Special to The Inquirer
My husband left when my daughter was 2. My family helps me, and there's good day care at work. Maybe I'm weird, but sometimes I feel it's easier to raise her by myself. Attitude is everything, and one-parent families needn't be all gloom and doom. Certainly it's difficult to be a single working parent, but there are heartening aspects. Since one-parent families are increasing, perhaps it's best to enjoy the sweetness in life as it is, instead of yearning for what once was. According to 1990 U.S. Census Bureau statistics, the number of two-parent families decreased by 1.2 percent in the last decade, but the number of one-parent families increased by 40.9 percent.
NEWS
August 20, 1994 | By Kelly T. Yee, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The 36 graduates sheltered the small flames of their Florence Nightingale lamps with cupped hands. Pristine in their crisp, white nursing uniforms, they prepared to receive their diplomas. To many, the Ladder of Opportunity program at the Presbyterian Medical Center of Philadelphia had been like their own protective hands. It was a haven that sheltered their aspirations for education, a different career and, for many, a renewed life. The Ladder of Opportunity program trains practical nurses and nursing assistants.
NEWS
January 31, 1991 | By Michael Vitez, Inquirer Staff Writer
Bill Lyman sorts socks. His wife slings an M-16. He helps little Billy with his spelling. She worries about Scuds. He vacuums. She sticks IVs in wounded soldiers. Bill Lyman, 61, is Mr. Mom at home in New Jersey. His wife, Lt. Rita Lyman, 39, a nurse attached to a neurosurgical unit 20 miles from the Kuwaiti border, is a soldier. She may be at war, but so far he's the one with all the battles. Like Monday night. "This is it," he explained, wiping up the ground beef 8-year-old Billy had spilled on the kitchen floor.
NEWS
June 9, 1992 | By R.A. Zaldivar, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Move over, Murphy Brown. At a time when Americans are redefining the family, single-father families are growing at a faster rate than any other family type - including those headed by single mothers. A study for the federal government by economists Daniel Meyer and Steven Garasky has found that the number of single-father families has increased sharply since 1973. Between 1973 and 1989 the number of father-only families increased by 242 percent. In the same period, families headed by mothers increased by 62 percent, while married couples with children declined by 2 percent.
SPORTS
September 4, 2014 | By Sam Donnellon, Daily News Staff Writer
ONE YEAR into the Chip Kelly era, there is a recurring theme among the Eagles players who work the fringes of the team. The role guys, the special-teams players, the likely to be inactives. They've got their, um, stuff together. At least more together than many of their peers. They take little for granted. They appreciate their station on this roster, rather than feel slighted by it. They speak repeatedly about their self-belief, and about the background names that anchor and lift them.
NEWS
January 20, 2005
I, LIKE MANY Pennsylvanians, just received $52 less in my paycheck. This is five times last year's $10 town occupancy tax. I want to know what Gov. Rendell and every legislator who voted for this 420 percent hike would say to a single parent working full time at minimum wage who makes about $185 a week, but who now must try to feed, clothe and shelter their child for $132 this week. Mike Slye Media
NEWS
May 18, 2001
Ozzie and Harriet don't live here anymore. Not in Philadelphia, anyhow. Latest Census data indicate that most suburban families (81 percent) still have a mom and dad - but within the city, for the first time, single-parent households are the majority (51 percent). We'll leave the reasons to the sociologists. What should concern us more than the whys and wherefores is what this means to the children - and to the community at large. For one thing, single-parent families are more likely to be poor than traditional households.
NEWS
September 25, 1988 | By Rich Henson, Inquirer Staff Writer
Chester County Human Services officials are laying the groundwork for a unique housing program designed to help single-parent families get off public welfare and gain economic independence. The key to the program, called Project Self Sufficiency, is that a wide range of social services will be coordinated and made available to clients. The incentive, according to program director Barbara Wilson, is that subsidized rent vouchers will be given to clients who obtain job training and actively pursue other support services they need to become independent of the welfare system.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 1, 2016
DEAR ABBY: I'm concerned about a photo my uncle posted to Facebook. It features my two female cousins, ages 6 and 2, shirtless. I know no harm was intended in posting the photo, as they are both adorable girls. However, I find it inappropriate that the 6-year-old - who is going into first grade - was shirtless in the photo. Now that it is on the internet, it could be easily seen by a pedophile. How do I express my concern to my uncle about this without coming off as if I were trying to parent for him?
NEWS
May 16, 2016
DEAR ABBY: There is a guy that I kind of like at school, but he's really shy and doesn't really talk to anybody. I have talked to him a couple times, and he's really nice and has good manners. He sits with me and my group every day at lunch, and I see him around school. I say hi to him every time, but I'm not really getting any results. I would really love some guidance. - Shy Teen in California DEAR SHY TEEN: I think you are doing everything you can right now without scaring him off. On the plus side, this boy is comfortable with your group, or he wouldn't be having lunch with you. If you all socialize beyond eating together (such as going to school dances or sporting events)
BUSINESS
March 7, 2016
Well, Super Tuesday has come and gone, and the likely presidential candidates for each party look even more likely. No matter who wins the nominations, we need to start thinking about how to evaluate the candidates' economic strategies. Right now, those policies consist of not being a lightweight and not being a socialist. But eventually, policy will be discussed, and judging the validity of the ideas is not as easy as our political "leaders" imply. What seems logical may be nothing more than faulty thinking.
NEWS
December 27, 2015 | $util.encode.html($!item.byline), $util.encode.html($!item.bycredit)
DEAR ABBY: My daughter, a single parent, has a 27-year-old son who has assaulted her several times. He has never worked and has been in trouble with the law because of drugs. Recently, she called me to ask if she and her son could spend the night with me. (They live 160 miles away.) I told her that because of his past behavior it wasn't a good idea. She was very offended and said I would "never see her son again. " After sending me several hurtful emails, she's no longer speaking to me, despite the fact that I have always taken care of her and listened to her problems about her son. I deserve an apology - which I won't receive.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 15, 2015 | By Patricia Mans, For The Inquirer
At 17, Ecila has a clear vision of her professional future. "I want to help children like me who are in foster care," she says. "I want to be a social worker because I feel like I understand the system more than many social workers. I've been through it. " Recently, Ecila has developed an interest in photography and enjoys visiting museums, but her favorite way of expressing herself is writing poetry. "I write about my experiences in foster care," she says, "the happy times and the difficult times.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 13, 2015 | By Patricia Mans, For The Inquirer
Joshua delights in solving computer problems, and he excels at it. Those who know the 11-year-old say he is an IT expert. When not on the computer, Joshua can frequently be found surfing the Web on his iPad. He also enjoys swimming and taking drum lessons. Joshua does well in school, where he benefits from a small class size and individual attention. He is passionate about anything relating to science. He especially loves learning about dinosaurs and sea creatures. Last semester, he earned three school achievement awards, which mean a lot to him. He plans to work hard to receive more awards.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 8, 2015 | By Patricia Mans, For The Inquirer
Despite his many physical challenges, Darnell is a happy 13-year-old. He enjoys being surrounded by people, and when someone says his name, he responds with a smile. Although he is unable to see the television screen, he likes listening to cartoons, and delights in singing and being sung to. When in his recreational swing, he smiles often and makes cooing sounds. Darnell receives physical, occupational, and speech therapy in his specialized school setting. He has a feeding tube and a tracheotomy tube, and will need lifelong care.
NEWS
April 10, 2015 | By Howard Gensler
E DDIE MURPHY will be awarded the nation's top prize for humor this year by the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts. Why? He's Gumby, dammit! The center announced yesterday that Murphy, 54, will receive the Mark Twain Prize for American Humor on Oct. 18, so he has six months to come up with something to say (unlike his "SNL 40" appearance). The humor prize honors those who influence society through their social commentary and satire in the tradition of Mark Twain . Like "Mr. Robinson's Neighborhood"?
SPORTS
September 4, 2014 | By Sam Donnellon, Daily News Staff Writer
ONE YEAR into the Chip Kelly era, there is a recurring theme among the Eagles players who work the fringes of the team. The role guys, the special-teams players, the likely to be inactives. They've got their, um, stuff together. At least more together than many of their peers. They take little for granted. They appreciate their station on this roster, rather than feel slighted by it. They speak repeatedly about their self-belief, and about the background names that anchor and lift them.
SPORTS
May 13, 2014 | BY MIKE KERN, Daily News Staff Writer kernm@phillynews.com
KHALIF HERBIN'S story is remarkable. In large part because it almost never became a story at all. You only have to be around him for a few minutes to know that Temple's slightly built wide receiver/kick returner with the engaging smile was obviously raised the right way. By, as it turns out, someone who didn't have to take on such a responsibility. "I just did the best I could," said his mother, Lynda Jones. Even if she wasn't the woman who brought him into the world.
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