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Sirens

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NEWS
June 18, 1996 | by Dave Racher, Daily News Staff Writer
The shrill sound of a passing fire engine's siren can be deafening to motorists, bystanders and homeowners. But how do the responding firefighters stand up to the noise? Some don't. They go deaf, or suffer partial hearing loss, especially when they are subjected to defective sirens. At least that's what eight Philadelphia firefighters claim in a suit against manufacturers or distributors of sirens that allegedly malfuctioned. The companies protested when the firefighters tried to turn their suit into a class-action.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 6, 2014 | By Ellen Gray
* SIRENS. 10 p.m. tomorrow, USA. * CHICAGOLAND. 10 p.m. tomorrow, CNN. * SAINT GEORGE. 9 p.m. tomorrow, FX.   CHICAGO, increasingly television's kind of town, adds another series to its roster of locally filmed shows tomorrow with the premiere of USA's "Sirens," a wacky Denis Leary-produced comedy about EMTs. But the Windy City's true close-up will occur on CNN, with the launch of "Chicagoland," a documentary series from the Peabody Award-winning team behind Sundance TV's Newark, N.J.-focused "Brick City.
NEWS
October 14, 1996 | by Ron Avery, Daily News Staff Writer
Being a firefighter means breathing smoke, eating soot, pulling muscles, and risking life and limb. Now, some fireighters say they are going deaf from all the noise and wailing sirens. A dozen Philadelphia firefighters, most of them retired, have filed suit in Common Pleas Court against siren and horn manufacturers alleging acute hearing loss. The number of plaintiffs could hit 50, according to attorneys Michael Hepps and Kenneth Mirsky, who declined to discuss the litigation. The suits charge that the manufacturers should be forced to pay damages under product-liability claims because they did not warn firefighters about the dangers of hearing loss from their devices.
NEWS
April 17, 1997 | By Karl Stark, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
For 17 years, it didn't matter if the call came before dinner or before dawn. John A. Weer would drop anything he was doing and rush to extinguish smoke-belching car fires, burning mattresses, and blazing barns for the Unionville Fire Company in Chester County. Firefighting was virtually a family obligation. Weer was a third-generation volunteer whose grandfather donated the land for the Unionville firehouse; his grandmother took the fire calls in their home and flicked the switch that sounded the siren.
NEWS
December 20, 1990 | By Robert F. O'Neill, Special to The Inquirer
Lansdowne offers many of the typical sights of the old boroughs that dot the Philadelphia suburbs: three-story stone houses on huge lots and a tidy business district. But it offers one distinctive sound: the bone-rattling blare of perhaps the loudest fire siren this side of the Queen Mary. The 12-horn signal atop the two-story Borough Hall had been out of service for two years during the building's renovation. But now it is back in full voice, to the dismay of some residents and businesses in the eastern Delaware County borough.
NEWS
July 29, 1987 | By Joseph Cardamone, Special to The Inquirer
The continuing controversy between the Eastampton Township Council and the 35-member volunteer fire company heated up again last night as the council voted to place restrictions on sounding the township's three fire sirens between 11 p.m. and 6 a.m. By a 2-1 ratio, the council voted to amend the ordinance, which, when originally introduced, prohibited the sirens from sounding from 10 p.m. to 7 a.m. for any fire. The new ordinance permits the use of sirens at any hour if the fire is reported at a residential structure.
NEWS
August 15, 1991 | By Dominic Sama, Inquirer Staff Writer
Responding to complaints from residents, the Radnor Fire Company announced Monday that it was cutting back on the use of its fire and ambulance sirens. The fire company also announced a $2 million campaign for a new and larger firehouse to be built on the current site on South Wayne Avenue. Ken Whitehead, president of the fire company, said that some reduction in siren use had already begun and that the full-scale change would be in effect by Sept. 1. "We have had numerous complaints over the past three and four years from citizens about the use of the sirens, particularly in the early-morning hours and at nighttime when children would be awakened," Whitehead said.
NEWS
December 3, 1989
It should not require a deadly police chase and a lawsuit for the city to ensure that police officers are equipped with modern, working tools of the trade. Like sirens. The city is now defending itself against charges that it was partly to blame for a fatal accident resulting from a high-speed police chase on Nov. 12. The long chase ended when one of the three cars being pursued crashed into another car occupied by a young mother, who was killed. The pursuing police car didn't have a siren.
NEWS
January 19, 1991 | By Vernon Loeb, Inquirer Staff Writer
This city was awakened at 7:20 this morning by the wail of sirens. Three minutes later at least three blasts could be heard and the concussion from the blasts at the Hilton Hotel felt like a high sudden wind hitting the building. About a mile or two to the west, almost simultaneously, a large plume of smoke rose. Tel Aviv had been struck by missiles again. The smoke looked much like that from the missile attacks 30 hours earlier around Tel Aviv. As soon as the sirens sounded, Israeli radio ordered citizens to don gas masks and enter sealed rooms.
NEWS
March 11, 1994 | by Gary Thompson, Daily News Movie Critic
Despite its 1930s setting and its remote Australian locale, the issues raised in "Sirens" are squarely in the here and now. "Sirens" plunges into the debate about sexual politics and the power of sexual images with playful energy and a winning sense of humor. On the other hand, the movie is a bit more pretentious and a bit less funny than the previous work of director John Duigan ("Flirting"). "Sirens" is the story of a Protestant minister (Hugh Grant) dispatched to the rural home of a bohemian painter (Sam Neill)
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NEWS
July 4, 2016 | By Julie Shaw, STAFF WRITER
A regular monthly siren test of the Philadelphia Energy Solutions Refining Complex at 28th Street and Passyunk Avenue in South Philadelphia will occur at noon Saturday. Sirens are tested on the first Saturday of each month at noon for 30 seconds, the city said. In the event of a real emergency, the siren sounds continuously for three minutes. Residents are advised to follow shelter-in-place advisories whenever the sirens sound, the city advises. That means, residents should not panic, but should go inside, close all doors and windows and turn off ventilation systems.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 6, 2014 | By Ellen Gray
* SIRENS. 10 p.m. tomorrow, USA. * CHICAGOLAND. 10 p.m. tomorrow, CNN. * SAINT GEORGE. 9 p.m. tomorrow, FX.   CHICAGO, increasingly television's kind of town, adds another series to its roster of locally filmed shows tomorrow with the premiere of USA's "Sirens," a wacky Denis Leary-produced comedy about EMTs. But the Windy City's true close-up will occur on CNN, with the launch of "Chicagoland," a documentary series from the Peabody Award-winning team behind Sundance TV's Newark, N.J.-focused "Brick City.
SPORTS
April 27, 2013 | By Phil Anastasia, Inquirer Columnist
In any other year, their red uniforms would have blurred into the kaleidescope of color at the world's oldest and largest track and field carnival. This year was different for the women who wore those bright tops emblazoned with six large letters: "B-O-S-T-O-N. " "Everybody was saying something to us," said Boston University's Nikko Brady, a senior from New Castle, Del., who ran the opening leg on the Terriers' 4x100 relay team at the Penn Relays on Thursday. "Everybody was like, 'We got you, Boston.
SPORTS
December 3, 2012 | By Mike Jensen, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A year ago, Zack Rosen and Ramone Moore were Big Five rivals. Penn's Rosen was Big Five player of the year, Temple's Moore the runner-up. In the summertime, they often worked out together. This season, they both landed jobs a five-minute drive apart, for different teams in the top professional league in Israel. Moore in the outskirts of Tel Aviv, Rosen in Holon, just south. "If Tel Aviv is Manhattan, Holon is Queens," Rosen explained by e-mail. "It's a city with a lot of spirit.
NEWS
March 20, 2012 | Staff Report
Two police officers were hurt today when their police van was rammed by a car at an intersection in Northeast Philadelphia and flipped over. The officers were taken to Aria Health's Torresdale hospital complaining of neck and back pain, police said. Their injuries are not considered life threatening. The female driver of the Toyota that rammed the van was taken to Albert Einstein Medical Center for observation. Police said the van was northbound on Harbison Avenue with its sirens on and lights flashing about 8:45 a.m. when Toyota, which was eastbound on East Cheltenham Avenue., slammed into the driver's side of the van. The van flipped and landed on the hood of the Toyota.
NEWS
September 26, 2011 | By Joe Mandak, ASSOCIATED PRESS
PITTSBURGH - A company that makes the Long Range Acoustic Device that Pittsburgh police used to control protesters during the Group of 20 economic summit two years ago disputes the scientific claims contained in an American Civil Liberties Union lawsuit filed last week. San Diego, Calif.-based LRAD Corp. wasn't named in the suit which claims a visiting college professor suffered hearing loss when the loud device was used to issue police commands and to amplify loud sounds meant to disperse protesters.
NEWS
July 15, 2011
HUMMELSTOWN, Pa. - People in this Central Pennsylvania borough got a scare when a Three Mile Island warning siren briefly sounded Thursday, but officials said it was a false alarm. The siren is one of 96 in a 10-mile radius of the nuclear power plant. It sounded for about 30 seconds shortly after 1 p.m. Dauphin County Emergency Management Agency officials were notified through an automated monitoring network that the alarm went off. They were working with Exelon, the operator of Three Mile Island, to determine the cause of the false alarm.
NEWS
June 23, 2011 | By Dave Kolpack, Associated Press
MINOT, N.D. - Plastic sheeting hung over the apartment building like a shroud, stretching from the eaves to the ground. Across it, someone had spray-painted "pray" and drawn a line labeled "1969" - the level where floodwaters had risen the last time the Souris River climbed out of its banks in Minot. That line stood just two feet above the ground. But the water is expected to climb far higher in parts of this Air Force town over the coming days as the waterway swells from rain and snowmelt.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 20, 2009 | By Steven Rea INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Pen?lope Cruz will tell you she is not from another world. Don't believe her. Winner of an Oscar in the spring for her ball-of-fire performance as a bisexual, bipolar artist in Woody Allen's Vicky Cristina Barcelona, Cruz says that Audrey Hepburn and Marilyn Monroe - they were the creatures from beyond Earth's sphere. "They had the talent and the magic and that beauty," says Cruz, who has a double feature - Pedro Almod?var's Broken Embraces and the glitzy musical Nine - opening on Christmas Day. "They were like Martians, the two of them, they were like from another world.
NEWS
November 19, 2009 | By Patrick Kerkstra and Maya Rao INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
It was an offer the Dad Vail Regatta could not refuse, and one that the cash-strapped City of Philadelphia could not hope to match: $250,000 in guaranteed donations, and sharply lowered operating costs to boot. In exchange, the 2010 regatta - the largest collegiate rowing event in the nation - will not take place on the Schuylkill, as it has for the last 55 years, but in the exclusive New Jersey suburb of Rumson, home to Wall Street titans and to stars like Bruce Springsteen and Queen Latifah.
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