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NEWS
April 8, 2007 | By Craig LaBan, Inquirer Restaurant Critic
'Aaah, yes," the waitress said reassuringly as men with long blades and skewered meats scurried back and forth beside our table. "Our gauchos are highly trained in Brazil for several years. " I was a tad confused at first when our waitress told us this at Fogo de Chão, the elegant new churrascaria near City Hall. Granted, it must require a certain amount of practiced delicacy to navigate a bustling steakhouse with sword-length knives and heavy skewers laden with roasted, drippy meats.
FOOD
November 5, 1986 | By MERLE ELLIS, Special to the Daily News
Beef used to come to market in carcass form, with the bones still in. Yeah, it did. I know it's hard to believe. You seldom see a bone these days but that's the way beef used to come. All of the cutting was done on the premises by the butcher or butchers on duty and the cuts of beef were pretty basic, most often identified by the shape of the bone that was in them. You had, for example, your basic T-bone steak, then there was the sirloin steak which was either "round bone sirloin," or "flat bone sirloin" or "wedge bone sirloin," depending on the shape of the bone.
FOOD
December 18, 2008 | By Elisa Ludwig FOR THE INQUIRER
In some homes, a pricey beef roast is the yuletide equivalent of Thanksgiving's sweet potato and marshmallow casserole: essential. Yet in tougher times such as these, a $100 rack of prime rib is out of the question for many hosts, a $150 cut of filet mignon unthinkable. Even for those who can afford it, luxury meat can seem distasteful, an edible symbol of the excesses that have contributed to our financial woes. "I've served prime rib for the past five years . . . but this year we'll be doing a turkey," says Lois West, a school administrator and Center City resident.
FOOD
March 12, 2009
Happy St. Patty's Day Simple is better. Ask chef Ben McNamara what goes into his luxuriously rich shepherd's pie at St. Stephen's Green, the Fairmount pub, and he's a bit incredulous at the suggestion that it's more than it is. How fancy can it get? He starts with mirepoix (carrot, celery, onion), adds 90-percent-lean ground sirloin, roux, tomato paste, beef stock and peas. Then he pipes fresh potatoes whipped with heavy cream and butter on top. - Michael Klein Shepherd's pie ($12)
ENTERTAINMENT
August 30, 2012 | byline w, o email
State Store Pick of the Week Château Ste. Michelle Cabernet Sauvignon Columbia Valley, Wash. $16.99 PLCB Item No. 8408 The huge Columbia Valley occupies south-central Washington, fitting snugly in the rain shadow of the Cascade Mountains. Sun-drenched and sheltered, the region is ideal for wine-growing. The conditions work well for many grapes, but Cabernet Sauvignon benefits more than most. High elevation means cool nights and a long growing season. This gives thick-skinned Cabernet grapes a chance to ripen fully and evenly, yielding a soft mouthfeel and juicy blackberry flavors.
FOOD
March 19, 1986 | By MERLE ELLIS, Special to the Daily News
Today we dip into the mailbag and try to answer some of your meaty questions. One reader writes, "I would like to know the names of the primal cuts of beef and the various cuts that are derived from the primal cuts. I have been trying to make some sense out of meat names, and I am totally bewildered. I find it very difficult to comparison shop meat just because I can't make much sense out of the labeling. " Learning the primal cuts is easy, there are only nine: Chuck: The shoulder of the beef animal with the neck, brisket and foreshank removed.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 15, 1987 | By Gerald Etter, Inquirer Food Writer
The word on the street seems to be that beef - along with other foods high in fats, sugar and sodium - is out. A look at the statistics, however, shows that the nation's love affair with steaks is far from over. It is true there is a general trend toward eating less red meat, and there has been a decline in red-meat sales. But among meat-eaters, beef remains the red meat of choice. In a study of inflation and buying habits, the Labor Department found that even among people who have decided to eat less red meat, when they do order meat, the choice generally will be steak rather than other cuts.
FOOD
May 16, 2013 | By Elizabeth Karmel, Associated Press
When the weather turns warm, I find myself craving the smell and taste of a great homemade burger off the grill. So what makes a great burger? There are a few simple rules. But if you remember just one of them, it should be that less really is more. Which is to say, the less you add to your ground beef, the less you handle the meat when mixing it, and the less you flip it while grilling, the better burger you get in the end. The foundation of my backyard burger is a 50-50 combination of sirloin and chuck.
FOOD
October 29, 1986 | By MERLE ELLIS, Special to the Daily News
Steers used to be pretty simple critters, back in Grandma's day. They had a couple of front legs with shoulders attached, most of which were called "chucks," named after a famous butcher from Cincinnati, it's said. Eh, yup! Ol' Charlie Farquart war his name. Then they had a couple of "rounds. " Those were the hind legs. Never could quite figure why they called 'em rounds and chucks, ever' other critter has legs and shoulders but beef have "rounds" and "chucks. " Anyway, in between, there were a few T-bones and Porterhouse steaks, a rib roast or two and that was about it. Nothing fancy, a lot of good meat, but nothing too complicated in terms of terms.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
FOOD
May 16, 2013 | By Elizabeth Karmel, Associated Press
When the weather turns warm, I find myself craving the smell and taste of a great homemade burger off the grill. So what makes a great burger? There are a few simple rules. But if you remember just one of them, it should be that less really is more. Which is to say, the less you add to your ground beef, the less you handle the meat when mixing it, and the less you flip it while grilling, the better burger you get in the end. The foundation of my backyard burger is a 50-50 combination of sirloin and chuck.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 30, 2012 | byline w, o email
State Store Pick of the Week Château Ste. Michelle Cabernet Sauvignon Columbia Valley, Wash. $16.99 PLCB Item No. 8408 The huge Columbia Valley occupies south-central Washington, fitting snugly in the rain shadow of the Cascade Mountains. Sun-drenched and sheltered, the region is ideal for wine-growing. The conditions work well for many grapes, but Cabernet Sauvignon benefits more than most. High elevation means cool nights and a long growing season. This gives thick-skinned Cabernet grapes a chance to ripen fully and evenly, yielding a soft mouthfeel and juicy blackberry flavors.
NEWS
July 3, 2011 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
The recipe for Jim's Jarhead Jerky is hush-hush, but the patriotism packed into every pound of this distinctive dried beef snack is no secret. Jim Ewen and his wife, Joette, started making and shipping beef jerky to frontline American troops in 2009 after their son-in-law, Tim Missel, shared his care package with fellow Marines in Iraq. "Everybody wanted more . . . even guys who didn't like beef jerky," recalls Tim, now 24 and home safe in Medford. "Sometimes it served as two or three meals in a row for me . . . rather than the MREs," or meals ready to eat. "I like to cook as a hobby, but I had never done jerky, so I started trial and error," explains Jim, a 57-year-old transportation company executive and a Marine Corps veteran.
FOOD
September 23, 2010
Nestled beside the Wissahickon along the pedestrian paradise of Forbidden Drive, historic Valley Green Inn has long conjured an image of a fusty park amenity for the wedding crowd and the ladies-luncheon crab cake set. But there's been a surprising push to update the menu over the last couple years that paid tasty dividends at a recent lunch, with deft nods to lighter dishes that focus on good seasonal ingredients. Alongside well-wrought classics (such as rich French onion soup and a tender sirloin sandwich)
FOOD
December 18, 2008 | By Elisa Ludwig FOR THE INQUIRER
In some homes, a pricey beef roast is the yuletide equivalent of Thanksgiving's sweet potato and marshmallow casserole: essential. Yet in tougher times such as these, a $100 rack of prime rib is out of the question for many hosts, a $150 cut of filet mignon unthinkable. Even for those who can afford it, luxury meat can seem distasteful, an edible symbol of the excesses that have contributed to our financial woes. "I've served prime rib for the past five years . . . but this year we'll be doing a turkey," says Lois West, a school administrator and Center City resident.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 31, 2008 | By Craig LaBan, Inquirer Restaurant Critic
Dressing down can be a tricky affair, especially for famous French chefs and fancy hotels. When it doesn't go smoothly, it can be as awkward as watching a rich uncle step out in tube socks and loafers. So I was intrigued to visit 10 Arts and discover what brand of casual chic would emerge from the collaboration between Philadelphia's Ritz-Carlton, the marble-columned temple of classic stuffy, and the modern French perfection of super chef Eric Ripert from New York's Le Bernardin. The Ritz, reliably upscale but lacking culinary personality, could use some star-power pizzazz.
SPORTS
August 30, 2008 | By Bob Brookover INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Andy Burgers are always on the menu Saturday night. Asked to recall a memorable speech by his head coach during his six seasons with the Eagles, cornerback Lito Sheppard could come up with only one thing. "I'll treat you to some cheeseburgers," he said, laughing about Andy Reid's signature Saturday night ritual. "He says that every week. It's the snack after the meeting. There are other things you can eat, but the cheeseburgers are always on the menu. " Reid's cheeseburger promise has been consistent since he became the head coach in 1999, with one exception.
FOOD
May 24, 2007
Here are Craig LaBan's favorite burgers in the Philadelphia region, in no particular order: The burger that inspired the song "Cheeseburger, I Hold," Good Dog's signature sandwich triumphs where so many before have tried and failed - stuffing a burger with blue cheese. The meat itself is deliciously seasoned, perfectly cooked, and wisely topped only with a mop of sauteed onions. But bite into the heart, and behold. A river of molten bleu. A powerhouse of tangy savor. Too rich to be an everyday burger.
NEWS
April 8, 2007 | By Craig LaBan, Inquirer Restaurant Critic
'Aaah, yes," the waitress said reassuringly as men with long blades and skewered meats scurried back and forth beside our table. "Our gauchos are highly trained in Brazil for several years. " I was a tad confused at first when our waitress told us this at Fogo de Chão, the elegant new churrascaria near City Hall. Granted, it must require a certain amount of practiced delicacy to navigate a bustling steakhouse with sword-length knives and heavy skewers laden with roasted, drippy meats.
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