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Sister Mary Scullion

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NEWS
April 10, 2005 | By Gloria A. Hoffner INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Working one or even two jobs at 40 hours plus a week for the minimum wage of $5.15 an hour no longer guarantees the laborer an affordable place to sleep at day's end, says Sister Mary Scullion. This is what drives Sister Mary, a member of the Religious Sisters of Mercy and a nationally known advocate for the homeless, mentally ill and poor. Recently honored with the National Alliance to End Homelessness Award, Sister Mary will speak on the economic, social and political causes of homelessness at 1:30 p.m. Thursday at Neumann College's Cultural Arts Forum.
NEWS
May 1, 2009 | By Jennifer Lin INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It's not often that Sister Mary Scullion is mentioned in the same breath as economist Paul Krugman, actress Kate Winslet, and Ponzi schemer Bernie Madoff. But the release yesterday of the "Time 100" list of the most influential people in the world has put the 55-year-old Philadelphia nun and homeless advocate in unusual company. Scullion, who started Project HOME, a nonprofit provider of housing and homeless services, finds herself in the magazine's sixth annual list, in the portion for "Heroes & Icons.
NEWS
February 21, 1999 | By Walter F. Naedele, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In the winter of 1988-89, a Vietnam vet named Joe Payne was living on a steam vent near the venerable Union League in Center City. "He had been there for a long time," Sister Mary Scullion said, "but he was willing to come in, that winter, for the first time. " Out of the cold. Into an overnight shelter that Sister Scullion had set up in the swimming-pool locker room of a city recreation center. During the day, the usual swimmers. At night, the homeless. That was the beginning.
NEWS
June 7, 2011
A version of this was originally published on Christine Flowers' blog, the Flowers Show ( www.philly.com/ philly/blogs/flowersshow ).   I KNOW I'M going to get into trouble for this with the Big Guy. There's bound to be some karmic backlash when you criticize Sister Mary Scullion, our local Mother Teresa. She's lionized as a tireless advocate for the disenfranchised (and she is). She's been in music videos as a hero. (She's that, too.) Been tagged as one of the most influential people in the world.
NEWS
May 17, 1997 | The Philadelphia Inquirer / RON TARVER
Sister Mary Scullion, director of Project HOME, receives an honorary doctorate of humane letters from Linda Kraemer, dean of the College of Health Professionals at Thomas Jefferson University. Project HOME finds housing for low-income and homeless people.
NEWS
November 29, 2012
Last year, it was Sister Mary Scullion, Philadelphia's tireless advocate for the homeless. Who should be The Inquirer's 2012 Citizen of the Year? Nominate someone who helped the city, state, or nation in an effective, creative way. E-mail a brief description of his or her achievements to kboyer@phillynews.com , with "Citizen" in the subject line. Or mail it to Citizen of the Year, The Inquirer, 801 Market St., Suite 300, Philadelphia 19107. The deadline is Dec. 7.
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NEWS
January 30, 2016 | By Alfred Lubrano, Staff Writer
In the pre-midnight cold, more than 300 people fanned out on Philadelphia streets to count the homeless. Around 3 a.m. Thursday, the job was over, the census of a complex, enigmatic population recorded for another year. The so-called January Point-In-Time Count is carried out annually in cities on the same night throughout America, a requirement of the federal government. By Thursday afternoon, the official results were not in, said Sister Mary Scullion, who runs Project HOME, which takes a lead role in the count.
NEWS
February 2, 2015 | Inquirer Editorial Board
Now that 2014 is history, it's time for Inquirer readers to look back and tell us who should receive the Editorial Board's 11th annual Citizen of the Year award. The award honors people who have helped their neighborhood, city, region, or nation in effective, creative ways while demonstrating integrity and perseverance. Last year's winner was Dorothy Johnson-Speight, who was cited for her dedication to reducing the number of murders in Philadelphia as executive director of Mothers in Charge.
NEWS
December 6, 2012
Last year, it was Sister Mary Scullion, Philadelphia's tireless advocate for the homeless. Who should be The Inquirer's 2012 Citizen of the Year? Nominate someone who helped the city, state, or nation in an effective, creative way. E-mail a brief description of his or her achievements to kboyer@phillynews.com , with "Citizen" in the subject line. Or mail it to Citizen of the Year, The Inquirer, 801 Market St., Suite 300, Philadelphia 19107. The deadline is Dec. 7.
NEWS
November 23, 2012 | BY JAN RANSOM, Daily News Staff Writer ransomj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5218
IT'S BEEN ROUGH going for Hubert Washington. He served two tours in Iraq, has struggled with post-traumatic stress disorder and drug addiction, and last year celebrated Thanksgiving in jail for possession of a firearm. But Thursday morning, Washington, 29, stood at a lectern before a crowd that gathered for Project HOME's 21st annual Thanksgiving Day service at its headquarters, on Fairmount Avenue near 15th Street, and shared reasons why he's thankful. "I'm thankful to be alive, for having a roof over my head, for people that care about me," Washington said.
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