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Sister Ship

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NEWS
February 28, 2012 | By Jason Straziuso and Frances D'Emilio, Associated Press
NAIROBI, Kenya - An Italian cruise liner carrying more than 1,000 people was adrift without power in the pirate-infested Indian Ocean on Monday after a fire erupted in its generator room. The blaze, which was extinguished, caused no injuries, officials said. Two tug boats from the island nation of Seychelles were steaming toward the drifting Costa Allegra, which had 636 passengers and 413 crew members on board, but they were not expected to arrive until Tuesday afternoon at the earliest.
NEWS
July 17, 1988 | The Philadelphia Inquirer / MICHAEL MALLY
ABOARD THE AEGIS CRUISER Yorktown, visitors look at a Standard missile launcher. The same type of missiles from a sister ship, the Vincennes, downed an Iranian airliner with 290 people aboard over the Persian Gulf. More than 700 people visited the ship yesterday at Penn's Landing in Philadelphia. The last tours are from 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. today.
NEWS
September 29, 1999 | By Jack Brown, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
For more than 30 years, Jerry Shaw has been painstakingly reproducing the USS Forrestal. He laid the 12-foot keel of his model in 1965, with carefully warped strips of basswood, overlaid it with a coating of fiberglass, and began to build the superstructure with strips of aluminum and brass. Every deck drain, every landing light, every strip of railing had to be modeled with exacting drill and file and paint work, every airplane and catwalk built from bits of plastic and rubber and brass.
NEWS
March 30, 2003 | By Nancy Petersen INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
At 11:20 yesterday morning, the first vessel to be built at the former Philadelphia Naval Shipyard in more than three decades floated. Welder Kim Gibbons cried, then raced to call her mother, who was standing on the New Jersey side of the river ready to film the historic event. "Pull that big boy out of here," yelled health and safety officer Jim Lewis. Then he said in a near whisper: "I never thought I'd see it happen. " To cheers from a proud and somewhat awestruck corps of workers at what is now the Kvaerner Philadelphia Shipyard, the container ship Manukai, aided by a fleet of five tugboats, floated out of a flooded dry dock into the Delaware River, and then was maneuvered into another nearby dock for its final construction phase.
NEWS
May 6, 1989 | By Susan Levine, Inquirer Staff Writer
Glasnost hit the Freedom Trail yesterday. It was not your usual shuttle diplomacy. The Soviet visitors were not high- ranking ambassadors but men and women from a Soviet factory ship that for nearly four months has been stationed 2 miles off the Massachusetts coast processing herring. They rode not in police-escorted limousines but in brown-and-yellow Yankee Coach buses that vied with all the other buses and weekday traffic on city streets. And they visited the birthplace of America - from the Old North Church to the USS Constitution to the gold-domed Statehouse on Beacon Hill - without the usual rich stories about Paul Revere, "One if by land, two if by sea" and the like.
NEWS
June 26, 2015 | By Erin Edinger-Turoff, Inquirer Staff Writer
For Ignacio Garcia Du Quesne and Philippe H. Despointes, this year's Tall Ships Festival isn't just a celebration of maritime splendors - it's a chance for them to reconnect with their Revolutionary War roots. Both men trace their family lines back to crew of the French warship Hermione, which in 1780 carried the Marquis de Lafayette and his forces to join the Americans in their nascent revolution. A replica of the historical warship - built using its sister ship's original plans, and tools, techniques, and materials of the era - will be at Penn's Landing for the Tall Ships Festival, which starts Thursday and ends Sunday.
TRAVEL
March 11, 2012 | By James Lileks, MINNEAPOLIS STAR TRIBUNE
We took a cruise with 912 children, 911 of whom were not ours. For people who don't like other people's kids in such quantities, or who believe that cruise ships are floating tubs of gluttony and indolence, this must all sound like a nightmare. There was a moment when the poolside noise level was enough to make Davy Jones himself swim up to the surface and tell us to hold it down, but Davy Jones was actually at the party. At least everyone went quiet when the ship launched the fireworks.
NEWS
December 2, 1990 | By Donald D. Groff, Special to The Inquirer
With the reunification of Germany, I've heard there are plans for an Elbe River cruise. Where can I get a schedule? R.B., Newtown After 45 years of separating Eastern and Western Europe, the Elbe River will have a unifying role of sorts as river-tour traffic emerges. EuropAmerica Cruises has announced plans to launch a ship, the Prussian Princess, for Elbe cruises beginning in March. The Elbe flows 725 miles from Czechoslovakia to northern Germany, and EuropAmerica says the Prussian Princess will be the first overnight cruise ship on the river.
NEWS
May 23, 2010 | By David G. Molyneaux FOR THE INQUIRER
More than 10 years have passed since Walt Disney Co. made a major splash in the cruise world with its first two ships, Disney Magic and Disney Wonder. Come January, the company known best for its theme parks will roll out a third ship, the Disney Dream. It will feature animated bells and whistles that parents and children will find nowhere else at sea. Imagine enchanted pictures on the walls - some will interact with passengers - and interior cabins with an active porthole view of the ocean and an occasional visit by a starfish from Finding Nemo.
BUSINESS
June 13, 1986 | By Tom Belden, Inquirer Staff Writer
Like a theatrical director preparing for opening night, Rick Williams was practically running from one deck to another aboard the Ocean Princess yesterday, a few hours after it docked for the first time at its new home port of Penn's Landing. Among other tasks, Williams, the president of Ocean Cruise Lines Inc. of Fort Lauderdale, Fla., which owns the sleek, white cruise ship, was monitoring the activities of a crew of 250 aboard a luxury vessel that carries 460 passengers. He also oversaw the unloading of 12 truckloads of meat, poultry and fresh fruits and vegetables, and dozens of cases of liquor and other libations for the vessel's forthcoming sailings.
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NEWS
June 26, 2015 | By Erin Edinger-Turoff, Inquirer Staff Writer
For Ignacio Garcia Du Quesne and Philippe H. Despointes, this year's Tall Ships Festival isn't just a celebration of maritime splendors - it's a chance for them to reconnect with their Revolutionary War roots. Both men trace their family lines back to crew of the French warship Hermione, which in 1780 carried the Marquis de Lafayette and his forces to join the Americans in their nascent revolution. A replica of the historical warship - built using its sister ship's original plans, and tools, techniques, and materials of the era - will be at Penn's Landing for the Tall Ships Festival, which starts Thursday and ends Sunday.
TRAVEL
March 11, 2012 | By James Lileks, MINNEAPOLIS STAR TRIBUNE
We took a cruise with 912 children, 911 of whom were not ours. For people who don't like other people's kids in such quantities, or who believe that cruise ships are floating tubs of gluttony and indolence, this must all sound like a nightmare. There was a moment when the poolside noise level was enough to make Davy Jones himself swim up to the surface and tell us to hold it down, but Davy Jones was actually at the party. At least everyone went quiet when the ship launched the fireworks.
NEWS
February 28, 2012 | By Jason Straziuso and Frances D'Emilio, Associated Press
NAIROBI, Kenya - An Italian cruise liner carrying more than 1,000 people was adrift without power in the pirate-infested Indian Ocean on Monday after a fire erupted in its generator room. The blaze, which was extinguished, caused no injuries, officials said. Two tug boats from the island nation of Seychelles were steaming toward the drifting Costa Allegra, which had 636 passengers and 413 crew members on board, but they were not expected to arrive until Tuesday afternoon at the earliest.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 8, 2010
WHEN THE OASIS of the Seas sailed into Fort Lauderdale, Fla., in 2009, it did so under the spotlight of the world media, which ogled and, yes, even fawned over the largest ship at sea. After its sister ship, the Allure of the Seas, arrived in the same port last month, it was mentioned as one of TV talk host Oprah Winfrey's favorite things, but it hardly created the fuss that the Oasis did. Yet Allure closely resembles the Oasis. Royal Caribbean's newest Oasis-class ships offer seven distinct neighborhoods, 16 decks, 2,700 staterooms in a variety of classes and unique technological innovations.
NEWS
May 23, 2010 | By David G. Molyneaux FOR THE INQUIRER
More than 10 years have passed since Walt Disney Co. made a major splash in the cruise world with its first two ships, Disney Magic and Disney Wonder. Come January, the company known best for its theme parks will roll out a third ship, the Disney Dream. It will feature animated bells and whistles that parents and children will find nowhere else at sea. Imagine enchanted pictures on the walls - some will interact with passengers - and interior cabins with an active porthole view of the ocean and an occasional visit by a starfish from Finding Nemo.
NEWS
March 30, 2003 | By Nancy Petersen INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
At 11:20 yesterday morning, the first vessel to be built at the former Philadelphia Naval Shipyard in more than three decades floated. Welder Kim Gibbons cried, then raced to call her mother, who was standing on the New Jersey side of the river ready to film the historic event. "Pull that big boy out of here," yelled health and safety officer Jim Lewis. Then he said in a near whisper: "I never thought I'd see it happen. " To cheers from a proud and somewhat awestruck corps of workers at what is now the Kvaerner Philadelphia Shipyard, the container ship Manukai, aided by a fleet of five tugboats, floated out of a flooded dry dock into the Delaware River, and then was maneuvered into another nearby dock for its final construction phase.
NEWS
October 5, 2002 | By Larry Fish INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
This is the ship made for those whose ship has already come in. The World of ResidenSea, a floating condominium for millionaires with wanderlust, was to leave New York at dawn today and tie up at South Philadelphia's Tioga Marine Terminal at 8 a.m. for a brief sales call. By dusk, she'll be under way again, heading south to Savannah, Ga., on her endless travels around the globe. The World is designed as a luxurious retelling of the maritime legend of the Flying Dutchman, a hapless vessel doomed to wander the seas forever, never reaching home.
NEWS
September 29, 1999 | By Jack Brown, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
For more than 30 years, Jerry Shaw has been painstakingly reproducing the USS Forrestal. He laid the 12-foot keel of his model in 1965, with carefully warped strips of basswood, overlaid it with a coating of fiberglass, and began to build the superstructure with strips of aluminum and brass. Every deck drain, every landing light, every strip of railing had to be modeled with exacting drill and file and paint work, every airplane and catwalk built from bits of plastic and rubber and brass.
NEWS
December 2, 1990 | By Donald D. Groff, Special to The Inquirer
With the reunification of Germany, I've heard there are plans for an Elbe River cruise. Where can I get a schedule? R.B., Newtown After 45 years of separating Eastern and Western Europe, the Elbe River will have a unifying role of sorts as river-tour traffic emerges. EuropAmerica Cruises has announced plans to launch a ship, the Prussian Princess, for Elbe cruises beginning in March. The Elbe flows 725 miles from Czechoslovakia to northern Germany, and EuropAmerica says the Prussian Princess will be the first overnight cruise ship on the river.
NEWS
May 6, 1989 | By Susan Levine, Inquirer Staff Writer
Glasnost hit the Freedom Trail yesterday. It was not your usual shuttle diplomacy. The Soviet visitors were not high- ranking ambassadors but men and women from a Soviet factory ship that for nearly four months has been stationed 2 miles off the Massachusetts coast processing herring. They rode not in police-escorted limousines but in brown-and-yellow Yankee Coach buses that vied with all the other buses and weekday traffic on city streets. And they visited the birthplace of America - from the Old North Church to the USS Constitution to the gold-domed Statehouse on Beacon Hill - without the usual rich stories about Paul Revere, "One if by land, two if by sea" and the like.
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