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Sister Souljah

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NEWS
June 18, 1992
Something important is missing from all the postgame analysis, after-action reports and general bull-shooting that's going on surrounding Sister Souljah's inflammatory racial remarks, and Bill Clinton's response to them. It is this: What she said was morally wrong. And whatever political gamesmanship may (or may not) have been involved in Mr. Clinton's condemnation of those remarks during his speech to the Rev. Jesse Jackson's Rainbow Coalition, the apparent Democratic presidential nominee was right to have called the rap performer to account.
NEWS
June 27, 1992 | By ROGER E. HERNANDEZ
The Jesse Jackson-Bill Clinton fight over rap singer Sister Souljah is the perfect symbol of the great American tragedy. Racial animosity clouds our thinking so much that we fail to see issues for what they are. Each man did what he thought he had to do. And in Politics '92, that means playing the race card. Clinton's attack on the rapper was meant to show white voters that here was, at last, a Democrat who could stand up to black "special interests. " And Jackson's counterattack was meant to show his black supporters no white politician was going to come to the Rainbow Coalition, criticize a black person, and get away with it. In a sane world, decent people of all ethnic groups would condemn the racist ranting of Souljah.
NEWS
June 19, 1992 | By RICHARD COHEN
It is the rare politician who tells an audience what it does not want to hear. A willingness to do just that commended Paul Tsongas to the primary voters of New Hampshire. For a time, he stood in bold contrast to, among others, George Herbert Walker Bush, who would say "kitty, kitty" to a dog if he thought there were any votes in it. As for Ross Perot, his vaunted candor has been swallowed by his ambition. Recently, he's been giving phonies a bad name. That brings us to Bill Clinton, the supposedly "Slick Willy" of yore.
NEWS
June 14, 1992 | By Reed Karaim, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Arkansas Gov. Bill Clinton created a furor at a meeting of the Rev. Jesse Jackson's National Rainbow Coalition yesterday when he criticized a young black rap singer as a voice of racism. Clinton called racial comments by rapper Sister Souljah, made to the Washington Post shortly after the Los Angeles riots, examples of "the kind of hatred we do not honor. " Jackson defended the singer, who appeared on a panel at the coalition meeting Friday. He said she had been misquoted.
NEWS
June 16, 1992 | by Jonathan Takiff, Daily News Staff Writer Tom Maurstad of the Dallas Morning News contributed to this story
As a solo rap provocateur and the newest voice of Public Enemy, militant "raptivist" Sister Souljah wants to kick your butt, but good. If her words draw blood, or bring a heated response - as they did last weekend from presidential candidate Bill Clinton - so much the better. Such muck-raking is clearly fulfilling her mission. "Sister Souljah will not have the normal, pacified 'State of Accommodation' reaction to events and issues," she announced in a manifesto delivered with her recently released debut album, "360 Degrees of Power" (Epic)
NEWS
June 16, 1992 | Daily News Wire Services Compiled by staff writer Ron Goldwyn from reports by the Associated Press, Reuters and other news services
For Democrat Bill Clinton, rapping the rapper has become part of a wider strategy of telling various groups - especially core Democratic constituencies - things they might not want to hear. Clinton's rift with Jesse Jackson over a criticism of rap artist Sister Souljah deepened with every talk-show appearance yesterday. Meanwhile, the likely Democratic nominee turned bad-news-bearer to the labor movement. Clinton explained to a United Auto Workers session in San Diego why he supports a free-trade pact with Mexico - an agreement labor believes will cost American jobs.
BUSINESS
July 30, 1992 | by Jenice M. Armstrong, Daily News Staff Writer
To the average American, Ice-T once was something they drank with lemon. But that was before police unions protested the rap artist's song "Cop Killer. " Since then, Ice-T has been vaunted into national prominence. He even was blasted publicly by Vice President Dan Quayle. On Tuesday, Time Warner Inc.'s Warner Brothers Records announced plans to pull the song from Ice-T's "Body Count" album at the performer's request. The rapper said he agreed to withdraw the song to shield Time Warner from further criticism.
NEWS
June 19, 1992
LIFE WITHOUT BARKLEY The Bad Boy of basketball, Charles Barkley, is moving west, and with him goes a turbulent time in the history of Philadelphia sports. Charles spent the last eight years wreaking havoc on and off the court with the 76ers, in sharp contrast to the quiet elegance of the superstar he replaced, Julius Erving. The brash Alabaman spat on fans, carried a handgun in his car and mixed it up with his detractors in the stands and on the streets. So Harold Katz, who put up with such antics for quite a spell, finally had to come to terms with his dilemma, much like the one Norman Braman faced with Buddy Ryan; after Mr. Katz jettisoned his coach, Jimmy Lynam, and hired a new one, Doug Moe, the handwriting was on the backboard: Charles had to go The merits of this week's trade with the Phoenix Suns will probably be argued by Sixers fans ad nauseum.
NEWS
July 8, 1992
RIGHT ON, SISTER SOULJAH, FOR TELLING THE TRUTH Jack McKinney in his June 17 column concurs with Democratic presidential candidate Bill Clinton by labeling black "raptivist" Sister Souljah a racist of a degree "similar to Klansman David Duke. " The hypocritical audacity of the Caucasian mind never fails to amaze me. Racism as an institution (others include sexism, classism, religion, politics, the military, the media, etc.) that works interactively in a broad comprehensive interlocking network to insure that white racial supremacy is perpetuated, and enhanced through denial of access of non-whites to adequate affordable housing, education, jobs, medical care, economic opportunity, etc. Thus neither Sister Souljah or any other non-white can be properly labeled "racist" - prejudiced maybe, but not racist.
NEWS
June 17, 1992 | BY JACK MCKINNEY
If a guest in my house were to suggest there ought to be a week set aside for insulting black people, I wouldn't argue the point. I would personally throw the bum out. Personally, as in physically. Anyone who knows me - black, white, Asian, Hispanic - will realize I'm serious about this. I boxed in a gym in Strawberry Mansion, where Denny Heffernan and I were the only white guys. One afternoon, a stranger off the streets went for my back with a switch- blade knife.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
March 24, 2013
The Porsche Santiaga Story Atria/Emily Bestler Books. 432 pp. $26.99 By Sister Souljah Reviewed by Karen E. Quinones Miller It's here! A Deeper Love Inside: The Porsche Santiaga Story , the long-awaited sequel to Sister Souljah's 1999 debut novel, The Coldest Winter Ever , which sold more than a million copies, is finally here! And it was released with even more fanfare than the 2008 publication of Midnight: A Gangster Love Story , the prequel to The Coldest Winter Ever that centers on the Sudanese immigrant Midnight, who was introduced in Coldest Winter . It's little wonder that this sequel, like the prequel, made an early appearance on the New York Times best-sellers list, especially since fans of The Coldest Winter Ever had to wait 14 years to find out the fate of the characters in that book.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 29, 2013 | By Dan Gross
  LeSEAN McCOY says he is "deeply sorry and remorseful" for the fallout following the explicit Twitter feud he waged with his baby mama "Steph" over the weekend. The Eagles running back's apologized Monday to his family, the Philadelphia Eagles, his fans, and "every young person who views me as a role model. " Initially, McCoy claimed his account was hacked and removed his Twitter page. "This is not who I am as a person, nor the image I ever wanted to portray of myself. It's definitely not the example I want to set for my son," McCoy said in a statement released by his personal reps.
LIVING
February 2, 1995 | By Jennifer Weiner, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Sister Souljah sat behind a table at the Ayinde cultural center in West Philadelphia, looking deep into the eyes of one of her fans. "Always love yourself, girl," she said. She squeezed the woman's hands hard, and repeated her message. "Always love yourself. " Then she stood, leaned over the table, and gave the woman a hug. You'd have a hard time recognizing this slender young woman, her hair elaborately braided and coiled, an oversized black leather jacket hanging over her chair and a diamond wedding band flashing on her finger, as the shrill "raptivist" of 1992 - the one who drew then-presidential candidate Bill Clinton's ire for suggesting that "if black people kill black people every day, why not have a week and kill white people?"
NEWS
January 20, 1994 | by Ishmael Reed, From the New York Times
When President Clinton speaks at black and Latino churches about escalating violence in their communities, on the face of it this effort to reach out would seem to be a compassionate gesture. I voted for Clinton because I believed that he was capable of compassion. But when I read that Stanley Greenberg, Clinton's pollster, approved of these appearances, I became suspicious. According to news reports, Greenberg was in part responsible for the episode during the presidential campaign in which Clinton publicly scolded Jesse Jackson for inviting the rap artist Sister Souljah to appear before a meeting of the Rainbow Coalition after she rapped some lyrics that some interpreted as anti-white.
NEWS
February 2, 1993 | By Dwight Ott, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Sister Souljah, the fiery rapper who was attacked by President Clinton last May for remarks about the Los Angeles riots, last night criticized Clinton and the Rev. Jesse Jackson, and referred to former President George Bush as "my kind of man. " Souljah said Jackson didn't stand firmly by her after the incident. Speaking at the Rutgers University-Camden Campus at the start of Black History Month activities, Souljah told the racially mixed audience, "George Bush was my kind of guy. " The reason, she explained: "He made it eminently clear he was a white racist and didn't care who knew it. . . . " The only difference between Bush and Clinton, she said, is that Clinton has a smiling, friendly attitude toward blacks, while continuing similar policies to Bush's.
NEWS
November 23, 1992 | By Robert A. Rankin, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU This article contains information from the Associated Press
As the President-elect listened from the front pew, the Rev. Jesse Jackson yesterday hailed Bill Clinton's election as "the dawn of a new day" in a passionate sermon at a suburban Little Rock church. Burying any hard feelings that developed during the campaign, Jackson said that Clinton, governor of Arkansas, represented the New South for which civil rights heroes had died, and that he offered Americans a "New Covenant" based on mutual responsibility. Addressing nearly 500 people at St. Theresa's Roman Catholic Church, Jackson was nearly effusive in his praise of Clinton.
BUSINESS
July 30, 1992 | by Jenice M. Armstrong, Daily News Staff Writer
To the average American, Ice-T once was something they drank with lemon. But that was before police unions protested the rap artist's song "Cop Killer. " Since then, Ice-T has been vaunted into national prominence. He even was blasted publicly by Vice President Dan Quayle. On Tuesday, Time Warner Inc.'s Warner Brothers Records announced plans to pull the song from Ice-T's "Body Count" album at the performer's request. The rapper said he agreed to withdraw the song to shield Time Warner from further criticism.
NEWS
July 8, 1992
RIGHT ON, SISTER SOULJAH, FOR TELLING THE TRUTH Jack McKinney in his June 17 column concurs with Democratic presidential candidate Bill Clinton by labeling black "raptivist" Sister Souljah a racist of a degree "similar to Klansman David Duke. " The hypocritical audacity of the Caucasian mind never fails to amaze me. Racism as an institution (others include sexism, classism, religion, politics, the military, the media, etc.) that works interactively in a broad comprehensive interlocking network to insure that white racial supremacy is perpetuated, and enhanced through denial of access of non-whites to adequate affordable housing, education, jobs, medical care, economic opportunity, etc. Thus neither Sister Souljah or any other non-white can be properly labeled "racist" - prejudiced maybe, but not racist.
NEWS
June 30, 1992 | by Mark de la Vina, Daily News Staff Writer
If it's not a comic book, it's a rap song. Just as the U.S. Senate conducted hearings in 1955 on how comic books contributed to juvenile delinquency, today's powers that be - George Bush, Dan Quayle and Bill Clinton - have in recent weeks tagged rap artists Ice-T and Sister Souljah as modern violators of moral decency. Sister Souljah promotes racism, the Democrats' presidential candidate proclaimed; Ice-T condones the murder of police on his song "Cop Killer," the president and vice president have clamored.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 28, 1992 | By Tom Moon, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Last week, as his song "Cop Killer" escalated into a national security issue, Ice-T delivered what, in the world of rap music, amounts to a monumental statement. For weeks, the cut from the Los Angeles artist's four-month-old album Body Count had been inspiring the wrath of Vice President Quayle, the governor of Alabama and police associations nationwide with its call to "die die die pig die. " A boycott of all music distributed by Warner Bros., Ice-T's recording label, was called for. Warner Bros.
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