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Sistine Chapel

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NEWS
February 1, 1987 | By Jane Eisner, Inquirer Staff writer
This revolution in the world of art, this controversial discovery about one of the greatest creations of the Renaissance, began with a look six years ago at someone's knee. Gianluigi Colalucci saw it first. As chief conservator for the Vatican Museums, he had spent six months perched on scaffolding 20 meters high - 66 feet - with the awesome job of trying to clean one small part of Michelangelo's famous painting on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel. When he finished, Colalucci covered the restored area with a curtain and removed the scaffolding to get ready to show the restoration to his superiors.
NEWS
April 3, 2015 | BY DAN GERINGER, Daily News Staff Writer geringd@phillynews.com, 215-854-5961
JESSE KRIMES, an artist from Lancaster County, was sentenced in 2009 to five years in federal prison for possession of powdered cocaine with intent to distribute. His new neighbors were the Aryan Brotherhood, the Mexican Mafia and other prison gangs. "I thought to myself, 'Where the hell am I?' " said Krimes, 32, a free man since last year, sitting in his Spring Garden studio in Olivet Covenant Church's former Sunday school. "I asked myself, 'How am I going to survive?' " He survived for a year at the Federal Correctional Complex in Butner, N.C., by drawing portraits of gang members, who sent them home to their loved ones.
NEWS
March 9, 1992
LITIGIOUS We understand that of the dozen or so people aboard the two buses involved in a SEPTA collision last week, 421 were injured. - Rick Selvin. NONPROFIT My friend works for a nonprofit organization, General Motors. - Don Weir, Media. DESPERATE DEMS The Democrats are so divided, Mario Cuomo could announce after the Democratic National Convention adjourns and still get the nomination. - Leon Czikowsky. GOING FOR THE GOLD In the Winter Olympics, the USA won 11 medals and Japan only seven.
NEWS
November 11, 2003
Let the art experts quibble. Let them argue about methods for restoring masterpieces. Just past is squabbling over restoring Michelangelo's 16th century frescoes in the Sistine Chapel. The current kerfuffle is over the cleaning of Michelangelo's David. For David, the wet method (using a sort-of mud mask over rice paper on some parts; mineral-doused cotton swabs on others) has triumphed over a dry method featuring soft cloths, brushes and erasers - without the giant-slayer's marble skin so far being the worse for it. A dash of perspective is in order.
NEWS
July 18, 2007
THE RECENT erection of the sculpture "The Iroquois" by Mark di Suvero on the Parkway demonstrates once again that Philly is brain-dead when it comes to understanding what is and isn't art. The only difference between I-beam sculptures like Suvero's and demolition rubble: His are painted. The effect of sculptures like "The Iroquois" on tourism is best demonstrated by a visit to Sistine Chapel in Rome. A series of modern paintings are hung in the stairway corridors. In my many visits, the majority of visitors rush through the hallways to get to the main hall.
NEWS
March 9, 2013 | By Ann Rodgers, PITTSBURGH POST-GAZETTE
VATICAN CITY -- The Vatican Friday is expected to announce the date that the cardinals will enter the Sistine Chapel to begin voting for a new pope. The announcement is expected shortly after 1 p..m. EST. The Rev. Federico Lombardi, spokesman for the Vatican, told reporters that the cardinals are expected to make the decision early Friday evening in Rome, which is six hours ahead of Eastern Standard time. Father Lombardi, who attends the cardinals meetings and is permitted to give vague summaries to the media, said that the conclave will not begin this weekend.
NEWS
May 31, 1998 | By Louise Harbach, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Jeramy Sims learned the hard way: Never be absent on the day class assignments are handed out. "If you do, you'll end up playing Jesus, like me," said Sims, a senior culinary-arts student at the Burlington County Institute of Technology, after he learned that he would be portraying Jesus in The Michelangelo Project. Sims portrayed Jesus in the arms of Mary in La Pieta, one of the greatest of Michelangelo's sculptures, while his classmates brought to life 11 other famous works by the famed Renaissance sculptor and painter, including the Madonna of the Stairs, Moses, David, Madonna with Child, and the Creation on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel.
NEWS
August 20, 1996 | by Scott Flander Scott Flander is a Daily News staff writer
Philadelphia is capturing the art world by storm; artists everywhere are gasping. Everyone is talking, of course, about the Rocky statue. This summer, the Daily News is asking readers where they think the statue should find a permanent home. Currently, it's on display at the Arena Formerly Known as the Spectrum, but the statue is too great a treasure to stay there forever. Does Rome hide the Sistine Chapel? Does Paris hide the Mona Lisa? To help our quest, we've asked people in Philadelphia's art world where they think the statue should go. Some dare to suggest that Rocky is nothing more than a movie prop.
NEWS
February 13, 2013
Pope Benedict XVI, a man closely associated with orthodoxy, has announced that he will take the unorthodox step of voluntarily relinquishing his immense power as head of the Roman Catholic Church. The 85-year-old pope confessed that his "strengths, due to an advanced age, are no longer suited to an adequate exercise of the Petrine ministry. " One wonders how many U.S. senators are nervously contemplating the prospect that even the Holy See now takes a more forward-looking and humble view of retirement from office than they do. Despite Benedict's staunchly conservative reputation and background as head of the Vatican office overseeing church doctrine, this was not his first break with precedent - in this case the precedent, unbroken for six centuries, that popes leave the position only when they leave this world.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 31, 2016 | By Samantha Melamed, Staff Writer
A decade ago, Andrew Hottle, a professor of art history at Rowan University, undertook what he thought was a mundane task: finding an image to show his class of The Sister Chapel , a feminist art collaboration from the 1970s. He had come across a brief article about the work, but as he searched for more information, he found little had been written about the exhibition or the artists. A few were well-known - the most famous was painter Alice Neel - but others he had never heard of. And the artwork itself was nowhere to be found.
TRAVEL
December 27, 2015
We often are asked how we find special destinations or unearth unique sights and experiences on our journeys. In almost five years of constant travel, we've picked up a few tips (many of which we've shared in this column). However, the real secret is not what we find, but how we travel. Every year, we review our travels and remind ourselves of a few simple techniques that allow us to enjoy a richer travel experience. Here are our New Year's resolutions: Skip the crowds . Popular sights are diminished by hordes of people.
NEWS
August 1, 2015 | By Erin Edinger-Turoff, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Philadelphia Historical Commission has unanimously designated as historic the frescoes of St. Augustine Roman Catholic Church, the oldest of their kind in this country. They were painted in 1848, one year after the church, at 243 N. Lawrence St., alongside the Ben Franklin Bridge, was rebuilt. It was burned down during anti-Catholic riots in 1844, a time when Irish immigrants largely made up its thousands of parishioners. It's remarkable, historians say, that the frescoes have survived to the present day. "The Lord Seeth," inscribed above a massive fresco depicting the Crucifixion, appears at the front altar of the Old City church, built in a style reminiscent of Roman cathedrals.
NEWS
June 5, 2015 | BY JENNIFER WRIGHT, Daily News Staff Writer wrightj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5938
A collection of Vatican artifacts will be arriving just in time for the Papal visit, but not in the pontiff's carry-on bag. The Franklin Institute is set to host "Vatican Splendors," an exhibit showcasing 200 objects spanning Vatican history, the museum announced Friday. "In 109 days the world is coming," said Donna Crilley Farrell, executive director of the World Meeting of Families. "This is going to be truly one of the showpieces. " About 80 of the relics in the exhibit, opening Sept.
NEWS
April 3, 2015 | BY DAN GERINGER, Daily News Staff Writer geringd@phillynews.com, 215-854-5961
JESSE KRIMES, an artist from Lancaster County, was sentenced in 2009 to five years in federal prison for possession of powdered cocaine with intent to distribute. His new neighbors were the Aryan Brotherhood, the Mexican Mafia and other prison gangs. "I thought to myself, 'Where the hell am I?' " said Krimes, 32, a free man since last year, sitting in his Spring Garden studio in Olivet Covenant Church's former Sunday school. "I asked myself, 'How am I going to survive?' " He survived for a year at the Federal Correctional Complex in Butner, N.C., by drawing portraits of gang members, who sent them home to their loved ones.
NEWS
March 16, 2013 | By Orlando R. Barone
Just after Jorge Mario Bergoglio became Pope Francis, I received a text from my son: "I guess I took the right Confirmation name. " Last year, at age 33, Nick was confirmed in the Catholic faith, and he adopted the name of Francis in honor of Francis of Assisi. I remember asking him why. "The guy was crazy, Dad. " Not an auspicious start, but I listened on. "You know, he was from a pretty well-to-do family. He rejected everything, wouldn't even wear shoes. " "You're not thinking of going shoeless.
NEWS
March 15, 2013 | By Nicole Winfield, Associated Press
VATICAN CITY - On his first day as shepherd of the world's 1.2 billion Catholics, Pope Francis picked up his luggage at a Vatican hotel, personally thanked each member of the staff, and even paid his own bill. Then, at his first Mass, he delivered a short, unscripted homily - in Italian, not the Latin of his predecessor - holding the cardinals who elected him responsible for keeping the church strong. Pope for barely 12 hours, Francis brushed off years of tradition and formality Thursday with a remarkable break in style that sent a clear message that his papacy is poised to reject many of the trappings enjoyed by the now-retired Benedict XVI. That was hardly out of character for Francis.
NEWS
March 14, 2013 | By Nicole Winfield, Associated Press
VATICAN CITY - This time there was no doubt. There was no new pope yet, and the mystery of who - and when - was as thick as the unmistakable heavy black smoke billowing from the Sistine Chapel chimney. As thousands waited in a cold night rain in St. Peter's Square, the cardinals signaled Tuesday that they had failed on their first attempt to find a leader for the world's 1.2 billion Catholics and their troubled church. "It's black, it's black, it's waaay black!" screamed Eliza Nagle, a 21-year-old Notre Dame theology major on an exchange program in Rome, as the smoke poured from the 6-foot-high copper chimney.
NEWS
March 14, 2013 | By Jeff Gammage, Aubrey Whelan and Sulaiman Abdur-Rahman, INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Maria Travaglio wept with joy when news came that a Latino had been chosen as pope. "It's about time," said the Philadelphia Archdiocese Catholic Social Services worker, who born and raised in Argentina. "I can't believe it. Wow. " Travaglio was crying tears of happiness in the Cathedral Basilica of Saints Peter and Paul in Philadelphia, where she and others gathered to watch the announcement. Across the Philadelphia region, Catholics rejoiced and non-Catholics took notice, the world seeming to stop for a moment for the selection of a new pope: Pope Francis, the former Cardinal Bergoglio.
NEWS
March 13, 2013 | BY ROCCO PALMO & SEAN COLLINS WALSH, For the Daily News Daily News Staff Writer walshSE@phillynews.com, 215-854-4172
CARDINAL Justin Rigali, the former archbishop of Philadelphia, is the only papal elector with strong local ties - but his role in the conclave may not be limited to a single tally. Rigali, a Los Angeles native, is playing a big role in unifying the American cardinals and unlocking their potential influence over who will be the next pope. Despite being the second-largest national group in the conclave for decades, Americans have not traditionally wielded much clout behind the closed doors of the Sistine Chapel - in part because they rarely voted as a bloc.
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