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NEWS
February 5, 1998 | by Melanie C. Redmond, For the Daily News
Valentine's Day is Saturday, Feb. 14, and stores are selling tons of flowers and candy. But how many know the holiday's real history? Legend has it that the holiday became St. Valentine's Day in honor of a priest in ancient Rome. Emperor Claudius II had forbidden Roman soldiers to marry; he thought it would make them weak. Valentine ignored the emperor's decree and secretly married the young couples. He was arrested, and while in prison converted a prison guard and his family to Christianity.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 22, 2011 | By Lini S. Kadaba, For The Inquirer
Money changes everything. In many ways, the provocatively named WhatsYourPrice.com, launched three months ago, is just like any other online dating site. Women and men post sexy, glamorous pictures, write witty snippets about themselves that massage reality, and request fun, romantic dates with the man or woman of their dreams. Except that so-called generous members (mostly men) open their wallets and bid real money for a first date with members who list themselves in the "attractive" category (mostly women)
NEWS
April 21, 1988 | By Jan Hefler, Special to The Inquirer
The Pennsauken Township Committee last night decided to locate a proposed $6.4 million municipal building and senior citizen housing complex at the former site of the Walt Whitman Theater on 47th Street at Westfield Avenue. Plans call for the first floor, with 18,000 square feet of space, to serve as the municipal center. On the remaining six floors would be about 80 apartments for the elderly. Financial consultant Fred Greene said the township would rent the municipal center from a group of real estate investors for approximately $127,000 a year.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 23, 2015 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
They've found musket balls and shell fragments, the expected refuse of battle. Archaeologists and volunteers combing the grounds of the Red Bank Battlefield this month have unearthed at least 150 artifacts, about 50 of them tied to the crucial Revolutionary War fight 238 years ago. But they have also discovered objects with a more personal, human connection, said Wade Catts, regional cultural director of JMA, a division of Commonwealth Cultural...
NEWS
June 21, 2015 | By Dan McQuade, For The Inquirer
STONE HARBOR, N.J. - Less than 50 years ago, there were more herons than vacationers in southern Stone Harbor. Southern Seven Mile Island was recognized as a "veritable paradise for birds" as early as the late 19th century. As many as 9,000 herons nested at the Stone Harbor Bird Sanctuary in the 1960s and early 1970s - an incredible number for a 21-acre site, according to Wetlands Institute executive director Lenore Tedesco. But by 1983, there were only about 1,000 birds, as the site had fallen victim to overdevelopment and the intrusion of invasive species.
BUSINESS
June 17, 2015 | By Jacob Adelman, Inquirer Staff Writer
Target Corp. will open in miniature at the Boyd Theater development site, tapping Center City's growing base of workers and residents amid the retailer's nationwide introduction of smaller shops tailored to urban storefronts. The Minneapolis-based company will open a TargetExpress store at 19th and Chestnut Streets in July 2016, offering fresh groceries, cellphone supplies, beauty items, and other goods in a retail building near the 1920s-era movie palace's facade, company spokeswoman Erika Winkels said Monday.
BUSINESS
June 4, 2015 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
One of the world's leading managers of electricity networks on Tuesday agreed to open a research center in partnership with Pennsylvania State University at the Navy Yard, reinforcing its emergence as a smart-energy campus. Alstom Grid, a unit of French industrial giant Alstom, will open the Microgrid Center of Excellence at the Navy Yard in South Philadelphia. The center will be involved in the deployment of new technologies related to "microgrids," which are localized electrical systems that can operate autonomously from the regional power grid.
NEWS
June 2, 2015 | By Jan Hefler, Inquirer Staff Writer
The planned demolition of an 1890 mansion once owned by a founder of U.S. Pipe may pale in comparison to another razing that took place at the Burlington City site about 100 years ago, after the stately home had been converted to company offices. The mansion, a three-story Colonial Revival-style building on the Delaware River, was occupied by Andrew McNeal and his family until 1899, when he sold his company to the U.S. Cast Iron Pipe and Foundry, according to an application the city submitted to have the building placed on the state and federal Registers of Historic Places.
NEWS
May 30, 2015 | By Michaelle Bond, Inquirer Staff Writer
Bill Minahan recalls when his portable emergency radio failed while he was at a house fire a few years ago. The deputy chief of the volunteer Lionville Fire Company had to run to his car and use the mounted radio to tell county dispatchers about a woman police had rescued. First responders know there are certain places in the more than 750 square miles of Chester County where their portable radios probably will not work. So the county is working to upgrade its radio network to improve communications among its more than 5,000 first responders.
BUSINESS
May 28, 2015 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia wants to buy the 27-acre property known as International Plaza on Route 291 in Tinicum Township, Delaware County, as part of a long-range expansion of Philadelphia International Airport. An ordinance was introduced in City Council on Thursday, paving the way for the city-owned airport to purchase the complex, which has two office buildings that were once the corporate headquarters of Scott Paper Co. The former Scott Plaza site is owned by a joint venture of affiliates of New York-based private equity firm Angelo Gordon & Co. and Amerimar Enterprises Inc., a commercial real estate development and management company.
TRAVEL
May 25, 2015 | By Susan Miller, For The Inquirer
My father, Maurice "Moose" Berry, was in the 104th Regiment, 26th Infantry Division and fought in the Ardennes, where he was wounded, and in the Battle of the Bulge. Over the years, he revisited places where he had seen combat, and he toured American Battle Monument Cemeteries with my mother and my husband. In 2005, he photographed the grave markers of all the men of the 26th who lost their lives in Europe. When my father told me in November 2013 he wanted to return, I wanted to go with him. We planned our visit to coincide with the 2014 Memorial Day ceremony at the Lorraine Cemetery in St. Avold, France; with more than 10,000 military dead interred, it's the largest American burial site in Europe.
NEWS
May 19, 2015 | By Mari A. Schaefer, Inquirer Staff Writer
Laura Finamore, Jim Gaines, Abid Gilani, Robert Gildersleeve, Derrick E. Griffith, Rachel Jacobs, Giuseppe Piras, Justin Zemser. As each name was read, a bell rang out and white dove of peace was released into the afternoon sky. Dozens of first responders, volunteers, neighbors as well as city, state, and federal officials gathered Sunday near the site of Tuesday's Amtrak derailment for a service of remembrance and reflection for those who...
NEWS
May 19, 2015
City, state and federal leaders will gather at Frankford Junction, the site of the derailment of Amtrak Train 188, for a service of reflection at 5 p.m. Sunday. Gov. Tom Wolf, Mayor Nutter and U.S. Transportation Secretary Anthony Foxx will be joined by U.S. Rep. Bob Brady and by Sen. Tom Carper of Delaware, in remembering the eight people who were killed in the May 12 crash at Frankford Avenue and Wheatsheaf Lane in Port Richmond. Amtrak chief executive Joseph Boardman and Renee Cardwell Hughes, chief executive of the American Red Cross of Southeastern Pennsylvania, will also be in attendance.
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