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NEWS
February 5, 1998 | by Melanie C. Redmond, For the Daily News
Valentine's Day is Saturday, Feb. 14, and stores are selling tons of flowers and candy. But how many know the holiday's real history? Legend has it that the holiday became St. Valentine's Day in honor of a priest in ancient Rome. Emperor Claudius II had forbidden Roman soldiers to marry; he thought it would make them weak. Valentine ignored the emperor's decree and secretly married the young couples. He was arrested, and while in prison converted a prison guard and his family to Christianity.
NEWS
September 5, 2016 | By Tom Avril, Staff Writer
Nearly 500 miles in the sky above northern Siberia, two satellites collided with violent force Feb. 10, 2009, shattering into at least 2,000 fragments that continue to orbit Earth. And those are just the ones we know about. Scientists estimate there are hundreds of thousands of undetected objects in space resulting from collisions such as that one, and from the deterioration of old rocket boosters, dead satellites, and other stray hardware. That is the reason behind a squat, white structure that opened this year near Route 38 in Moorestown, at the South Jersey campus of Lockheed Martin Corp.
NEWS
April 21, 1988 | By Jan Hefler, Special to The Inquirer
The Pennsauken Township Committee last night decided to locate a proposed $6.4 million municipal building and senior citizen housing complex at the former site of the Walt Whitman Theater on 47th Street at Westfield Avenue. Plans call for the first floor, with 18,000 square feet of space, to serve as the municipal center. On the remaining six floors would be about 80 apartments for the elderly. Financial consultant Fred Greene said the township would rent the municipal center from a group of real estate investors for approximately $127,000 a year.
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TRAVEL
September 5, 2016
Molokai. The colony at Kalaupapa was established in the 19th century and operated until 1969. At its peak, it was home to about 1,200 people. A few of the exiles still live there.  
NEWS
September 5, 2016 | By Tom Avril, Staff Writer
Nearly 500 miles in the sky above northern Siberia, two satellites collided with violent force Feb. 10, 2009, shattering into at least 2,000 fragments that continue to orbit Earth. And those are just the ones we know about. Scientists estimate there are hundreds of thousands of undetected objects in space resulting from collisions such as that one, and from the deterioration of old rocket boosters, dead satellites, and other stray hardware. That is the reason behind a squat, white structure that opened this year near Route 38 in Moorestown, at the South Jersey campus of Lockheed Martin Corp.
NEWS
August 28, 2016 | By Jan Hefler, Staff Writer
A year ago, the historic McNeal Mansion in Burlington City faced demolition after a redeveloper said the cost of restoring the fire-damaged building could approach $10 million. At the time, the city's historic preservation commissioners said they were saddened that the three-story Colonial Revival mansion of Andrew McNeal, who founded what became U.S. Pipe & Foundry Co., might be razed, but seemed resigned to it. But last month, Brahin Properties, the Philadelphia-based redeveloper, bowed out after the city balked at its plans to build a 200-unit townhouse and condominium complex on the 24-acre site.
NEWS
August 23, 2016 | By Dan Geringer, Staff Writer
ARCHBISHOP Charles J. Chaput has decided to close three worship locations in the region, the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Philadelphia announced Sunday. Worshippers learned during weekend services that the St. John of the Cross Church building in Roslyn (Queen of Peace Parish), the Mater Dolorosa Church building in Frankford (Holy Innocents Parish), and the St. Cecilia Church building in Coatesville (Our Lady of the Rosary Parish) will no longer serve as Roman Catholic churches as of Sept.
NEWS
August 13, 2016 | By Jacob Adelman, STAFF WRITER
The owners of Philadelphia's Buffalo Billiards pub have acquired the former site of the Irish Pol in Old City, according to Michael Barmash of Colliers International, who helped broker the deal. Washington-based Pioneer Ventures LLC paid $800,000 for the two-story, 116-year-old property at 45 S. 3rd St., where another bar is anticipated, Barmash said Thursday. The buyers have previously said they plan something at the site akin to the Fishtown Tavern, in which they also have an interest.
TRAVEL
August 8, 2016
Name: Little.Voyage. What it does: This website opens the door to immersive travel through distinctive properties around the world. Hotels are grouped according to category: boutique, eco-friendly, fabulous, hideaway, quirky, and shoestring. What's hot: It's refreshing to search for travel by image and experience rather than destination and date. Next to the photos is essential information, such as closest airport, destination facts, and currency and visa requirements.
REAL_ESTATE
August 8, 2016 | By Alan J. Heavens, REAL ESTATE WRITER
New Kensington Community Development Corp. wasn't sure that "Awesometown" was the right name for its 14-home, mixed-income development lying between Moyer and East Thompson Streets in Fishtown. But Postgreen Homes, which had been "doing interesting things in the neighborhood," in the words of New Kensington executive director Sandy Saltzman, was the partner in the project, and the name "fit into its brand of marketing. " Not surprisingly, "people gravitated to it," Saltzman said, adding that "every time we talk about it, they say that it is 'awesome.' " It is awesome, in many respects, not the least of which is that all 14 homes - 10 market-rate and four affordable - have been sold, even as the four East Thompson Street houses and the driveways for the project are in the final weeks of construction.
NEWS
July 25, 2016 | By David O'Reilly, Staff Writer
Outside a vast brownfield in Gibbstown that is home to crumbling roads, empty storage tanks, and vacant sheds, a modest brick sign points to both the gritty past and the greener prospects of Gloucester County's economy. Repauno Plant shout its bold, stainless steel letters. Below them, the faint outline of a pried off logo whispers a bygone name: DuPont . Home to a DuPont Corp. factory complex that for 120 years manufactured dynamite and the chemicals for making Dacron, the Repauno site belched gas, leaked benzene, shed asbestos, occasionally exploded, and employed thousands, earning it the affectionate nickname "Uncle DuPont" before it shut down nearly 20 years ago. Now a 300-acre section of this 1,700-acre tract on the Delaware River appears destined to become one of the largest privately owned ports in the Northeast.
NEWS
July 23, 2016 | By Aubrey Whelan, Staff Writer
CLEVELAND - Bryan Hambley had never organized a protest before, and so the Cleveland physician made sure to do his research on what to expect at the Republican convention. What he learned alarmed him. Chaos and violence were forecast. Open-carry advocates had vowed to lug loaded assault rifles into the city. Police had recruited dozens of officers from departments across the nation to help handle demonstrations. High security fences rimmed the perimeter of the arena where Donald Trump would accept the nomination.
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