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NEWS
February 5, 1998 | by Melanie C. Redmond, For the Daily News
Valentine's Day is Saturday, Feb. 14, and stores are selling tons of flowers and candy. But how many know the holiday's real history? Legend has it that the holiday became St. Valentine's Day in honor of a priest in ancient Rome. Emperor Claudius II had forbidden Roman soldiers to marry; he thought it would make them weak. Valentine ignored the emperor's decree and secretly married the young couples. He was arrested, and while in prison converted a prison guard and his family to Christianity.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 22, 2011 | By Lini S. Kadaba, For The Inquirer
Money changes everything. In many ways, the provocatively named WhatsYourPrice.com, launched three months ago, is just like any other online dating site. Women and men post sexy, glamorous pictures, write witty snippets about themselves that massage reality, and request fun, romantic dates with the man or woman of their dreams. Except that so-called generous members (mostly men) open their wallets and bid real money for a first date with members who list themselves in the "attractive" category (mostly women)
NEWS
April 21, 1988 | By Jan Hefler, Special to The Inquirer
The Pennsauken Township Committee last night decided to locate a proposed $6.4 million municipal building and senior citizen housing complex at the former site of the Walt Whitman Theater on 47th Street at Westfield Avenue. Plans call for the first floor, with 18,000 square feet of space, to serve as the municipal center. On the remaining six floors would be about 80 apartments for the elderly. Financial consultant Fred Greene said the township would rent the municipal center from a group of real estate investors for approximately $127,000 a year.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
January 20, 2015 | By Laura McCrystal, Inquirer Staff Writer
After scrapping a controversial plan for a hotel, apartments, and retail space on one of the region's most desirable sites, BioMed Realty Trust has returned to Radnor Township with a counterproposal. But officials and residents of the Main Line community say the new plan - for an office park near the heavily traveled intersection of the Blue Route and Lancaster Avenue - is even worse. "The dismay that I feel, it comes from the fact that this is a very sophisticated community and we should be able to come up with a better solution for this site," Commissioner Elaine Schaefer said at last Monday's meeting when the plan was presented.
SPORTS
January 16, 2015
Philadelphia has been selected as the host city for the final of the CONCACAF Gold Cup, according to a source with direct knowledge of the decision. Lincoln Financial Field beat out Baltimore's M&T Bank Stadium, Atlanta's Georgia Dome and most notably East Rutherford, N.J.'s MetLife Stadium. The home of the NFL's New York Giants and Jets had been the overwhelming favorite to host the title game of the signature tournament for North and Central Americans national teams. But officials in Philadelphia worked extremely hard to snatch the big game out of the Meadowlands' grasp.
NEWS
January 9, 2015 | BY JULIE SHAW, Daily News Staff Writer shawj@phillynews.com, 215-854-2592
FORMER IRONWORKERS business agent Edward Sweeney told a federal jury yesterday that 90 percent of the time, he didn't tell his boss Joseph Dougherty about acts of violence or sabotage committed by union members until after the fact. And "no one asked for permission" from Dougherty to commit "night work" - or crimes done on behalf of the union - until after a December 2012 arson at a new Quaker meetinghouse site, which got a little out of hand, he said. But, Sweeney testified under questioning by Assistant U.S. Attorney Robert Livermore that "night work" was spoken about at union meetings, and some members and Dougherty himself expected such things to happen.
SPORTS
January 9, 2015 | By Sam Carchidi, Inquirer Staff Writer
The news shook Flyers center Pierre-Eduoard Bellemare to the core. Twelve people were killed Wednesday when masked gunmen attacked the Paris offices of a satirical news magazine that has published cartoons of the Muslim prophet Muhammad. "I woke up this morning to hear the news, and it seemed too crazy to be real," Bellemare, who was raised in Paris, said after the Flyers practiced in Voorhees on Wednesday. "I'm kind of eager to go home and see what's going on. It's all around the news, and what has happened is terrifying.
FOOD
December 26, 2014 | By Michael Klein, For The Inquirer
Coyote Crossing , at age 18 one of the region's longer-running Mexican restaurants (800 Spring Mill Ave., Conshohocken, 610-825-3000), has reopened after a dramatic renovation. Owner Carlos Melendez did more than reconfigure and revamp the bar and dining room, playing off the vaulted ceilings yet keeping the warmth. He brought in a new chef, Jose Antonio Hidalgo. The men met in Mexico while Melendez was there developing a line of Coyote Crossing mezcal, the agave-based spirit that now is a specialty at the bar. He also hired his former wife, Jennifer Melendez Lazorcheck, as general manager.
NEWS
December 21, 2014 | By Ilene Raymond Rush, For The Inquirer
When 2-year-old Brandon Schultz of Bryn Mawr was diagnosed with autism in 2009, his mother, Jean, was devastated. "You never think it's going to happen to you," she says. But since those early days, Schultz, 44, a cardiac clinical care specialist, has become an advocate for finding a cure for and the causes of autism spectrum disorder. She speaks to parents and clinicians on her experience, and has enrolled Brandon in several clinical trials at the Center for Autism Research at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia.
NEWS
December 20, 2014 | By Chris Hepp, Inquirer Staff Writer
Nextdoor.com, a for-profit social-networking site, and the Nutter administration announced a partnership Thursday that will enable the city to communicate directly with Nextdoor's 17,000 local users. It will allow the city to more narrowly focus its online interactions with residents who belong to the online network. The Streets Department, for example, will be able to send a notification of a street closing to residents in the affected neighborhoods. "This offers us a cost-effective method to communicate with residents in a targeted way," Managing Director Rich Negrin said.
BUSINESS
December 16, 2014 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Exelon Generation Co. hopes to decide by New Year's Day who is going to buy the square-columned Peco Delaware Station power plant that the company owns on 16 acres between the river and Interstate 95, just north of Center City. More than a dozen would-be owners walked the property this fall, and Exelon managers and their real estate brokers at Binswanger are still weighing best offers, Exelon spokesman Bob Judge told me. Nearby, the vacant field once proposed for a Trump Tower complex, approved for the Northern Liberties waterfront at 709-717 N. Penn St., but never built, is for sale by U.S. Bank and other lenders who foreclosed on the two-acre site.
BUSINESS
December 15, 2014 | By Reid Kanaley, Inquirer Columnist
How would you incorporate a company, settle a fight with a tenant, or get a lawyer in a criminal case? Jargon-free legal information is at hand from a variety of sites and mobile apps. One of the best places to start is Nolo.com. Its extensive area for free legal information can give you detailed pointers on debt management, LGBT law, personal finance, and many other issues. The immigration-law page covers what to do if you think you qualify for deferral under the program that President Obama recently took executive action to expand.
NEWS
December 14, 2014 | By David O'Reilly, Inquirer Staff Writer
With a heave of chrome shovels, the leadership of Rowan University and local politicians ceremonially broke ground Friday for a new home for the Rohrer College of Business. "What a day!" exclaimed Rowan's president, Ali Houshmand, who extolled the $63.2 million project as evidence of New Jersey's commitment to expanding educational opportunities for its high school graduates, many of whom are forced to look outside the state for higher education. When completed in spring of 2017, the four-story, 96,500-square-foot building will have capacity to serve 2,000 students, double the current business school enrollment at the university.
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