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BUSINESS
March 11, 2015 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
CertainTeed Corp.'s new research and development laboratory in Chester County is nearly 60 percent smaller than the one it replaced in Blue Bell, but that doesn't mean the maker of roofing, siding, insulation, and other products is dialing back on expectations. "We didn't really give up any capabilities when we moved it here," said Minas Apelian, vice president of research and development at CertainTeed, part of French building-materials giant Saint-Gobain, during a tour Monday of the new facility in East Whiteland Township.
NEWS
March 4, 2015 | BY MORGAN ZALOT, Daily News Staff Writer zalotm@phillynews.com, 215-854-5928
SEAN MOSES, an accused serial peeping tom, wrote a tutorial to go with a video of two Villanova University coeds undressing that police say he posted on a porn website: "When you get caught out of position you ruin what could have been an awesome semester in voyeurism 101," he wrote. Moses, 37, got caught out of position. And yesterday, Radnor Township Police said, detectives ruined his "semester in voyeurism 101" when they showed up at the Narberth home he shares with his girlfriend and their 6-year-old daughter and arrested him on more than 200 criminal counts for his voyeuristic videos.
REAL_ESTATE
March 1, 2015 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
I'm reaching into the drawer that holds information rather than questions this week, and the first item I retrieve concerns refrigerator food spoilage when the power goes out for a long period. From appliance protection plan company Protect Your Bubble comes word that the average value of food that spoils if a refrigerator stops working is $173.37. In 2014, January was the month with the highest number of food spoilage claims, followed by May, July, June, and April. Items people are concerned about the most when power goes out are meats, milk, and vegetables.
NEWS
February 26, 2015 | By Michael Boren, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Route 90 ramp in Pennsauken where an oil tanker burst into flames Monday will remain closed for several days as crews clean up fuel that spilled onto the roadway and into nearby soil, Delaware River Port Authority officials said Tuesday. A light pole and the guardrail will also have to be replaced and the road repaved. The DRPA, which controls the ramp, will ask TK Transport, a Pennsauken-based company that employs the tanker's driver, to pay for the repairs. "I don't expect any resistance," the DRPA's chief executive, John Hanson, said.
NEWS
February 16, 2015 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Maple Shade Township Council has voted unanimously to investigate the possibility of erecting a memorial to the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. on the former site of a cafe where the young King was confronted by a bartender who refused to serve him and his friends. The now state-owned plot on Main Street next to busy Route 73 was the location of Mary's Place, where a 1950 incident helped shape King's character and inspired his passion for civil rights. The town approved a motion Thursday night to seek state authorization to install a memorial there.
NEWS
February 9, 2015 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
When the Parking Authority of the City of Camden decided it wanted to tear down the decades-old Commerce Building in the heart of downtown to put up a parking garage, it made an offer far below the property owner's expectations. The Estate of Milton Rubin, a real estate investor in the city, had been paying property taxes on an assessment of $1.66 million, and in 2007 had prepared to sell it for $4.5 million. The Parking Authority's offer came in considerably lower. In a letter in June, the agency raised the specter of eminent domain as it offered minus $200,000 - essentially asking the estate to part with the building and pay on top of it. The authority based its offer on an appraisal it commissioned that said the cost of renovating the building would exceed its potential income.
NEWS
February 8, 2015 | By Jessica Parks, Inquirer Staff Writer
Two area congressmen said Friday that the Navy's repeated delays on off-loading the former Willow Grove air base were having a ripple effect on the ability of local, state, and federal agencies to plan for the future. Reps. Patrick Meehan and Brendan Boyle said the continued delays on transferring the 850-acre base were hindering planning for school enrollment, transportation projects, and attracting real estate and business investment. "We're now 10 years into" the base's being decommissioned, said Meehan, a Republican.
NEWS
January 20, 2015 | By Laura McCrystal, Inquirer Staff Writer
After scrapping a controversial plan for a hotel, apartments, and retail space on one of the region's most desirable sites, BioMed Realty Trust has returned to Radnor Township with a counterproposal. But officials and residents of the Main Line community say the new plan - for an office park near the heavily traveled intersection of the Blue Route and Lancaster Avenue - is even worse. "The dismay that I feel, it comes from the fact that this is a very sophisticated community and we should be able to come up with a better solution for this site," Commissioner Elaine Schaefer said at last Monday's meeting when the plan was presented.
SPORTS
January 16, 2015
Philadelphia has been selected as the host city for the final of the CONCACAF Gold Cup, according to a source with direct knowledge of the decision. Lincoln Financial Field beat out Baltimore's M&T Bank Stadium, Atlanta's Georgia Dome and most notably East Rutherford, N.J.'s MetLife Stadium. The home of the NFL's New York Giants and Jets had been the overwhelming favorite to host the title game of the signature tournament for North and Central Americans national teams. But officials in Philadelphia worked extremely hard to snatch the big game out of the Meadowlands' grasp.
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