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NEWS
July 10, 2014 | BY MORGAN ZALOT, VINNY VELLA & DYLAN SEGELBAUM, Daily News Staff Writers zalotm@phillynews.com, 215-854-5928
IT WOULD HAVE been impossible for firefighters to arrive any quicker at Saturday's devastating blaze on Gesner Street that claimed the lives of four young children. That's the message that Fire Commissioner Derrick Sawyer wanted heard loud and clear yesterday as the city, in an unusual move, released 9-1-1 recordings and a list of GPS-tracked response times of the first four companies to arrive on the block in the Elmwood section of Southwest Philadelphia. "You cannot get there quicker than a minute," Sawyer said, referring to the time between when a firefighter from Ladder 4, around the corner from the fire, notified dispatchers that the ladder truck was heading there and when the truck arrived on the block at 2:48 a.m. "That's not humanly possible," he said.
NEWS
July 8, 2014 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
She wasn't even born when her father was making history. But Princess Elettra Marconi Giovanelli, the daughter of legendary Italian physicist Guglielmo Marconi, has faithfully spread the story of his work, sharing it this summer in New Jersey as part of a North American tour that also took her to schools and museums in Massachusetts and Canada. She visited the Infoage Science History Museum in the 2200 block of Marconi Road in Wall Township, N.J., to commemorate the 101st anniversary of her father's visit to the site on June 30, 1913.
NEWS
July 3, 2014 | By Michael Boren, Inquirer Staff Writer
Horse-racing enthusiasts in Camden County have had two choices when gambling in person: Drive an hour to the nearest offtrack betting facility in New Jersey, or across the Delaware River to one in Philadelphia. Now, Camden County gamblers can bet on a shorter commute. Favorites, the state's fifth offtrack betting facility, opened Tuesday in Clementon. Penn National Gaming Inc., which is managing it, hopes the new site will draw South Jersey gamblers and, ultimately, compete with the betting parlors in Pennsylvania.
NEWS
June 30, 2014 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
The first time John Perozzi went to Sainte-Mère-Église, he parachuted into a war zone, with the crack, crack, crack of gunfire all around him. The Camden native dropped several hundred feet to a farm, helped liberate the French town, and was shot as the Allies invaded Normandy. Seventy years later, a decidedly different reception awaited him. Perozzi was greeted like a hero when he returned shortly before the June 6 anniversary of D-Day. A French woman, Cecile Gancel, who was about 11 when he parachuted onto her farm field, welcomed him with a warm embrace and pointed out where he landed.
NEWS
June 28, 2014 | By Michaelle Bond, Inquirer Staff Writer
Eleven-year-old Ryan Dougherty, who has Down syndrome, looks forward all year to summer camp at a Chester County farm. There he has learned to overcome his fear of animals and improve his social skills. But people at the Barn at Spring Brook Farm, where children with special needs help care for the animals, say it could close Aug. 31 if Pocopson Township does not give it more time to raise money to meet zoning requirements. "I don't know how I would break that to him," said Ryan's mother, Danielle.
NEWS
June 25, 2014 | By Angelo Fichera, Inquirer Staff Writer
A photo from 2004 shows Jose David Ortega standing triumphantly at the site of a housing complex in Williamstown. He is wearing a tool belt and a backward cap, with a pile of wood beams to the left, a freshly erected home in the background. "He enjoyed [seeing] the house finished," said his mother, Odily Castro, in her East Camden home Monday. Ortega, 40, who went by his middle name, took delight in his work - completed houses, solid cement at his feet, his two young sons by his side.
NEWS
June 22, 2014 | By Michael Boren, David O'Reilly, and Julia Terruso, Inquirer Staff Writers
It was lunchtime, and the building - a long-vacant Blockbuster Video store on Route 38 in Cherry Hill - had been nearly razed to make way for a new Super Wawa. But things went awry at 12:31 Friday, when a cinder block wall and a metal roof collapsed during the demolition, killing one worker and sending another to the hospital. The dead worker was a male day laborer who had been employed by a subcontractor for just two weeks, federal officials said Friday night. An official with knowledge of the accident said the victim was evidently inside what remained of the building even as its walls were being knocked down.
BUSINESS
June 19, 2014 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia officials are assembling property at the former Frankford Arsenal site in Northeast Philadelphia for use by cold-cuts-maker Dietz & Watson Inc. as a new warehouse and trucking center. The new facility would replace the 260,000-square-foot facility in Delanco, Burlington County that burned down in 2013. That seven-year-old warehouse employed 130 people. A new warehouse on the proposed property would be convenient to Dietz & Watson's nearby headquarters on Tacony Street - and a coup for the city at the expense of New Jersey, which has been offering buckets of cash to employers in an attempt to lure them from Pennsylvania or stop them from moving away.
SPORTS
June 8, 2014 | BY BOB COONEY, Daily News Staff Writer cooneyb@phillynews.com
THE 76ERS are moving to New Jersey. But relax, Philadelphia fans, it's only for practice. Practice, man. Practice. After months of speculation of where the team would build its much-anticipated facility, CEO Scott O'Neil released a statement yesterday saying that the organization has "officially filed an application for a site along the New Jersey waterfront in Camden. We understand the New Jersey Economic Development Authority will be voting on an incentive for a possible facility on the waterfront at their upcoming meeting.
NEWS
June 8, 2014 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
Temple University is shutting down AxisPhilly, the nonprofit public-service news website that investigates and reports on civic issues in the city, the university announced Friday. The website, administered by the Center for Public Interest Journalism at Temple, was started in 2012 with a grant of about $2.4 million from the William Penn Foundation, which has indicated it would not renew funding, said David Boardman, dean of Temple's School of Media and Communication. "We needed to do something," said Boardman, who added that the site was nearly out of money.
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