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BUSINESS
April 7, 2015 | By Diane Mastrull, Inquirer Columnist
From my seat in the belly of an industry wracked by declining print circulation and ad revenue, Jennifer Padova Gallagher's name choice for her start-up company - GoPaperboy.com - first struck me as endearingly nostalgic. Then I wondered if it was woefully misguided, before settling on amusingly ironic. After all, the business is a website aimed at a generation hardly familiar with newspapers. But the concept - to link students looking to earn some cash with families who need their services, be it babysitting, tutoring, yard work, or dog walking - is premised on Gallagher's interest in planting the seed of business self-sufficiency early.
NEWS
April 6, 2015 | By Erin E. Arvedlund, Inquirer Columnist
The most important financial event in your life can be landing a job. And when readers write in saying, "Thanks, but how about helping me find work?" how can I refuse? First place to start the hunt is a supportive environment. That would be the Free Library of Philadelphia, both the central library at 1901 Vine St., just off the Parkway - where a job fair is scheduled for 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. May 21 on the first floor - and the regional libraries, such as the Paschalville branch, at 6942 Woodland Ave. Then there's the Free Library's year-round career center.
NEWS
March 31, 2015 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Hessians were out for blood that autumn day in 1777. They marched 10 miles from Haddonfield to Red Bank, hoping to surprise the American defenders of Fort Mercer on the Delaware River. Instead, they fell into a trap. Many of Britain's German allies passed over the abandoned earthen walls topped with pointed logs, and then cheered, thinking they'd breached the fort and were close to victory. On the other side, though, was another wall - and a deadly hail of artillery and musket fire that cut through their ranks like a scythe.
NEWS
March 31, 2015 | By Alfred Lubrano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Many dangerous and unsafe buildings that should be inspected every 10 to 30 days have not been seen by inspectors from the Department of Licenses and Inspections in years, The Inquirer has learned. At the same time, the agency's Construction Site Task Force has been so adept at fining contractors for violations such as failing to display permits or update insurance in the city computer system, builders complain, that L&I is delaying construction while city building is booming. Critics of the beleaguered agency say that proves it is on the wrong track, with safety taking a backseat to the exigencies of collecting cash and flexing its muscle over comparatively minor infractions.
NEWS
March 30, 2015 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
When it comes to redeveloping the magnificent site long occupied by Bancroft, a residential special-needs school, Haddonfield always knows what it doesn't want. "JUST SAY NO," a typical online post urged in 2010, as the borough planning board was considering a retirement-community proposal for the 19-acre Kings Highway property. Fierce public opposition scuttled that idea, and in 2013, a bitter grassroots battle ended with voters rejecting the Haddonfield Board of Education's $12.5 million proposal to buy the tract for public use. Bancroft has considered leaving the borough for a decade.
NEWS
March 23, 2015 | By Jeremy Roebuck, Inquirer Staff Writer
Archbishop Charles J. Chaput is expected to tour city shelters, soup kitchens, food pantries, and health clinics Monday to draw attention to the issues of homelessness and hunger in advance of Pope Francis' visit to Philadelphia in the fall. The tour, in which the archbishop will be joined by civic and business leaders from across the region, will be dubbed the Óscar Romero Day of Commitment, after a former archbishop of San Salvador known for his dedication to bettering conditions for the poor in his country, the archdiocese said Sunday.
NEWS
March 18, 2015 | By Allison Steele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Camden and state officials said Monday that they hoped an infusion of federal funds for environmental cleanup would begin the transformation of the abandoned former Camden Laboratories site into housing, businesses, and other development. Camden Mayor Dana L. Redd was joined by Rep. Donald Norcross (D., N.J.) and U.S. Sen. Robert Menendez (D., N.J.) in making the announcement at the Davis Street site. Last week, the city received $200,000 from the Environmental Protection Agency to use toward the revitalization of the Mount Ephraim Avenue corridor.
NEWS
March 18, 2015 | By Rita Giordano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Real estate developer J. Brian O'Neill announced Monday that he has an agreement to buy the Bancroft School property in Haddonfield and that he intends to turn it into a drug and alcohol treatment center. "This is a unique behavioral health facility in a great location," said O'Neill, chief executive officer of Recovery Centers of America (RCA). He and Bancroft officials declined to say how much he will pay for the nearly 19-acre property along Kings Highway and Hopkins Lane. A proposal to sell the land to the Haddonfield school district for $12 million was defeated in a hotly debated bond referendum in 2013.
BUSINESS
March 16, 2015 | By Jacob Adelman, For The Inquirer
Eric Martin, 28, has tried his hand at day trading, running for Congress, and designing kids' games. None of those efforts came to much. But his latest scheme could soon make him an Internet multimillionaire. The fresh-faced father of two won a competition to recruit the most new users for the soon-to-be-launched shopping site Jet.com, the brainchild of a Web entrepreneur whose last business was bought by Amazon for about $545 million. Martin was awarded stock options that could be worth $18 million if the company is successful, an outcome that some of the world's biggest investors are banking on. "I still have my full-time job. This was more like a moonshot," Martin said recently in his small York, Pa., home.
TRAVEL
March 15, 2015 | By Rick Steves, For The Inquirer
Eastern Europe has experienced more change in the last generation than any other corner of Europe. With war-era grandpas now gone, across the former Warsaw Pact zone new museums and memorials deal candidly with the dark side of communism - and fascism before that. Here's the latest: In Prague, the National Museum on Wenceslas Square is wrapping up a long renovation. By mid-2015, visitors should be able to see its interior, decorated in the Czech Revival style that heralded the 19th-century rebirth of the Czech nation.
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