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Skeleton

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NEWS
September 20, 1998 | By Catherine Quillman, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Artist Jimmy Lynch once posed nude for Andrew Wyeth. For another painting, Draft Age, by Jamie Wyeth, he wore his signature leather jacket and a pair of 1960s-style wraparound sunglasses. In the end, the Andrew Wyeth painting, completed in 1990 and titled Man and the Moon, captured what Lynch thinks of today as his former "dark" self. Now, Lynch, 54, is no longer prone to the long and moody meditations that once found him sitting on his porch swing for days, pondering a career move to California.
NEWS
June 11, 1997 | Inquirer photos by Michael Mally
It was the world's largest known land carnivore - 47 feet long, 12 to 18 feet tall and weighing seven to eight tons. The "Giganotosaurus carolinii," or at least a replica of its skeleton, is coming to Philadelphia. The replica is being mounted by Barry and April James of Sunbury, Pa., a vertebrate paleontologist and an anthropologist, respectively, and will go on display at the Academy of Natural Sciences starting at 10 a.m. Saturday.
NEWS
May 8, 1996 | by Marianne Costantinou, Daily News Staff Writer Daily News staff writer Joanne Sills contributed to this report
All that remains of a child are the remains of a skeleton. A head. The ribs. A thigh. No arms. No feet. No flesh. No hair. And no clothes. Except for tattered remains of a childhood: a white T-shirt or sweatshirt proclaiming "Batman Forever. " The skeleton was found by a fisherman Monday morning on the rocky banks of a canal in Delaware. Its identity is still unknown. But in East Mount Airy, the skeleton's discovery has renewed fears that something awful has happened to two little boys who have been missing since Dec. 28. One of the boys, 3-year-old Prince Randall Cunningham Upshaw, was wearing a Batman outfit the last time his family saw him, said his grandfather.
NEWS
February 7, 1990 | By Nancy Phillips, Inquirer Staff Writer Inquirer staff writer John Way Jennings contributed to this article
The skeleton offered few clues. Bones, partially clothed, gold earrings and a 16-inch strand of faux pearls. Investigators do not know how or when the woman met her death. Or even who she was. All they have to go on is the skeleton found in some brush at the edge of a cornfield in Deptford Township, Gloucester County. Two hunters made the grisly discovery on Monday as they trekked through the field about a mile from Caulfield Avenue. Police combed the area yesterday searching for clues.
NEWS
August 7, 1987 | By JACK McGUIRE, Daily News Staff Writer
The skeleton found this week in an abandoned North Philadelphia rowhouse was that of a male aged 25 to 40, according to preliminary autopsy results. A spokesman for doctors in the Philadelphia medical examiner's office said yesterday that the individual had been dead for at least two years but that no cause of death was readily apparent. Final results of the autopsy will not be available for at least two more days, he said. The spokesman said an attempt would be made to identify the individual through dental records.
NEWS
August 7, 2014 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
Janet Monge knew for years that the Penn Museum had quite the skeleton in its closet, a box of bones supinely displayed, carefully encased in wax, wrapped in burlap, and positioned on a board. "Somebody took great pains to take a very fragmentary skeleton and bring it here," said Monge, the curator who oversees the physical anthropology section of the museum in University City. "Therefore, it must be important. " There was no catalog card or identifying information. So the skeleton sat obscurely for years in a ground-floor storage room at the University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology.
NEWS
August 25, 1987 | By JOANNE SILLS, Daily News Staff Writer
She waited until her boyfriend had gone out. Then she leaned out the rear bedroom window of their apartment and gingerly lifted a mattress that had been placed on the roof below. Under the mattress was a skeleton. Despite her horror, she continued to raise the mattress until she could see it all. As she stared, she remembered her boyfriend's words. He had told her, "I offed my girlfriend. " He had challenged her to look on the roof, she said. But after she had had her look, she asked herself, "What did I go do that for . . . ?
NEWS
August 25, 1987 | By JOANNE SILLS, Daily News Staff Writer
She waited until her boyfriend had gone out. Then she leaned out the rear bedroom window of their apartment and gingerly lifted a mattress that had been placed on the roof below. Under the mattress was a skeleton. Despite her horror, she continued to raise the mattress until she could see it all. As she stared, she remembered her boyfriend's words. He had told her, "I offed my girlfriend. " He had challenged her to look on the roof, she said. But after she had had her look, she asked herself, "What did I go do that for?
SPORTS
February 16, 2006 | By Frank Fitzpatrick INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Two days before the Olympic men's skeleton final, Eric Bernotas yesterday positioned himself as one of the favorites by winning both training runs at Cesana-Pariol. The Malvern native turned in times of 57.97 seconds and 58.16. He now owns three of the top five times from this week's six practice sessions. "I have to take it easy because I haven't had much rest," Bernotas said afterward. "I'm hoping it doesn't snow so we can have a consistent and fair race. " Light snow has been forecast for the mountains west of Turin today.
SPORTS
February 21, 2002 | By Joe Juliano INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
After Jim Shea Jr. completed the most exhilarating skeleton ride of his life, and after fellow contestants from many nations finished mobbing him, he took off his helmet and reached inside. It took Shea a while to locate what he was looking for. But he finally found it, the source of his inspiration for the race. It was a Mass card commemorating the tragic death of his grandfather, Jack Shea, the first of his family's three generations of U.S. Olympians. Jim Shea slid through heavy, wet snowflakes at the Utah Olympic Park and rode the wave of a delirious crowd to win the gold medal in the men's skeleton, the first competition of this sport in the Winter Games in 54 years.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
July 2, 2016 | By Alexandra Villarreal, Staff Writer
In 1868, the Academy of Natural Sciences mounted the first-ever full dinosaur skeleton. A century and a half later, it's forcing the dinos out of extinction with state-of-the-art animatronics that mimic their actions, looks, and sounds from millions of years ago. "Back in 1868, no one had ever conceived of being able to see a skeleton of an animal like a dinosaur, and just to see the skeleton was a wonder of the world," said Ted Daeschler, the...
NEWS
January 8, 2016 | By Aubrey Whelan, Staff Writer
City workers found the skeleton first. The lot they were cleaning on Kensington's East Cambria Street - where they stumbled across it Wednesday - was overgrown, choked with weeds and trash, studded with discarded hypodermic needles. The bones - "full skeletal remains," police called them - were lodged in the frozen ground. The 24th District officers showed up, then the news trucks, and then, once everyone had cleared out, the crime scene investigation unit. They dug the bones out with dirt-caked shovels, and were lifting them into a body bag by the time Louis Kulb crossed the street to talk to them.
NEWS
February 14, 2015 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
The students leaned in for a better look at their subject - a flattened skeleton, curled up and encased in a brown gunk of dirt and wax. "I've never been this up close and personal with something . . . that old," said Carly Sokach, 21, a University of Pennsylvania senior. That's 5,300 years old. The skeleton was excavated from a 50-foot pit in Iraq in 1930, packed in a crate and shipped to the Penn Museum. Not much more was known about it. For decades, the skeleton had rested in obscurity, with no paperwork to explain its provenance.
NEWS
December 20, 2014
ISSUE | MAKING SAUSAGE Sharpened veto pen Even though there has been little mention of the line-item veto for a long time, its restoration would be the best thing Washington could do. Lawmakers currently add earmarks to bills, provisions that mean handouts for fat cats as rewards for campaign contributions. This results in a higher priority for reelection than to do what's best for the nation. It also wastes taxpayers' money and contributes to unsustainable budget deficits. The line-item veto would allow a president to veto wasteful earmarks.
NEWS
December 17, 2014 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
Ken Lacovara's Drexel University laboratory was crammed with sturdy wooden crates, each one packed with bones from the monster that he affectionately refers to as "Dread. " It was dinosaur shipping time. Seventeen crates, six pallets, 150 bones. The remains of Dreadnoughtus schrani and two smaller prehistoric creatures had to fit inside a 40-foot shipping container on Monday. Would it work? Lacovara, a Drexel paleontologist, announced in September that he and colleagues had discovered the massive beast in the Patagonia region of Argentina.
NEWS
November 2, 2014 | BY STEPHANIE FARR, Daily News Staff Writer farrs@phillynews.com, 215-854-4225
A MOTORIST who was robbed by a man in a skeleton mask early Thursday morning in North Philadelphia chased the creepy robber to the front door of a nearby house, where he was then shot by the 32-year-old boney bandit and his 17-year-old girlfriend, according to police. The victim, a 53-year-old man who suffered two gunshot wounds to his leg, is listed in stable condition at Temple University Hospital. Of the two alleged offenders, only the teenage girl is in custody. Her boyfriend remains on the run, police said.
NEWS
September 26, 2014 | BY GARY THOMPSON, Daily News Staff Writer thompsg@phillynews.com, 215-854-5992
IN "THE SKELETON Twins," Bill Hader and Kristen Wiig turn their old "SNL" rapport into a convincing brother/sister dynamic. Be advised, though, this is not strictly or even mainly a comedy - Milo (Hader) has just attempted suicide, and the movie's opening shots tell you that Maggie (Wiig) is thinking along the same lines. And Milo's botched suicide is only his latest failure - he's an unemployed actor, he's just been dumped, and since his future in L.A. looks bleak, he agrees to move back to upstate New York and bunk with Maggie and her new husband, Lance (a Luke Wilson sighting!
NEWS
February 13, 2014 | By Bob Ford, Inquirer Columnist
Charlie Manuel has studied the young woman's face and knows where she got it. She is only 29 years old, but Manuel has seen the same face for more than 50 years, going back to when he met Ted Uhlaender at Al Lang Field in St. Petersburg, Fla., during Manuel's first professional instructional league season. They were alike, the rawboned Appalachian kid and the Midwestern farm boy, and they became best friends on their long trek through the Minnesota Twins minor-league system. Both made it to the majors, the friendship endured and tightened through the decades, and Manuel eventually hired Uhlaender as his first-base coach when he managed the Cleveland Indians.
NEWS
October 31, 2013 | By Karen Heller, Inquirer Columnist
Calvin Coleman spent part of his 75th birthday Sunday protesting the skeleton in George Vucelich's yard in Delaware County. The cake and scallops dinner would have to wait. The skeleton hangs from a maple tree. A noose appears to be around its scrawny plastic neck. It also wears an Obama-Biden T-shirt. "When I first heard of this, I was irate. I believed something like this wouldn't happen in Swarthmore," said Coleman, who is African American and whose family has resided in Delaware County for six generations.
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