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Skeleton

NEWS
January 2, 2010 | By Amy Worden INQUIRER HARRISBURG BUREAU
For nearly 12,000 years, the giant beast lay buried under a peat bog in the Poconos, until a dredging machine accidentally hooked its massive skull in 1968. Workers quickly abandoned their peat-mining expedition and started collecting bones, gathering about 90 percent of its skeleton, the most nearly intact mastodon ever found in Pennsylvania. The Marshalls Creek Mastodon - named for the tiny community near East Stroudsburg where it was found - has been part of the State Museum of Pennsylvania's collection since, but the public has never seen it in its entirety.
NEWS
May 7, 2009 | By GARY THOMPSON, thompsg@phillynews.com
In "Outrage," it's asserted that you can't swing a dead cat in Washington, D.C., without hitting a gay Republican. Left unstated, but implied, is that gay Republicans should be hit with dead cats, or subject to special punishment for assisting a political organization that actively works against the interests of homosexuals (same-sex marriage, AIDS funding). Short of hitting them with dead cats, "Outrage" simply identifies them, piggybacking on the work done in the gay media.
FOOD
November 27, 2008 | By Joyce Gemperlein FOR THE INQUIRER
My Thanksgiving dinners hold expectation and strategy, but no surprises: My mother-in-law always contributes a bowl of trail mix to the coffee-table appetizers; my husband always insists on canned, jellied cranberry sauce. And while the gravy is still hot in its china boat, certain relatives testily revisit long-held and contrasting thoughts on who killed JFK. Then there is the person on the edge of her seat plotting the confiscation of the turkey carcass. That would be me. Stuffing, sweet potatoes with marshmallows, country ham or Uncle Ed's mincemeat pie mark the holiday for legions of Americans.
NEWS
November 24, 2008 | By Tom Avril INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
He was one of the first rock stars. So many people came to gawk at the long-limbed figure that handlers started charging 10 cents' admission in a vain effort to limit the crowds. By the next year, his fame would spread to far-off London, where a magazine called him "a reptilian master of the world. " It was 1868 in Philadelphia, and Hadrosaurus foulkii was the world's first dinosaur skeleton to go on public display. Last weekend, he - or perhaps she (as with some rock stars, scientists say it's hard to tell)
NEWS
February 25, 2007 | By Will Hobson FOR THE INQUIRER
The existence of fate, or destiny, is unprovable, but those looking for evidence have a reason to believe in Eric Bernotas. It's hard to hear the 1989 Malvern Prep graduate explain how he, a stonemason at age 30 who had never even heard of the sport of skeleton, is at age 35 the four-time defending national champion and an Olympic medal contender without thinking that perhaps there is a little more at work here than just dumb luck. The little-known sport of skeleton is similar to the bobsled or luge, with racers gaining a running head start before plunging down a tunnel of ice. Skeleton racers fly head-first down the same tracks as the other sports, hitting speeds up to 80 m.p.h.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 16, 2007 | By BOB STRAUSS Los Angeles Daily News
"Ghost Rider" has always been a second-tier Marvel Comics title, and there have been advantages as well as disadvantages to that. It's been able to get creepier and more peculiar over the years precisely because it didn't have to maintain an approach more popular titles, such as "Spider-Man" and "X-Men," needed to nurture. That said, it never really went anywhere all that mythically resonant, either. Satanic filigree and cowboy references aside, this literal hell's angel on wheels always seemed like a, well, ghost repeat of better-established Marvel characters.
SPORTS
January 25, 2007 | Daily News staff and wire reports
Capt. Brian S. Freeman, a former member of the Army World Class Athlete Program who competed in both bobsled and skeleton with the United States national team, was killed last week in Iraq, officials said. Freeman, 31, was among five Americans killed Saturday after an ambush by gunmen dressed as U.S. troops near Karbala, defense officials said. "He was one of the greatest men I have ever known," said World Cup overall bobsled leader and 2006 Olympian Steven Holcomb, who was in the WCAP program with Freeman.
NEWS
September 21, 2006 | Daily News wire services
NASA clears Atlantis to land this morning NASA managers said yesterday that they would probably "never know for sure" what caused unexpected and mysterious debris to appear around the space shuttle Atlantis in the past two days. But after a day of inspections, they said the craft showed no sign of damage, and they cleared it to land this morning at the Kennedy Space Center in Florida after a 12-day mission to the International Space Station. The shuttle had two landing opportunities on successive orbits at 6:21 a.m. and 7:57 a.m. U.S. not happy as Thai general outlines his plans Thailand's new military ruler, winning crucial royal backing for his bloodless coup, announced yesterday that he would not call elections for another year.
NEWS
September 21, 2006
The publicity blitz over the sexual awakening of former Democratic Gov. Jim McGreevey glosses over the one thing that mattered most to New Jerseyans: He was a lousy governor. McGreevey, who resigned in August 2004 with his revelation that he is a "gay American," obviously has found emotional and spiritual peace. Good for Citizen McGreevey. But his campaign to market his book, The Confession, cannot wash away the bad taste that lingers from McGreevey's failed tenure as governor.
NEWS
August 28, 2006 | By Erika Engelhaupt FOR THE INQUIRER
Tom Bugler bends over a 2 1/2-inch-wide steel rod, with his blowtorch blazing and sweat beading above his dark glasses. A few deft tugs, and the metal assumes the shape of a bone laid in the Earth more than 65 million years ago. When he's finished, the rod will run up the back of a Tyrannosaurus rex's leg as smoothly as the seam on a pair of nylon stockings. Those long legs will then stand flexed and ready to charge, as befits the top carnivore of its time. It's taken more than 60 years for someone to fix this T. rex so it can stand in death the way it towered in life.
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