CollectionsSketches
IN THE NEWS

Sketches

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
July 12, 1990 | By Mary Anne Janco, Special to The Inquirer
A robbery victim gave Upper Darby police more than just a description of the gunman - he drew them a picture. Police said the drawing had come from an art teacher in the Philadelphia School District, one of two residents robbed of $260 in their home in the 100 block of Powell Lane at 7 a.m. Saturday. They gave this account: A woman resident was entering the home when a man with a handgun approached her and told her that he "was a junkie" and "needed money. " He told her that if she gave him money, "everything would be OK. " The man pointed a gun at her head, and she agreed to give him money.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 6, 1998 | By Douglas J. Keating, INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
Each month during the theater season, the Brick Playhouse, which specializes in developing new plays, presents a program of short works-in-progress that it dubs the "IT" (Independent Theater) series. The program began last season, and last June the Brick staged the first "The Best of IT," consisting of six plays from the monthly programs. Because that initial "The Best of IT" was not all that good, it was a pleasant surprise to discover that the second one, now at the Painted Bride Art Center, is a worthwhile evening of theater.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 24, 1998 | By Tom Moon, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Jeff Buckley, the singer-songwriter who drowned in a Memphis, Tenn., harbor last May, was an old soul. He sang Edith Piaf and caught the ache just right. He called one of his music publishing companies El Viejito ("the little old man") Music, and its catalog contained songs that were heavy with the weight of the world. At the same time, Buckley - who died at age 30, after issuing just one album, the 1994 Grace - was the quintessential brash young artist. Prone to long-winded phrases and purple prose, he wrote with feverish intensity, as if to bludgeon listeners until they shared every ounce of his grandiose passion.
NEWS
November 12, 1986 | By Caroline Burns, Special to The Inquirer
The architect for the proposed addition to Pemberton Township High School No. 2 unveiled sketches of the project last night at the school board meeting. Charles W. Thorne, of the Trenton-based architecture firm of Faridy, Thorne, Maddish, showed drawings of the proposed two-story addition, which would add 55 classrooms, a large gym, three smaller gyms and a new library to the existing building. If the school board approves the plan in December, voters will be asked in a referendum in January to decide whether the addition should be built.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 29, 1987 | By Thomas Hine, Inquirer Architecture Critic
It is reasonable to assume that architecture emerged from mankind's basic need for shelter from the elements. But it may not be true. It is at least as likely that people intentionally began to alter their surroundings in an effort to invoke or palliate forces beyond themselves. At its origins, architecture links earth and sky and is inseparable from those impulses we call religion, magic and art. The present-day practice of architecture provides few opportunities for those who would be successors to those primordial wizard-visionaries, because after you pay for the mechanical systems there isn't much left for speaking to the cosmos.
NEWS
February 22, 2004 | By Victoria Donohoe INQUIRER ART CRITIC
The two artists ran a big risk by taking to the streets amid the 1956 Montgomery bus boycott with sketch pad and pencil in hand. Drawn from New York by a catalytic event in American history taking place in that Alabama city, Harvey Dinnerstein and Burton Silverman are now featured in a show - "Glorious Dignity" - of 38 of those drawings at Delaware Art Museum. The museum owns 46 of 90 sketches that the artists made on this boycott theme. The two approached their task in the same spirit of adventure as reporter-illustrators a century ago did when they rushed to cover breaking news for American newspapers before the advent of press photographers.
NEWS
September 24, 2003 | By Desmond Ryan INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
Michael Frayn's Alarms and Excursions is calculated to convert even the most committed geeks into devout Luddites. The Luddites, both literally and figuratively, attacked the new machinery developed for manufacturing at the dawn of the Industrial Revolution. Frayn's theme is the tyranny modern technology inflicts on the hapless consumer that leaves so many of us lost in cyberspace - or screaming at an intricately coded burglar alarm that won't let us into our own house. Frayn came to Alarms and Excursions after writing Copenhagen, his cerebral and provocative consideration of one fascinating chapter at the opening of the atomic age. Is it such a long way from Armageddon to humanity threatened by hostile smoke alarms, timers and answering machines?
ENTERTAINMENT
June 9, 2006 | By GLENN WHIPP Los Angeles Daily News
Sydney Pollack isn't aiming for huge psychological insights with his deliberately casually titled homage to his architect pal, "Sketches of Frank Gehry. " He hasn't come to understand Gehry, so much as to praise him. And, really, with buildings like the Guggenheim Museum Bilbao in Spain and Los Angeles' own Walt Disney Concert Hall, who can argue with a salute to the man's genius? Still, there are more than a few moments during "Sketches" in which you wish Pollack had dug a little deeper.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 14, 1999 | By Douglas J. Keating, INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
The show with the very long name, Canker Stores and Other Distractions: New & Recent One-Act Comedies by Christopher Durang, is quite short. So are the nine plays that comprise it. Even with an intermission, the Theater Rumpus production runs under 90 minutes. By adhering to a such a tight format, Durang, whose considerable reputation is based on such substantial fare as Beyond Therapy and Bette and Boo, gives himself time to do little but present a situation and play around with it a bit before wrapping it up with an imposed conclusion.
NEWS
January 5, 1991 | By Joseph P. Blake, Daily News Staff Writer
On the surface, the two men have little in common. One is an African American, the other a native Russian artist visiting America on a soon-to-expire visa. Beyond that, however, is a vision shared and realized in the form of a religious mural that graces an inside wall of the Mount Pleasant Memorial Baptist Church on Germantown Avenue near Chelten. The painting depicts a dark-skinned Jesus floating angelically in the midst of several adoring African-American worshipers, one of whom is the the Rev. Gilbert Aiken, pastor and founder of the church.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
February 22, 2015 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Staff Writer
In a highly unusual outcome to conservation efforts, the Barnes Foundation has discovered it owns two previously unknown Cézanne sketches - even collector Albert C. Barnes was most likely unaware of their existence. The two works, unmentioned in any correspondence and not included in the master compendium of Cézanne's works, are on the backs of two watercolors that are permanently hung in the foundation's galleries on the Benjamin Franklin Parkway. The works had been taken down a year ago for needed conservation.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 29, 2013 | By Howard Gensler
THE AMANDA BYNES saga gets more and more bizarre, as if Lindsay Lohan being in rehab has left a void in the actress-out-of-control section of the newspaper that Amanda feels obligated to fill. ( Tattle note: We interviewed Amanda a number of times back in her "She's the One," "Hairspray" days and found her to be one of the most together young actresses we'd ever met. We were sure that by the time she turned 30 she would be running a studio. So what the heck happened?)
NEWS
April 23, 2013 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
Digital publishing was barely on the horizon when Lauren Grodstein earned a master of fine arts degree from Columbia University a decade ago. But the publishing world has transformed so rapidly, said Grodstein, director of the M.F.A. program at Rutgers University's Camden campus, that she was beginning to feel uncomfortable offering only traditional writing and literature classes. Now, a new Rutgers program that merges disciplines for an innovative academic collaboration has eight M.F.A.
NEWS
March 23, 2013 | By Barbara Boyer, Inquirer Staff Writer
The remains of a woman found in Burlington County last year revealed little about her life - or death. Officials hope an emerging portrait of what she may have looked like could generate new leads. This week, officials released a sketch that puts a face on the body found by two motorcyclists riding trails in a wooded section of Pemberton Township last summer. After months passed with no significant clues to who she was or how and when she died, forensic experts created what they think she looked like, giving her brown eyes, brown hair, and common features.
NEWS
March 22, 2013 | By Barbara Boyer, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The remains of a woman found in Burlington County last year revealed little about her life - or death. Officials hope an emerging portrait of what she may have looked like could generate new leads. This week, officials released a sketch that puts a face on the body found by two motorcyclists riding trails in a wooded section of Pemberton Township last summer. After months passed with no significant clues to who she was or how and when she died, forensic experts created what they think she looked like, giving her brown eyes, brown hair, and common features.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 31, 2012 | By John Timpane, Inquirer Staff Writer
'This is a town that's always been good at making stuff up," says Jamie J. Brunson. "Try the Declaration of Independence. Try the Constitution. Philly is a town that's always been built on its stories. " Brunson is executive director of the First Person Arts Festival, which, in its 11th annual installment, will soon gather professional storytellers from all over, in a fresh entertainment genre that's also maybe the oldest. Growing outward from meccas such as Los Angeles, Boston, and Chicago, storytelling has been its own genre for decades now. It's a branch on a family tree that includes stand-up comedy, sketch, slam poetry, rap, and hip-hop.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 27, 2012 | Caroline Tiger, For The Inquirer
Adam Kamens was a schoolkid when he started working at Amuneal, a Frankford-based magnetic shielding manufacturer founded in 1965 by his father. He'd always thought he wanted to be a glassblower, but he ended up leaving the glassblowing studio and shop he'd founded in Old City to take over the family business in 2000. When he started, the job involved a lot of calculations. "At the end of the week, my desk blotter would be full of sketches for glass pieces I wanted to make," he says.
NEWS
October 4, 2012
State police have released a composite sketch of a suspect in a Chester County home invasion during which a bankruptcy lawyer was shot and wounded. Fred P. Barakat, 63, was shot after three men allegedly barged into his Pennsbury Township house just before 6:20 p.m. Sept. 24. He was treated at Crozer-Chester Medical Center. Police said the home invasion was not considered random. Two of the men were believed to be wearing masks. Barakat described the third as a 6-foot-tall white man in his 30s with short blond hair.
NEWS
September 11, 2012
So now Mitt Romney actually likes parts of President Obama's signature health-care overhaul - the same "Obamacare" that Romney and congressional Republicans have vowed to repeal on Day 1? What a difference the start of the fall campaign can make. In a move widely interpreted as a bid for undecided, middle-of-the-road voters, the GOP presidential nominee on Sunday said he'd retain provisions that assure young adults coverage on their parents' health plans, as well as the pivotal rule that people with preexisting conditions cannot be denied coverage.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|